Tours and Tickets

3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD provided by #1 BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS CO LTD - Serengeti Migration | Tanzania Safari | Kilimanjaro Hiking Company.

3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD

3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD
5
Book in advance
from
£688.28
per adult
Not sure? You can cancel this booking up to 24 hours in advance for a full refund.
About
Serengeti & Ngorongoro A combined safari to Serengeti and Ngorongoro Crater allows you to see the diverse topography and wildlife that East Africa offers. Make your way from Arusha through the adventurous roads of the hollowed-out Ngorongoro Crater, to Serengeti while seeing animals, birds, and reptiles along the way. You will come close to the Maasai culture as you will pass by one of their bomas have a time to see the huts try their garments and experience the culture.
Know before you go
  • Duration: 3 days
  • Mobile tickets accepted
  • Instant confirmation
Cancellation policy
  • For a full refund, cancel at least 24 hours in advance of the start date of the experience.
Available languages
German, English, French
Know before you go
  • Duration: 3 days
  • Mobile tickets accepted
  • Instant confirmation
Available languages
German, English, French
Cancellation policy
  • For a full refund, cancel at least 24 hours in advance of the start date of the experience.
Need help booking?
Call the number below and use the product code: 219441P22
Call +44 12 2492 8241
Important information
Inclusions
  • Dinner
  • Lunch
  • Breakfast
  • Dinner
  • Dinner
  • Lunch
  • Lunch
  • Breakfast
  • Breakfast
Exclusions
  • Flights, Tipping the crew, Visas & Hotel
Duration
3 days
Departure details
  • Traveller pickup is offered.
  • Arusha, Tanzania
  • Airports:
  • Arusha Airport, JJJF+QXJ, Arusha, Tanzania
  • Kilimanjaro International Airport, Kilimanjaro Airport Rd, Tanzania
  • Hotel pickup is offered. View the hotel list on our checkout page to see if yours is included among the pickup points.
Additional information
  • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
  • Not wheelchair accessible
  • Near public transportation
  • Infants must sit on laps
  • Most travellers can participate
  • This tour/activity will have a maximum of 200 travellers
Inclusions
  • Dinner
  • Lunch
  • Breakfast
  • Dinner
  • Dinner
  • Lunch
  • Lunch
  • Breakfast
  • Breakfast
Exclusions
  • Flights, Tipping the crew, Visas & Hotel
Departure details
  • Traveller pickup is offered.
  • Arusha, Tanzania
  • Airports:
  • Arusha Airport, JJJF+QXJ, Arusha, Tanzania
  • Kilimanjaro International Airport, Kilimanjaro Airport Rd, Tanzania
  • Hotel pickup is offered. View the hotel list on our checkout page to see if yours is included among the pickup points.
Duration
3 days
Return details
  • Returns to original departure point
Additional information
  • Confirmation will be received at time of booking
  • Not wheelchair accessible
  • Near public transportation
  • Infants must sit on laps
  • Most travellers can participate
  • This tour/activity will have a maximum of 200 travellers
Travel safe during COVID-19
What you can expect during your visit
  • Regular temperature checks for staff
  • Regularly sanitised high-traffic areas
  • Temperature checks for tour participants upon arrival
What you can expect during your visit
  • Regular temperature checks for staff
  • Regularly sanitised high-traffic areas
  • Temperature checks for tour participants upon arrival
  • Guides required to regularly wash hands
  • Hand sanitiser available to travellers and staff
  • Transportation vehicles regularly sanitised
  • Contactless payment for gratuities and add-ons
  • Face masks required for guides in public areas
  • Paid stay-at-home policy for staff with symptoms
  • Gear/equipment sanitised between use
  • Face masks required for travellers in public areas
  • Social distancing enforced throughout experience
  • Face masks provided for travellers
Itinerary
Overview
Full Map
4 stops
Day 1
Serengeti National Park (Tanzania)
Day 2
Serengeti National Park
Day 3
Ngorongoro National Park...
+
Popular mentions

5.0
5 reviews
Excellent
5
Very good
0
Average
0
Poor
0
Terrible
0

Chris C
9 contributions
TOTALLY RECOMMEND IF YOU LIKE ANIMALS
Sep 2021
5 Day Safari - Tarangire, Serengeti (2day), Ngorongoro, Manyara
Wow! Great service, accommodations, driver (Lyimo) with 20yrs experience. Got to see SOOOO many animals. They did everything for us to remember this as a lifetime highlight experience.
Private tour just me and the wife in a great, safari-specific large truck which was rugged yet super comfy.
We kept being surprised by the quality of the accommodations and the food in these remote locations.
The parks were amazing but would suggest to skip Manyara (or start with that park) due to the nature of the vegetation, it's more difficult to spot animals but we still managed to see a lioness in a tree :)
Burigi Chato was very flexible and trusting with payment arrangements. They even took care of excess baggage issues that we had. They are incredibly resourceful, kind and helpful.

TOTALLY RECOMMEND!
Written 3 October 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

John J
Germantown, TN7 contributions
Serengeti migration, my best experiance
Aug 2021 • Business
I had a magical experience with  Burigi chato safaris  when I decided to visit serengeti national park, it has always been a dream to me but I was travelling with a child and I wasn't sure if safari was the best vacation idea, but butigi chato safaris team made everything seem so easy. I was safely picked from the airport and my guide who was actually very kind by the way transferred us to our accommodation and we began our Tanzania Safari the next day, we first went to tarangire national park , which won my heart instantly because of its beautiful scenery  and the large herds of elephants that were scattered everywhere.  The next day we went direct to serengeti  and apart from the jaw dropping sight of the mammals fighting for their lives as they try to cross the grumeti river I saw a lot of other resident animals, I spent three days in serengeti with one night in western serengeti and  I commemorate burigi chato safaris for the best time I had. For anyone looking for a comfortable and safe Tanzania Safari arrangement, I suggest you immediately contact Burigu Chato Safaris, you won't be dissapointed .
Written 18 August 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

jonson
22 contributions
extraordinary Serengeti Migration tour
Feb 2021 • Business
This was truly blessed place, my superb camps and expert local guides brought me an authentic tour, everything was good and I saw the wildebeest, Zebra, Topi, antelope migrate from the vast. Thank you so much Burigi Chato safari for organizing and making my tour enjoyable.
Written 12 February 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

hospkin
South Africa7 contributions
Excellent
Dec 2020 • Friends
Burigi chato was an excellent company to work with for our safari and we could not have been happier Geoffrey was extremely responsive to any and all questions, they were on top of all details needed, and provided good fair price. We selected the 4 day safari and felt that time was perfect. Our guide Ruwa was perfect! Cannot recommend this enough!
