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Tbilisi Walking Tour

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US$6.00
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2 travellers
What to Expect
Itinerary
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Stop At: Tsminda Sameba Cathedral, Elia Hill, Tbilisi Georgia

The Holy Trinity Cathedral of Tbilisi commonly known as Sameba is the main cathedral of the Georgian Orthodox Church located in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. Constructed between 1995 and 2004, it is the third-tallest Eastern Orthodox cathedral in the world and one of the largest religious buildings in the world by total area. Sameba is a synthesis of traditional styles dominating the Georgian church architecture at various stages in history and has some Byzantine undertones. The construction of the church was proclaimed as a "symbol of the Georgian national and spiritual revival" and was sponsored mostly by anonymous donations from several businessmen and common citizens. On November 23, 2004, on St. George's Day, the cathedral was consecrated by Catholicos-Patriarch of Georgia Ilia II and high-ranking representatives of fellow Orthodox Churches of the world. The ceremony was also attended by leaders of other religious and confessional communities in Georgia as well as by political leaders. Designed in a traditional Georgian style but with greater vertical emphasis, and "regarded as an eyesore by many people, it is equally venerated by as many others". The Cathedral has a cruciform plan with a dome over a crossing resting on eight columns. At the same time, the parameters of the dome are independent of the apses, imparting a more monumental look to the dome and the church in general. The dome is surmounted by a 7.5-meter tall gilded gold cross. For sure one of the highlights of Georgian churches and Cathedrals.


Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Metekhi Cathedral, Metekhi St, Tbilisi Georgia

Metekhi is a history of Tbilisi, Georgia, located on the elevated cliff that overlooks the Mtkvari river. The neighbourhood is home to the eponymous Metekhi Church of Assumption. The district was one of the earliest inhabited areas on the city’s territory. According to traditional accounts, King Vakhtang I Gorgasali erected here a church and a fort which served also as a king’s residence; hence comes to the name Metekhi which dates back to the 12th century and literally means “the area around the palace”. Tradition holds that it was also a site where the 5th-century martyr lady Saint Shushanik was buried. However, none of these structures has survived the Mongol invasion of 1235.


Duration: 20 minutes

Stop At: Rike Park, The left bank of the Mtkvari River, Tbilisi Georgia

Rike park is considered to be the youngest recreational area in Tbilisi. It is situated on the left bank of the river Kura (Mtkvari) and already has become a popular place for both local and international visitors, especially families, and in summer. The Rike park is quite easy to find, as its main entrance is right from the beautiful pedestrian ‘Bridge of Peace’. The park is a host to numerous entertainment facilities like singing and dancing fountains, artificial climbing wall, children’s maze, mega-chess board, as well as footpaths and quiet corners. The start Point of a newly opened cable car that takes visitors up to Narikala fortress is located in the Rike park, as well as a number of fancy bars and restaurants.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Mother of Georgia, Sololaki St, T'bilisi, Georgia

The statue was erected on the top of Sololaki hill in 1958, the year Tbilisi celebrated its 1500th anniversary. Prominent Georgian sculptor Elguja Amashukeli designed the twenty-metre aluminium figure of a woman in Georgian national dress. She symbolizes the Georgian national character: in her left hand she holds a bowl of wine to greet those who come as friends, and in her right hand is a sword for those who come as enemies.


Duration: 20 minutes

Stop At: Narikala Fortress, Tbilisi Georgia

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi.

St Nicholas church is standing in the middle of Narikala Fortress, it was newly built in 1996–1997 and replaced the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of "prescribed cross" type, having doors on three sides.[1] The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescoes showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Sioni Cathedral Church, Tbilisi Georgia

The Sioni Cathedral of the Dormition is a Georgian Orthodox cathedral in Tbilisi. Following a medieval Georgian tradition of naming churches after particular places in the Holy Land, the Sioni Cathedral bears the name of Mount Zionat Jerusalem. It is commonly known as the "Tbilisi Sioni" to distinguish it from several other churches across Georgia bearing the name Sioni. According to medieval Georgian annals, the construction of the original church on this site was initiated by King Vakhtang Gorgasali in the 5th century. This early church was completely destroyed by Arabs, the cathedral was completely rebuilt by King David the Builder in 1112. The basic elements of the existing structure date from this period. Later centuries it was destroyed and rebuilt few times, Sioni Cathedral remained functional through Soviet times, and was partially renovated between 1980 and 1983. Now serves Georgian church.


