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Alsace, France Tavern Crawl

The traditional taverns of northeastern France have a vernacular all their own, one with a thousand variations on pork.
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Rating: 5 out of 5 by EveryTrail members
Difficulty: Easy
Duration: Multiple days

Overview :  The Alsatians wring more feeling out of stub than seems possible for one abrupt syllable that merely translates as "room"—in... more »

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Points of Interest

L’Aigle is the only restaurant in Osthouse, A La Ferme the only hotel, so when you book a room at the one you automatically wind up eating at the other (both places are owned by the Hellmann family). A La Ferme has seven rooms, three in an early-19th-century farmhouse, which you choose for their humble antiques. The others, in an outbuilding once ... More

2. A L’Aigle d’Or

Customers call the cat who freely roams this winstub by name: it’s that kind of place. L’Aigle is the only restaurant in Osthouse, A La Ferme the only hotel, so when you book a room at the one you automatically wind up eating at the other (both places are owned by the Hellmann family). It takes three minutes to reach the hotel from the winstub, a ... More

3. Auberge a l’llwald

The cooking here is on such a high level it seems mean to more rustic winstube to put them and the Illwald in the same pot. On the other hand, at least everyone knows where the bar is set. Winstub classics like headcheese and baeckeoffe (a stew of beef, lamb, and pork that usually includes a pig’s ear and tail) still look like themselves after... More

This winstub was founded in 1873, but it was Yvonne Haller who, running the place from 1954 to 2001, gave it institution status as “the Lipp of Strasbourg” (the reference is to the famously snooty Paris brasserie). Haller treated the winstub like her living room, padding around in carpet slippers, acting cozy with the artists and politicians she... More

5. La Stub Restaurant

With 62 rooms, two pools, and a spa, Le Parc enshrines a certain idea of taste and comfort you may have to be French, middle-class, and from someplace other than Paris to appreciate. Still, it’s not a hardship to spend the night here. Rooms decorated in an Alsatian idiom, i.e., with a lot of wood, have more atmosphere than those done in a ... More

l’hôtel du moment

Address:
4 Rue de Bain aux Plantes
Strasbourg
France

Phone:
33-3-88-32-05-06

Tables are shared, which most Americans are really not comfortable with, so you just hope for the best. The walls are hung with Hansi village scenes and the marquetry landscapes the Spindlers of Boersch have been chiseling since 1893. Dishes from the winstub canon include escargots à l’alsacienne (with bouillon spooned into the shells, in... More

If you knew in advance that Le Marronnier had 500 seats you’d never go. But forget everything you’ve suffered in French restaurants that accept groups and, when staying in Strasbourg (at Le Chut, l’hôtel du moment), book a cab and cover the 6 1/2 miles to Stutzheim. Built as a farmhouse in 1748, Le Marronnier was re-created as a winstub in... More

9. Le Parc

With 62 rooms, two pools, and a spa, Le Parc enshrines a certain idea of taste and comfort you may have to be French, middle-class, and from someplace other than Paris to appreciate. Still, it’s not a hardship to spend the night here. Rooms decorated in an Alsatian idiom, i.e., with a lot of wood, have more atmosphere than those done in a ... More

The interior is invested with that sort of non-décor décor that people who began their eating careers in France 50 years ago know can be a good sign. Lunching outside is a dream, though you might be thrown off the trail by the Provençal tablecloths and miss one of the most authentic eating experiences in Alsace. The view takes... More