Written 26 January 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Thank you dear John for choosing Burigi Chato Safaris to make your tour fabulous and amazing, also Thank you for booking with us with Maasai Cultural Tour, we believe that you enjoyed it enough with beautiful hospitality. Thank you. Also, Thanks for choosing the best offered all-inclusive Tanzania Safari`s Package which gave you a chance to explore, traverse and survey the best tourist attractions found in the northern, western, and lake zone part of Tanzania, that gave you a level of possibility to strike the main Tanzania National Parks thus includes; Serengeti Safari, Serengeti Wildebeest Migration Safari, Great Wildebeest Serengeti Migration Safari, Ngorongoro crater, Tarangire National Park, Lake Manyara, Arusha National Park, Burigi National Park, Mikumi Udzungwa, Ruaha National Park and the Day trip. -Serengeti Safari You found the opportunity to make a visit in the following sections -Serengeti Balloon You were able to explore the Serengeti experience and the majestic Serengeti from the sky. -Lake Manyara Tour You got a memorable Safari experience in lake Manyara National Park as we advised you to book your tour through a great tour operator(That’s Burgi Chato Safaris), where you were able to explore areas of the tree-climbing lion, see a large number of elephants, Observe the social baboons, enjoy the out of the Safari car experience and watch pink flamingos soar). - Lake Natron Tour Touring Lake Natron with us made you explore a variety of activities such as walking safaris, flamingo walks, volcano climbing, and cultural tours accompanied by beautiful exposure. -Ol doing lengai Hiking Also, this gave an opportunity to hike Ol Doinyo Lengai mostly known as the “Mountain of God” in the Maasai Language, it is an active volcano located in the Arusha region of Tanzania, Africa, a part of the volcanic system of East Africa Rift it unequally produces natrocarbonatite lava). -Lake Eyasi the Hadzabe Bushmen tour Also, you visited Lake Eyasi and interact with the Datoga and Hadzabe bushmen as the people who still live in Northern Central Tanzania live in harmony with each other and nature). -Shopping (Maasai craft and Tanzanite experience) It was our pleasure to take you to the best place to buy Maasai Traditional clothes known as Maasai Shuka, carvings, and Sovereign Tanzanite. -Mount Meru Hiking (you got time to climb and summit Mount Meru got experience of the fifth highest mountain on the African continent and the second highest in Tanzania that you never forget). -Mount Kilimanjaro Climbing You got the possibility of climbing up the highest and most famous summit in Tanzania, where climbing Kilimanjaro mountain gave and provided all you wanted to get to the mountain). however, climbing mount Kilimanjaro involves the following route to pass through to reach the top of the Kilimanjaro mountain ( At the summit), which are Machame route, Lemosho route, Marangu route, Rongai route, Umbwe route, and Northern circuit), but you choose the best route. - Materuni Waterfall/Coffee Tour We as the best Materuni Waterfall tour operator, we let you explore a place at which you may rest, refresh your mind and achieve your holiday, also you were able to know how to make a traditional coffee with amazing smell) -Marangu Waterfall/Coffee Tour/Cave Touring in Tanzania will not disappoint you ever, Marangu waterfall was also the best attractive area where you experienced stunning landscapes, went swimming, and thereafter got a chance to know the history of Chaga Cave. -Cheka(Kikuletwa)hot spring Tour, We let you experience a lot of Tanzania beauty, and saw the best natural water springs found in the Kilimanjaro region). -Kilimanjaro Bike Tour, (Burigi Chato Safaris as a tour operator made you experience a cycle safari around Moshi, explore the hot springs and waterfalls and the new place). -Moshi City Tour, We made you experience the beauty of Kilimanjaro city, cultural heritage, city tour, Hadzabe tribe, Materuni waterfalls, a coffee tour, and Kikuletwa Hot springs). -Zanzibar Tour You had a possibility to make a visit to the following tour area; -cheetah`s Rock(you explored and saw the way animals are resecured and contribute to the conservation), Nakupenda Beach You got the full experience and book a tour to refresh and explore amazing beauty and all about snorkeling and sunbathing on Zanzibar. Nungwi provision Island changed, Stone town This was one of the great local experiences that always attracts most visitors because of the totally amazing and all the incredible things to do there. space farm, Joan forest, Paje beach if am not mistaken, Paje was your main reason for having toured in Zanzibar because of a big and beautiful white sand beach boarded by a small-by-small village on one side and collection of beachfront accommodation service as well as turquoise waters on the other and the last area is Old dame market. Within the areas mentioned above you encountered various tasks or activities like; stone town walking tour, Zanzibar spice tour, Poison island tour, Mnemba snorkeling tour, dolphin tour, Nakupenda tour, Jambi ani village tour, and Safari blue.
Written 30 January 2021
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Tracie D
Wilmington, DE14 contributions
Birthday Safari and Adventure
Oct 2020
What an amazing trip! My friend and I picked a last minute (less than 30 days) trip to Tanzania in October/November 2020. We decided on a 3-day Safari which allowed us to visit Arusha National Park, Tarangire National Park and Ngorongoro Crater.

Our driver (Joseph) and our guide (Pascal) were a great pair. They worked really well together! I loved that if they were unsure of something, they researched the animal and provided us with the proper spelling and name of the animal.

They ensured that we were "okay" and even helped us practice some of our Swahili. We never felt unsafe nor in danger as two women travelers. The staff was always helpful.

I was always able to get the photographs I wanted of any animal or insect as they were very patient with my amateur photograph skills.

I would recommend this company and I'm hoping to go back next year for more adventures.
