Geiranger is one of Norway's top tourist attractions and the fjord, the Geirangerfjord, is world famous.

A fjord is a narrow inlet of the ocean into the mainland. Although Geirangerfjord is not unique, it's beatuifully curved shape, fertile yet steep and unspoiled walls, elegant waterfalls and tiny farms on mountain shelfes makes a visit to Geiranger or a cruise on the fjord a great experience. The picture of the elegantly twisting Geirangerfjord with the tiny village at the end is perhaps the image most associated with Norway. There are no roads or major man-made objects along the fjord. Because of the largely unspoiled character of Geirangerfjord, the area is now a UNESCO world heritage site. In 2006, the National Geographic Magazine named Geiranger (along with Nærøyfjorden) the best preserved UNESCO site in the world. Geirangerfjord is nominated for the New 7 Wonders (group Seascapes).

Geiranger can be approached by car along road 63 from the north (along the great panorama road Eagles highway, 9 hairpin bends) and from the south through the Geiranger mountain road (also an impressive construction including 29 hairpin bends). The Dalsnibba road, a detour from the Geiranger road, continues to the very summit of Mt Dalsnibba.  During summer there is a car ferry from Hellesylt village. More than 100 cruise ships visit Geirangerfjord during summer.

The Geiranger road is closed during winter due to heavy snowfall. Drivers are advised to use the engine for controlling speed downhill (keep a low gear), as long descends can otherwise cause the breaks to overheat.

A trip to Geiranger can easily be combined with a visit to Ålesund or as detour from road E6 Oslo-Trondheim. 

Do not try to climb the steepest summits without proper experience or guide, do not walk on glaciers proper experience or instruction. Be extremely careful on wet, slippery or smooth moss covered slab/cliffs.