Duration: 20 minutes

Stop At: Anchiskhati Basilica, Loane Shavteli, Tbilisi Georgia

The Anchiskhati Basilica of St Mary is the oldest surviving church in Tbilisi, Georgia. It belongs to the Georgian Orthodox Church and dates from the sixth century. According to the old Georgian annals, the church was built by the King Dachi of Iberia (522-534) who had made Tbilisi his capital. Originally dedicated to the Virgin Mary, it was renamed Anchiskhati in 1675 when the treasured icon of the Savior created by the twelfth-century goldsmith Beka Opizari at the Ancha monastery in Klarjeti was moved to Tbilisi so preserve it from an Ottoman invasion. The icon was preserved at the Basilica of St Mary for centuries (it is now on display at the Art Museum of Georgia). The basilica was damaged and rebuilt on several occasions from the 15th through 17th centuries due to wars between Georgia and the Persians and Turks. The brick belfry near the Anchiskhati Basilica was built by Catholicos Domenti in 1675. The look of the structure was drastically changed in the 1870s when a dome was added. During the Soviet period, all religious ceremonies at Anchiskhati Basilica were halted, and the building transformed into a museum for handicrafts. It was later used as an art studio. From 1958 to 1964 restoration works took place in celebration of the 1500th Jubilee of the founding of Tbilisi, which changed the view of the church back to the seventeenth-century version, however, it was not until 1991, after the independence of Georgia was restored, that the basilica reverted to religious use.


Duration: 20 minutes

Stop At: Old Town (Altstadt) Tbilisi, Tbilisi Georgia

Abanotubani is the ancient district of Tbilisi, Georgia, known for its sulfuric baths. Located at the eastern bank of the Mtkvari River at the foot of Narikala fort across Metekhisubani, Abanotubani is an important historic part of the city — the place, where according to a legend the King of Iberia, Vakhtang Gorgasali’s falcon fell, leading to a discovery of the hot springs and, subsequently, to founding of a new capital.


Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Saperavi Wine Cellar, Kutateladze Ap. st. 4, Tbilisi 0108 Georgia

During the day you'll have the chance to try the best sorts of Georgian wine and sweets. Wine degustation is included.

Duration: 1 hour

Pass By: Parliament of Georgia, 8 Shota Rustaveli Ave, T'bilisi 0118, Georgia

The building complex was constructed as the House of Government of Georgian SSR on the site of the demolished 19th-century Alexander Nevsky Cathedral and adjacent churchyard, with burials of the Georgian cadets killed during the Bolshevik invasion of 1921. It consists of two buildings; the "upper" building was designed by Viktor Kokorin and Giorgi Lezhava and built from 1933 to 1938. The "lower" building, along Rustaveli Avenue, was constructed by the same architects with an input from Vladimer Nasaridze from 1946 to 1953. The two buildings are connected with a courtyard, with staircases and fountains. The design of both buildings heavily uses elements of traditional Georgian architecture. The exterior facing the avenue is dominated by a monumental arcade, with massive eaves and "arch" pediment. The buildings are built of lightweight reinforced concrete, with exterior cladding of tufa rock, granite, and other materials.

Stop At: Shota Rustaveli Statue, Rustaveli Avenue, Tbilisi Georgia

Shota Rustaveli mononymously known simply as Rustaveli, was a medieval Georgian poet. He is considered to be the preeminent poet of the Georgian Golden Age and one of the greatest contributors to Georgian literature. Rustaveli is the author of The Knight in the Panther's Skin, which is considered to be a Georgian national epic poem.

Duration: 10 minutes

Stop At: New Agmashenebeli, 15 Giorgi Mazniashvili St, T'bilisi 0105, Georgia

David Agmashenebeli Avenue is one of the main avenues in the historical part of Tbilisi, known for its 19th-century classical architecture. The avenue is located on the left bank of the Kura River and runs from Saarbrücken Square to Giorgi Tsabadze street. Currently named after David IV of Georgia, it was originally called Mikheil Street in 1851, and Plekhanov Street after the Russian revolutionary Georgi Plekhanov from 1918 to 1988. Since 2010, the avenue has seen major rehabilitation works, which includes the renovation of seventy buildings, as well as the road, sidewalks and street lighting.

Duration: 1 hour
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Important Information
Departure Point
Sameba Church, Georgia
Duration
6h
Return Details
Marjanishvili Street, Tbilisi, Georgia
Inclusions
  • Bottled water
  • Snacks
  • Alcoholic Beverages - Wine degustation
  • All Fees and Taxes
  • Tour Guiding
  • Cultural Expedition
  • Fun and Joy
  • City sightseeing
  • Entry/Admission - Mother of Georgia
  • Entry/Admission - Saperavi Wine Cellar
Exclusions
  • Extra Alcohol
  • Personal Expenses
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Additional Info
  • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
  • A current valid passport is required on the day of travel
  • Not wheelchair accessible
  • Near public transportation
  • Most travelers can participate
  • This experience requires good weather. If it’s canceled due to poor weather, you’ll be offered a different date or a full refund
  • This is a private tour/activity. Only your group will participate
Cancellation Policy
All sales are final and incur 100% cancellation penalties.
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Key Details
  • Duration: 6h
  • Mobile Ticket Accepted
  • Instant confirmation
  • Languages Offered: English, Russian
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