Written 15 November 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Hello! Tracy thank you for believing Burigi Chato Safaris as your Best tour operator, we are thankful for booking with us for Serengeti Migration Safari including Tarangire, Ngorongoro and Lake Manyara and trusting our great hospitality and we hoping that the next tour will be extraordinary fantastic and amazing, your welcome. Also, Thanks for choosing the best offered all-inclusive Tanzania Safari`s Package which gave you a chance to explore, traverse and survey the best tourist attractions found in the northern, western, and lake zone part of Tanzania, that gave you a level of possibility to strike the main Tanzania National Parks thus includes; Serengeti Safari, Serengeti Wildebeest Migration Safari, Great Wildebeest Serengeti Migration Safari, Ngorongoro crater, Tarangire National Park, Lake Manyara, Arusha National Park, Burigi National Park, Mikumi Udzungwa, Ruaha National Park and the Day trip. Surely you get to know this. Tanzania Serengeti Great Migration ABOUT SERENGETI MIGRATION Held as one of the Seven Wonders of the World, witnessing the Great Migration can be a life-changing experience. Have a preview experience in this wildebeest crossing video taken by our guest. We specialize in tailor-made great wildebeest migration safaris. The river crossing is the most-awaited phenomenon where millions of wildebeests move from one place to another in search of greener pastures. We have a vast network of accommodation providers from standard to luxury tented camps and lodges close to the Mara river, the heart of the action. Luxurious tents are available, which are complete with amenities such as, bathroom, spacious beds, food, even a bar. As you follow the Great Migration, you can also encounter herds of zebras and gazelles huddling across the plains and volcanic grasslands of the safari. This experience is packed with action, as migration herds attract predators like big cats, crocodiles, and hyenas. The Great Migration is once in a lifetime experience that lets you witness a wild safari and the real face of nature. It's a global phenomenon that happens only in a certain period of time within a year. Reach out to us if you want to experience the magic of the Great Migration yourself. The Serengeti forms the backdrop to one of the most breath-taking events in the entire animal kingdom – the annual great wildebeest migration. This is actually a year-long search for food by wildebeest, with accompanying herds of zebra and gazelle. The migration usually follows a clock-wise direction, but is guided by rain and the growth of grass; at any time the animals can ignore tradition and follow the rain clouds. There are three seasons in the Serengeti: the short rains, long rains and dry season. Usually around about mid-October, just before the short rains of November and December, the large wildebeest and zebra herds leave the Mara in Kenya (near our sister camp at Mara Bushtops) and travel east and south around the Gol Mountains and into the short grass plain of the southern and eastern Serengeti. During the short rains, pregnant females often migrate through the central Serengeti to the southern plains to begin calving, as their milk benefits from grass high in calcium and magnesium. Wildebeest calving can begin any time between January and March. More than 750,000 females will drop their calves within a three week period, so predator/prey activity is at a peak. April is usually the month of long rain, meaning heavier, longer downpours. The herd usually begins to move to the central Serengeti, preparing for the wildebeest rut in May and June. This creates some of the most amazing herd sightings, as male and females herds reunite for breeding. The herd movement continues west and north between May and (usually) the end of July, when the herd disperses: males without females may migrate directly north to the Mara, but some remain in the Western Corridor, staying put for the rest of the year. The majority of the herd then leave the Serengeti by the end of July, if rains are normal. The dry season of July-October remains excellent for game viewing, particularly as big cats prey on the large herds which can still be seen in the northern Serengeti along the Mara River. Cat viewing can actually be at its best during the dry season, since they have to stay active during the daytime in the search for dwindling food. Discover the famous wildebeest migration river crossings As for witnessing the famous wildebeest river crossings, these usually occur between June and November. Herds often cross into the Mara, then return to the Serengeti before once more moving back to the Mara during this period. No one can predict exactly when or where, but equally, no one is better placed than us at Serengeti Bushtops: if it happens while you are with us, we’ll do all in our power to get you a ringside seat. The Great Wildebeest Migration is a spectacular event where 2 million grazers circle the Serengeti all year round in search for fresh pastures. Some months are better than others to see the herds. The best times are when they are the most concentrated in certain areas: From July – October the herds are crossing the Mara River in the northern Serengeti. This is where you get those dramatic Attenborough-esque scenes of wildebeest hurtling themselves into crocodile infested waters. February is when calving season is in full swing and this is the best time to see the herds in their full glory as they gather in their thousands on the endless plains of the south. February is the only time of year you are guaranteed to see the herds if you stay where they are predicted to be, as they never fail to gather in the Ndutu plains at this time of year. We would advise visiting the Serengeti at these times if the Migration is on your bucket list. However, the Migration is a complex and unpredictable event. It is important to know the pros and cons for each time of year, which you can find in our month-by-month migration blogs on our chart to the right. Best Time For Tanzania Serengeti Migration There is no single ‘migration season’ as the Great Migration is, in fact, an eternal annual cycle from place to place, year in and year out. However, depending on either the aspect of the Great Migration you want to witness (such as river crossings), or the time of year that you would like to travel, your safari can be tailored to give you the best chance of seeing what you desire. Whether the great herds are calving in the south or on the move north in search of greener pastures – and then back again – there is a huge variety of astounding scenes unfolding before you. Serengeti National Park offers extraordinary wildlife viewing opportunities throughout the year – you just need to know when to go where to admire one of nature’s last remaining true spectacles: the Great Migration. For example, winter is the best time to see the herd in Southern Serengeti, while the Western Corridor and Northern Serengeti are the best places to spend the summer and autumn months. It’s worth bearing in mind that - also in this part of the world - nature will be its unpredictable self. Hence, chance plays a big part in witnessing the iconic river crossing when two million animals cross a river with rapids jostling their bodies and crocs snapping at their hooves. That being said, when choosing the right part of the Serengeti in the right period, large herds are usually easily spotted and there is a fair chance of seeing a spectacular migrational movement. Migration Seasons January - March: The Calving Continues The herds congregate on the short grass plains of the southern Serengeti and westernmost regions of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. An estimated 500 000 calves are born during a two- to three-week window in February. This mass calving draws a staggering number of predators eager to prey on the vulnerable newborns. • Dec / Jan – The Southern Plains are lush with fresh, sweet grasses for the wildebeest to graze on. The areas around Ndutu and the northern Ngorongoro Conservation Area are where the herds will spend some time enjoying the abundant grazing in preparation for the birth of the new calves. • February – Between late January and mid-March over 80% of fertile female wildebeest drop their calves within a few weeks of each other. Over 500,000 tiny wildebeest dot the plains and the predators swoop in to feast on the easy prey. • March – At this time, the wildebeest are still occupying the southern area of the Park but preparing to move north as the plains dry out. April to mid-June: The Trek North and The Rut As the rains come to an end and the ground dries, the herds start making their way north into the central Serengeti where the grass is still fresh and they can graze and tend their young. Moving slowly, they graze as they go, making the most of the fresh grass. Mating season begins and the male wildebeest do fierce battle for a mate. Throughout the rut, the journey continues as some herds head west into the Western Corridor and cross the Grumeti River. • April – The wildebeest begin their long trek north, through the central area of the park. The herds move at leisure, grazing as they go along. Where to see the Great Migration The backdrop of this dramatic spectacle is the Greater Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem – an area that covers both Kenya and Tanzania. The northernmost reaches of the great migration’s circuitous route crosses the Masai Mara in Kenya before heading southwards through the Serengeti in Tanzania, as far south as to border on the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. When to visit Serengeti National Park Serengeti National Park offers extraordinary wildlife viewing opportunities throughout the year – you just need to know when to go where to admire one of nature’s last remaining true spectacles: the Great Migration. For example, winter is the best time to see the herd in Southern Serengeti, while the Western Corridor and Northern Serengeti are the best places to spend the summer and autumn months. It’s worth bearing in mind that - also in this part of the world - nature will be its unpredictable self. Hence, chance plays a big part in witnessing the iconic river crossing when two million animals cross a river with rapids jostling their bodies and crocs snapping at their hooves. That being said, when choosing the right part of the Serengeti in the right period, large herds are usually easily spotted and there is a fair chance of seeing a spectacular migrational movement. The Serengeti Wildebeest Migration: January to December HIGHLIGHTS Introducing our Month-By-Month Guide to The Serengeti’s Wildebeest Migration Please see the links below for our month-by-month detailed blog posts: January; Southern Serengeti & Ndutu Plains February; Southern Serengeti & Ndutu Plains. March; Southern Serengeti & Ndutu Plains and later in the month combine with Seronera (central Serengeti) April; Southern Serengeti & Ndutu Plains and combine with Seronera (central Serengeti) May; Southern Serengeti & Ndutu Plains and combine with Seronera (central Serengeti) June; Seronera (central Serengeti) and combine with western corridor (Grumeti) July; Kogatende and Lamai (Northern Serengeti) August; Kogatende and Lamai (Northern Serengeti) September; Kogatende and Lamai (Northern Serengeti) October; Kogatende and Lamai (Northern Serengeti) November; Kogatende and Lamai (Northern Serengeti) and combine with Seronera (central Serengeti) later in the month December; Southern Serengeti & Ndutu Plains and later in the month combine with Seronera (central Serengeti) SEASON BY SEASON (MONTH BY MONTH) SERENGETI MIGRATION (A) THE GREAT MIGRATION IN JANUARY, FEBRUARY AND MARCH Around January each year, the migration will be finishing a southwards trek, moving along the eastern edge of the Serengeti and into the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. Here the plains are rich in nutritious grass, providing the herds with the best conditions for raising their newborn calves. Although there is no real beginning or end to this migratory circuit – other than birth and death – it seems reasonable to call the wildebeests’ birthing season the start of the migration. Around late-January or February, the herds occupy the short-grass plains that spread over the lower northern slopes of the Ngorongoro Crater highlands and around Olduvai Gorge. Some 400,000 calves are born here within a period of two to three weeks - some 8,000 new calves every day. The abundance of vulnerable young calves means the surrounding predators also spring into action, hunting with ease due to the sheer numbers of wildebeest. Those interested in witnessing calving and the drama of big cats on the hunt should look to migration camps in the southern Serengeti and arroung Ndutu Area in Ngorongoro Conservation Area. (i). January The wildebeest spread out across the short grass plains of Tanzania's Southern Serengeti and northern Ngorongoro conservation area - if the land could support them year round, the wildebeest would never leave this lush, green landscape. Where are the herds in January? By January, most of the herds have congregated in the Ndutu Plains for calving season. Ndutu is in the Ngorongoro Conservation area which means rich, nutrient soils for the young calves to give them the best start in life. By mid-January, calving season is in full swing and more than 8,000 calves are born daily. Aside from the sheer volume of grazers in the area which is phenomenal to see in itself, the young calves also attract an immense number of predators. In fact, from January to February, the Ndutu plains has the biggest concentration of predators anywhere on the planet, which only means one thing; seriously explosive predator action. Is January a good time to see the Great Migration? So yes, January is one of the absolute best times to see the Migration in herds of thousands, though they do tend to be even more congregated in February so if your dates are flexible we would recommend maybe looking at visiting a bit later if possible… If you are set on January though, look at going towards the end of the month. This way, you will avoid peak, peak prices over the festive period and the crowds that come with it. By visiting later in the month, you will also have the best chance of catching the big herds, as by this time the majority will definitely be fully into calving season creating spectacular wildlife viewing opportunities. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in January? The Ndutu Plains! If you are going in very early January though, really want to catch the mega herds, have a long Serengeti safari, and maybe want to stay in some more permanent accommodation options, then you could also consider combining a central Serengeti permanent camp with one in the Ndutu Plains in the south. The Ndutu area doesn’t actually have any permanent camps, and it is the home of the mobile one, so if you really want the permanent camp experience then you have no choice but to look to Seronera (though most of these, although permanent, are still under canvas!). (ii) February Over a period of about three weeks in February, several hundred thousand calves are born. Pregnant wildebeest give birth more or less simultaneously so expect to see calves from a few hours, to a few days old while on game drives. You might even witness a birth - unlike other antelope, wildebeest do not hide their newborns but encourage them to get on their feet immediately and join the herd where there is safety in numbers. Where are the herds in February? We can’t stress enough that February is the only time of year that you are pretty much guaranteed to see the huge wildebeest herds if you stay in the right area. In February, the place to be is the Ndutu region of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area (towards the south of the Serengeti). In Ndutu, there are not any permanent camps/lodges, so the place to stay is in a mobile tented camp. Is February a good time to see the Great Migration? Yes, absolutely – if your priority is seeing a mega herd of wildebeest and some excellent predator sightings, there is no better time to go. The only down side to this time of year is that you cannot see the Mara River crossings which have made the Migration so famous, as these only happen from July through to October in the northern Serengeti plains. But we don’t see this as a down side really – calving season in February is seriously cool to see, and the whole migration experience is completely different. Here, you can expect flat endless plains dotted with millions of brown wildebeest shaped specks, stretching as far as the eye can see. February is the best time to go to get the full impact of the sheer volume of animals involved in the migration with the back drop of the classic endless Serengeti plains. (iii) March There is a very high probability of witnessing a kill on a game drive in this period. The calves are easy prey for Africa's big predators: lions, cheetahs, leopards, spotted hyenas, and rare wild dogs. Where are the herds in March? At the beginning of the month, many herds are still in the Ndutu area of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area and the southern Serengeti plains, and though January and February are technically the calving season months, it often continues well into March. Even if calving season is mostly over, the chances are the herds will linger in the nutrient rich grasses of the southern plains. If you are travelling in the beginning two weeks of March, we would therefore suggest basing yourself in a mobile camp in this area, as you would in January and February. Towards the end of the month, Tanzania’s heavy rains can begin, which means the wildebeest disperse, often covering more ground out to the west towards Maswa Game Reserve, and around the Moru Kjopes (just south of the centre of the park) and on to the western Gol region. Towards the end of the month, you could look at combining locations; one camp in the Ndutu area and another just south of the Seronera region in either Moru (south, towards the east of centre) or Namiri (south west of centre) for your best chances of catching the herds. If you are looking to see the mega herds, we would therefore suggest visiting at the beginning of the month, rather than the end. Going in March could mean you may get wet as the rains are sometimes early (and sometimes late!), but if you don’t mind getting a bit stuck in the mud and aren’t looking for a Zanzibar beach extension, this can all be part of an unforgettable adventure. Is March a good time to see the Great Migration? Yes! In our view, March is an excellent time to visit for a few reasons. Firstly, you avoid the peak season prices of February, and the chances are, if you are going at the beginning of the month you will get a very similar experience. Going in March also means you avoid the crowds, especially at the end of the month. If you really want a Serengeti safari all to yourself and don’t mind if you potentially get a bit wet, a March safari is for you. If your absolute focus is on seeing the huge Migration herds, you don’t want any rain, and you don’t mind paying a premium then consider February… Though we are convinced that for a fraction of the cost, and early March safari is definitely worthwhile. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in March? In the first half of the month, stay in the Ndutu region of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, and the southern Serengeti plains. In the second half of the month, if you have a short time do exactly the same as in the first few weeks. If you have a bit longer though, it may be worth combining a camp in the Ndutu area, with one around the Moru Kjopes, Namiri Plains or Central Serengeti. Both Ndutu and these more central areas have phenomenal resident wildlife. (B) THE GREAT MIGRATION IN APRIL AND MAY After bearing their young in February and March, around April the wildebeest herds begin to drift north-west towards the fresher grass of the central Serengeti, drawing with them thousands of zebra and smaller groups of antelope. By May, columns of wildebeest stretch for several kilometres as the animals start to congregate by the Moru Kopjes, few camps in the Serengeti that offers migration viewing at this time of year. Mating season begins towards the end of May and male wildebeest battle head-to-head. Throughout 'the rut', the journey continues at leisure, with the wildebeest, zebra and gazelle grazing as they go along. Gradually, the movement gathers momentum and the wildebeest start to mass in the Serengeti’s Western Corridor. At this time of year, Migration Camp will have relocated to follow the migration and provide access to watch the wildebeest cross the Grumeti River. The herds form in huge numbers along the pools and channels of the river, which they have to cross in order to continue on their journey. This may not be as spectacular as the famous Mara crossings, but there are still enough wildebeest to provide the Grumeti crocs with a veritable feast. It is worth noting that May is low season, Burigi Chato Safaris at this time offer great value, since there are relatively low numbers of tourists in the Serengeti yet the wildlife viewings remain excellent. (i) April April marks the start of the wildebeest migration. In April, the waterholes start to dry up and the southern Serengeti plains have been mowed to stubble by more than a million wildbeest, zebra and gazelle grazing there. As a result, small herds gradually merge into vast columns of wildebeest on the march – it’s a spectacular sight: the mega herd covers the vast plain to the horizon. Where are the herds in April? Although rainfall can make the herds spread out a bit, the migration in April is fairly similar to the previous few months. You will most likely not catch calving season, but most of the wildebeest will linger around the southern plains of Kusini and Ndutu as they do in March. Although some would have dispersed to the east, west and a little bit north, many will still be in the Ndutu region. As you can tell, as the rains come the wildebeest’s movements can be difficult to predict. Therefore we would suggest staying south, as we know they have a tendency to linger throughout the month, but we don’t know exactly which particular direction the big herds will head to! Is April a good time to see the Great Migration? If you don’t mind getting a bit wet and want to save on some of our favourite lodges, then yes! However, this is not the time to catch humongous, concentrated herds which are prominent in high season. However, they are still there and in some years can be just as concentrated in the Ndutu plains as they are in the height of February’s calving season… Ndutu region has exceptional resident cats, and it can get busy in the peak months of January and February, but in April the Serengeti is like a ghost town. This means if you don’t mind getting a bit wet occasionally, you can have an exceptional slice of African wilderness all to yourself, which is very special. The rains bring dramatic clouds, lightening and dramatic sunsets… Oh, and you can stay in some of our favourite camps for a fraction of the price they are in high season. We would recommend travelling at this time if you don’t mind getting wet, love exceptional value for money, dramatic scenery and some excellent wildlife viewing. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in April? Stay in Ndutu throughout the month as the wildebeest do linger, even if most have pushed east, west and north. Throughout the month, if you would like the best chance of seeing the Migration then combine Ndutu with an area of the central Serengeti as you would in late March. Also, many mobile camps close at this time, so most of your options are located in the central area of the park where the camps are permanent and thus have a more rigid structure to weather the storm. (ii) May Adult wildebeest come into season simultanously – this ensures they give birth in a mass calving in February, which offers their newborns the safety of numbers. The result is spectacular: breeding males bellow and grunt to advertise their presence, chase off rivals and try to round up females to keep them from wandering off. Calves and their mothers call to each other constantly so they don't get separated, raising a magnificent cacophony unlike anything else in Africa. By May, the herds have usually reached the short-grass plains of the mid Serengeti and are heading in the general direction of the Seronera Valley in Tanzania. Where are the herds in May? May is the first big push of the year from the wildebeest, as they head ultimately for the Mara River in the north. Around this time, the best place to see the big herds is usually the central Serengeti region of Seronera. Towards the end of the month, a lot of the herds can be heading up the Western corridor around the Grumeti region. It is probably therefore best after the 15th to combine these two regions at this time of year if you are absolutely set on seeing the migration. The problem in April and May, is that as there are heavy rains around the whole Serengeti, the herds do tend to disperse somewhat, so predicting where the big herds will be is tricky as they simply cover more ground. Is May a good time to see the Great Migration? May is classically not the best time to see the Migration due to the rain dispersing the herds, also because it is a very transitional month, meaning the location of the wildebeest is difficult to predict. However, alike with April, visiting in May means you do benefit from low season prices in a very quiet time of year to be in the Serengeti. You can take full advantage of the permanent and often more expensive central Serengeti camps for half the price, and with no one else around, making it an attractive month for a certain type of traveller. So for the weathered safari enthusiast, May is a fantastic time to be in the Serengeti and hopefully catch a big migration herd without anyone else around at all. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in May? In the first half of May, we would recommend basing yourself in the central Serengeti region of Seronera and in the second half of the month, we would suggest combining a camp here with one towards the western corridor. The western corridor is where the herds classically are in June, though some can often arrive early (or late!). Basing yourself in two locations though will give you the best chance of catching the herds in these more transitional months. Also, because the Serengeti is so quiet at this time of year, you have more of a chance of being provided with a free of charge private vehicle, which means you have the freedom to go out for longer drives if the wildebeest herds are not in the immediate area. (D) THE GREAT MIGRATION IN JUNE AND JULY During June, the dry season starts, with large concentrations of wildebeest in the Western Serengeti and on the southern banks of the Grumeti River. Each migrating animal must face the challenge of crossing the crocodile-infested river - the first of many daunting and tense river encounters. As June moves into July, the hundreds of thousands of wildebeest and zebra continue to head north along the western edge of the park towards an even riskier barrier: the Mara River in the north of the Serengeti. These river crossings are arguably one of the most exciting wildlife events on Earth; they usually start at the onset of high season in July, but timing all depends on nature. During July, the herds will typically be found in the Northern Serengeti, where access is provided by mobile migration camps Later in July, those animals that have successfully made it across the Mara River will also be found in Kenya’s Masai Mara. At this time, daily river crossings can be seen at the Mara and Talek rivers – both often central to incredible scenes. (i) June Where are the herds in June? The transitional period we see in May continues throughout June. By June, usually around 20% of the herds are in the western Grumeti region as they face their first obstacle on their journey; the Grumeti River. These are not where those famous huge river crossings happen though, which happens later on when the herds have reached the north of the park, and ultimately the Mara River. The weather at this time of year can be difficult to predict, and therefore so can the wildebeest. As the rains change, the herds can double back on themselves, some may make their way to the central Serengeti, whilst others will linger for most the month in the Western Corridor, whilst a few may push north early. It is a very testing time for us to predict as it does change from year to year. Is June a good time to see the Great Migration? If you catch the herds, then absolutely, this is a phenomenal time to see the migration. Rutting season for the males begin in April and June is the peak of this period, which involves a lot of noise and is a very interesting time to be in the midst of the herds. Although it is tricky to predict, if you base yourself in two different camps (which we would strongly recommend you do) then you have a good chance of catching some big herds. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in June? We would definitely suggest throughout the whole of June splitting your time between two camps; one in the central Seronera region and the other in the western corridor. There are a few mobile camps which are situated in the Grumeti (west) region throughout June, and couple this with a more permanent lodge in the Seronera region means you get the best of both worlds in terms of accommodation style, whilst also maximizing your chances of seeing the herds. (ii) July Waterholes on the Serengeti plains continue to dry out as winter advances, while over a million wildebeest grazing soon crops the grasslands to stubble. The herds must keep moving, heading north in search of food and water. Where are the herds in July? July has always classically been the month which sees the first of the mega Mara River crossings. It is another big movement month for the herds, as many that were lingering in the western corridor make their way north in search of greener pastures. In the first few weeks of the month it can be a mistake to solely focus on the north and the potential of a river crossing as they can often not arrive there until mid-July. Is July a good time to see the Great Migration? If your priority is to see a river crossing, and if you are in the north and near the Mara River when the wildebeest have arrived, then absolutely, July is an incredible time to see the herds. However, we would always say that if you go a bit later then you will maximise your chances of seeing the river crossings. This is because if the herds are late, if you go in August the chances are they will definitely be in the northern Kogatende region by this point. However, July is tricky because you never know when the first herds are actually going to arrive. Once they have arrived though, river crossings can happen daily – it is not something that just happens one week and is over the next. Once the wildebeest reach the Mara River they linger, some cross in herds of thousands, one may suddenly then the next day decide to cross back, and 100 may follow. They graze in Kogatende and the Lamai Wedge (with the Mara River dividing these two areas) and will often linger until late October around this area. So, if the herds have made it then July is a fantastic time to see the migration. The first crossings of the season are often seriously explosive with the crocs being hungry, and the wildebeest acting very manic. As such, the first crossings leave a trail of carcasses behind them so although you should stay relatively close to the river, being on the banks can be a mistake! We would recommend visiting in late July though, so even if the herds are a bit late, the chances are they would have reached the north of the park when you are there. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in July? To maximize your chances of seeing the Migration in early July, as they may be late in their cycle and still lingering around the western corridor, we would recommend first going to a camp in the west, and then moving on to one in the north in the hope of catching a river crossing. In the second half of July, we would recommend solely focusing on the north, as it is pretty unlikely that by this late none of the herds would have reached the Mara River and the surrounding Kogatende area. (e) THE GREAT MIGRATION IN AUGUST, SEPTEMBER AND OCTOBER The migration heads north out of the central Serengeti, splitting into two routes. The main group heads into the western corridor crossing the Grumeti River in spectacular stampedes. Enormous crocodiles wait patiently to snatch wildebeest as they surge across the river. The wildebeest continue to move steadily across the Grumeti region, making another perilous river crossing to cross the Mara River and reach the lush grazing in Kenya's Masai Mara. The smaller group heads directly north from the central Serengeti into the northern plains and from there into the Masai Mara, avoiding the river crossings. By August, the herds have faced the challenge of crossing the Mara River and are spread throughout the Masai Mara's northern region, with many remaining in the northern Serengeti. In years when the river is in full flow, the panic and confusion at the crossings – combined with waiting predators and surging currents – can cause massive loss of life. But, even in years of relatively gently flowing water, the crocs take their toll – not to mention the lions and other large predators that patrol the banks, ready to ambush any wildebeest that make it to the other side. There is no single crossing: at some spots, there are just a few individuals, while others see a mass of animals moving without break for hours. By September to October, the main chaos has ended and the migrating columns have gradually moved eastwards. However, the wildebeest will face the heavy waters of the Mara River once more as they prepare to cross once again for their return journey southwards. (i) August Where are the herds in August? The herds in August are up in the north, crossing the Mara River between Kogatende and the Lamai Wedge. This is peak time to see the river crossings because even if the wildebeest are late, they will have reached the Kogatende area by this time. If they are early, and arrive north in June, they will still be lingering here and in the Masai Mara throughout August and through to October Win, win. All the way through the month, river crossings should happen almost daily it is all a case of waiting patiently for the wildebeest to decide to cross. You would be very unlucky for the wildebeest not to be surrounding the Mara River if you decide to go in August. On the flip side though, you would also be lucky to see a crossing, as not everyone does, as no matter how many hours are spent waiting with a herd by the river banks, they may simply not decide to cross over for hours! Is August a good time to see the Great Migration? Yes, August is one of the very best times to be in the Serengeti because this is peak season for the mighty Mara River crossings in the north. At the beginning of August, as the main herds approach, you can be in for some huge crossings. Like with July, the first crossings of the season can be explosive, with wildebeest falling left right and centre, trampling each other or being taken down by the hungry waiting Mara River cross. The only downside of visiting in August is that because it is so popular, you do not benefit from any special offers from camps and lodges, and the crossing points can be busy as it is peak season. If you were to go in September for instance, you would avoid there being so many vehicles. That being said, even in peak season the Serengeti is much quieter than the Masai Mara river crossings (as the Mara River cuts through both). So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in August? You should solely focus on the Kogatende and Lamai areas in the northern Serengeti throughout August. It is too much of a good time to see the crossings not to base yourself in these areas. Many head for the Masai Mara, but as well as it being a lot busier than the northern Serengeti, the Migration is always in Kogatende/Lamai from the time they reach the Mara River, up until when they head south again, whereas, only sometimes at some point within this time are river crossings also happening in Masai Mara. It is not integral to their route. All in all, we would therefore head for northern Serengeti as opposed to the Masai Mara to catch the crossings. Lamai does tend to be a bit quieter than Kogatende, though both are excellent and there is a bit more choice of accommodation on the southern side of the Mara River at Kogatende. (ii) September Where are the herds in September? In September, the herds are pretty much in an identical position to where they are in August, in the Lamai wedge and Kogatende areas of the northern Serengeti, as well as sometimes up in the Masai Mara too. Many people think that the Masai Mara is the place to be at this time, but that is simply not true, as the wildebeest tend to pour out into Kenya as an extension of their route, and as such, entering the Mara is not an integral part of their journey. So all in all, you should be looking at the Serengeti over the Mara for the river crossings. Is September a good time to see the Great Migration? Many people think that August is a better time to see the river crossings, as it is peak season throughout all the northern lodges and mobile camps. However, we would argue that this is not true. By going in September you can take advantage of some fabulous free night deals, as well as being in with the same chance as seeing the crossings as in August. In September, you benefit from school holidays being over and thus a few less vehicles around. Also, when compared to July, we would argue that September is a better time to almost guarantee seeing the migration in the north. This is because the wildebeest can be late, so July is a slightly trickier time to predict, whereas if you go in September though, you are pretty much guaranteed to see the herds as they absolutely will have arrived in the north by this time and always linger well into September. Contrary to popular belief, once the herds arrive in the north, they do not simply head straight for the Masai Mara then head south, but they linger river-crossing over back and forth through the Mara River – it is not a single mass movement, but more a chaotic gathering which can mean river crossings happen daily from July all the way through until late October. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in September? Northern Serengeti! Lamai and Kogatende are the place to be if you are hoping to catch the crossings and the migration herds in general. It is important to remember that when the wildebeest are crossing the Mara River in between Kogatende and Lamai in the Serengeti, they are only sometimes also crossing the Mara River on the Kenyan side! As the Masai Mara is a smaller area and with a lot of camps, it is also much busier here than in the Serengeti, so we would always recommend avoiding Kenya within the migration river crossing months of July – October and focusing on the northern Serengeti. October to November The sheer number of wildebeest arriving in the Masai Mara area is staggering, as is the variety of resident wildlife - zebra, giraffe, buffalo, elephant, hyena, lion, eland and gazelle to name a few. From August until the summer rains start in November, the Masai Mara is lush and green, and offers the best game viewing in Africa. Once the rains start and the wildebeest have recovered their strength, they begin moving south to their Serengeti breeding grounds which are green and lush once more. (j). October Where are the herds in October? As with August and September, the herds are yet again in a pretty identical position in the northern Serengeti areas of Kogatende and Lamai, and in the Masai Mara. There is a chance in late October that the light rains will come a bit early and therefore push the herds south, however, this takes a long time as there are so many of them! The chances are even if you are visiting the north in late October, that a good few of the herds will still be lingering in the north. Is October a good time to see the Great Migration? Contrary to popular belief, early – mid October is still a phenomenal time to see the river crossings and so is even late October. Even if the light rains do come a bit early in late October and the herds do begin to push south, this takes a long time as there are so many of them. The chances are even if you are visiting the north in late October that a good few of the herds will still be lingering in the north and crossing the Mara River in between Kogatende and Lamai. October is an even quieter time of year than September and August to see the crossings and there are some seriously good deals in our favourite camps. In the office, we are forever torn, but many of us will say that October is our favourite time to see the migration. Aside from the park being quieter, it is desperately dry at this time of year, so the game viewing throughout the Serengeti is phenomenal as the animals congregate to the water areas. October is also a great time to catch some unbelievable predator action. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in October? In the northern Serengeti in Kogatende or the Lamai Wedge if you are looking to catch some river crossings. You should not anticipate their move south in your choice of camp, as river crossings are still happening and should not be missed if you are in the Serengeti at this time of year. The Masai Mara is still busy at this time of year, as it is a smaller area with a lot of camps, so we would always recommend sticking to the Serengeti in between July and November if you are looking to catch the migration. It is worth noting too that the wildebeest are always in the northern Serengeti from when they arrive up in the north until they leave for south again, whereas they are only sometimes in the Masai Mara at this time. Visiting Kenya is not integral to their route, but more of an offshoot from their main Serengeti path. They don’t see the country border and think “we must go to Kenya!” – it is just an extension of their circular route which essentially revolves around the Serengeti. THE GREAT MIGRATION IN NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER After the East African short rains in late October and early November, the wildebeest move down from Kenya and into the eastern limits of the Serengeti past Namiri Plains, an area known for outstanding cheetah sightings. By December, they are spread throughout the eastern and southern reaches. In the early months of the new year, the grasses in the deep south of the Serengeti are lush with rain. This draws the herds – not only of wildebeest, but also hundreds of thousands of zebra and other plains animals. The cycle continues as the calving season starts once again. (i) November In late October and November the herds start their second Great Migration south towards the fertile lands of the Ndutu plains where the rains will have rejuvenated the grasses since the herds were last there earlier in the year. This can be a tricky time to catch the mega herd, as it covers vast distances every day. However, this is not set in stone as one of our team caught this mega crossing in November a few year. Where are the herds in September? In September, the herds are pretty much in an identical position to where they are in August, in the Lamai wedge and Kogatende areas of the northern Serengeti, as well as sometimes up in the Masai Mara too. Many people think that the Masai Mara is the place to be at this time, but that is simply not true, as the wildebeest tend to pour out into Kenya as an extension of their route, and as such, entering the Mara is not an integral part of their journey. So all in all, you should be looking at the Serengeti over the Mara for the river crossings. Is September a good time to see the Great Migration? Many people think that August is a better time to see the river crossings, as it is peak season throughout all the northern lodges and mobile camps. However, we would argue that this is not true. By going in September you can take advantage of some fabulous free night deals, as well as being in with the same chance as seeing the crossings as in August. In September, you benefit from school holidays being over and thus a few less vehicles around. Also, when compared to July, we would argue that September is a better time to almost guarantee seeing the migration in the north. This is because the wildebeest can be late, so July is a slightly trickier time to predict, whereas if you go in September though, you are pretty much guaranteed to see the herds as they absolutely will have arrived in the north by this time and always linger well into September. Contrary to popular belief, once the herds arrive in the north, they do not simply head straight for the Masai Mara then head south, but they linger criss-crossing over back and forth through the Mara River – it is not a single mass movement, but more a chaotic gathering which can mean river crossings happen daily from July all the way through until late October. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in September? Northern Serengeti! Lamai and Kogatende are the place to be if you are hoping to catch the crossings and the migration herds in general. It is important to remember that when the wildebeest are crossing the Mara River in between Kogatende and Lamai in the Serengeti, they are only sometimes also crossing the Mara River on the Kenyan side! As the Masai Mara is a smaller area and with a lot of camps, it is also much busier here than in the Serengeti, so we would always recommend avoiding Kenya within the migration river crossing months of July – October and focusing on the northern Serengeti. (ii) December Where are the herds in December? December is a notoriously tricky month to predict. The November short rains disperse the wildebeest herds across the Serengeti as they head south in preparation for calving season, which kicks of towards the end of the month and lasts through until March. Generally, the main herds may linger in Namiri Plains (just south east of the central Serengeti region, Seronera) or in Kusini which is towards the south west of the central area. Some as early as December may have already made it to the fertile Ndutu plains in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area in preparation for calving season. Is December a good time to see the Great Migration? December is a very popular time to be in Tanzania, due to the beginning of the calving season, but also because East Africa (Kenya and Tanzania) is by far the best place to be in Africa over the festive period as it is mainly dry and the wildlife is excellent. This means that although December is a somewhat transitional month for the migration, the park is still going to be busy with tourists seeking an adventurous Christmas period (but only towards the end of the month)! If you want to avoid the crowds and peak season prices, go before the 20th December. Because of the November rains, the wildebeest disperse as they have plentiful grass to eat so you are less likely to get those huge condensed herds which are so fabulous in the dry season. If your dates are slightly more flexible look at early December to avoid peak, peak season prices which you get from around 20th December up until the 7th of January and also to avoid the Christmas crowds. If The Great Migration herds are your absolute priority and you are looking for a wintery break but have flexible dates, to get the most dramatic condensed Migration scenes, you should look to February. February is the only month when the herds are ALWAYS where we think they will be, in the Ndutu area of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. So, where should I stay to get the best chance of catching the herds in December? We would say that from 1st – 15th December you should be looking at the areas in the central Serengeti region. You could look at either Moru (just south of the centre), Kusini (further south west of the centre) or in the Seronera region itself (the centre!) where the more permanent camps are located (ones which stay here throughout the year, and do not move locations to follow the migration). As December is a more transitional month and the herds tend to be scattered across central and into the southern Serengeti, it is important not only to consider where the migration may or may not be, but also what style of camp suits you the most. For the later dates in December, we would urge you to consider two locations – one in the central Serengeti area (as above) and another in the Ndutu area of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area (very south of the park), for a chance of catching the start of calving season. Here are our picks for the best camps to stay in for the Migration in December… It’s essential to plan your migration safari well in advance if you want to be in the best place at the right time to witness the river crossings or make the most of the Masai Mara’s high season – talk to us today.We’ll tailor make your migration safari around your preferences and interests, but since this is one of Africa’s most popular attrractions, it’s essential to plan your safari well in advance MORE TO KNOW ABOUT THE CAVING SEASON OF ‘’THE GREAT SERENGETI MIGRATION’’ For many people, the thought of the Great Wildebeest Migration brings to mind images of thunderous river crossings with crocodiles snatching at the heels of wildebeest as they make their way across East Africa’s rivers. Action-packed river crossings are one of the highlights of the annual Great Wildebeest Migration Others may picture the seemingly never-ending line of millions of wildebeest on their great trek, however, the amazingness of the calving season is something that many people may overlook. Calving usually takes place between January and February of each year. In January the herds begin making their way to the south of the Serengeti after the rains start falling. The question of how the herds know when it is raining or not is something many people have questioned and the answer is that we actually do not know! Many people say that they can smell the rain, others believe they can sense when the pressure in the air changes. The only thing we know for sure is that where it rains, the herds follow. Within a two to three week time period, over half a million wildebeest are born with as many as 8 000 wildebeest being born on the same day! ‘’Calving Season is a time where kills are plenty due to the large number of vulnerable calves’’ The herds spend the majority of these three months in the Ndutu and Ngorongoro Conservation areas, although not within the crater itself. Many years ago, volcanoes in the area would erupt and the volcanic ashes that are left behind have led to the soil being rich in nutrients meaning that the grass that grows here is perfect for young wildebeest to munch on and build up their strength in the first few weeks of their lives. The zebra and gazelle that join the thousands of wildebeest on their journey eat the grass shoots that are less appetising to the baby wildebeest, leaving behind only the most nutrient-rich grass shoots that are freshly sprouted and soft enough for young wildebeest mouths to pull from the earth. These grasses are also said to help aid the wildebeest mothers in lactating and making sure their milk is full of the goodness needed to raise strong and healthy babies. ‘’It’s not only wildebeest that migrate – zebra are also part of this annual migration’’ With the promise of rains in the near future between February to May, the young wildebeest are almost always guaranteed fresh and constant grass all the way up into the central parts of the Serengeti. It should come as no surprise that, with all of these baby zebra, gazelle and wildebeest stumbling around on their wobbly legs, the number of predators in the area reaches an all time high during this time of the year. However, an easy meal is no guarantee! These mothers have been following this route for thousands of years and know most of the tricks that predators pull. Wildebeest mothers instinctively know to give birth on the shorter grass plains where approaching predators are easier to spot. Other mothers join them here and actually form protective barricades around the younger and most vulnerable new additions to the herd in order to ensure they have the greatest chance of survival. ‘’The thrill of the chase – an incredible scene to behold’’ Predators also have to deal with extremely over-protective mothers who will do everything in their power to protect their young so if you are travelling to the Serengeti during this time you are guaranteed to see some action unfolding between mothers, their calves and the hungry predators prowling the surrounding areas. It is not only the older, more-experienced predators you will have the chance to see though, they too have co-ordinated their birthing times to coincide with the birth of their prey so that their young have the highest chance of survival too. With thousands of baby wildebeest running around it is much easier for a mother lion, cheetah or leopard to find a meal for their hungry cubs as well as give them the opportunity to learn how to hunt for themselves by practising on young calves before they have to go out and fend for themselves, young cubs learn valuable lessons during this time which is crucial to their success. ‘’Young predators rely on the large number of wildebeest calves in order to have enough food’’ All of these factors go to show that the timing and location of the calving season was purposefully selected in order to increase the chances of survival, both for prey and predator alike. The calving season is truly a remarkable time in East Africa and has so much to offer any safari-goer looking to see something other than the usual river crossing. ‘’The cycle of the annual Wildebeest Migration comes full circle’’ We have three mobile migration camps that move throughout the year to ensure they are located in the best possible position to witness the Great Migration. BEYOND THE SERENGETI GREAT MIGRATION Although most travellers can’t wait to catch a glimpse of the wildebeest’s spectacular trek, Serengeti National Park has much more to offer. Golden-maned lions sunbathing on a rock, an elusive leopard chilling out on a branch of an acacia tree and a cheetah chasing a gazelle at full speed on the never-ending sunburnt plains - to name just a few of the Serengeti’s magical beasts. Stay here for the ultimate Serengeti experience Unique spectacles such as the Great Trek can attract quite a lot of spectators, and you might experience the heart of the migration to be a bit crowded – with human species that is, therefore it is worth considering staying in two different parts of the park. One set in the heart of the migration and one located in a more quiet and remote area where you will be able to truly experience “the wild” in one of Africa’s most wonderful places. These parts are also teeming with wildlife as most predators and many other species are strongly territorial and do not stray from their core territory. Seasonal Serengeti Most travellers pick the dry season (which takes place from late June to October) for a safari in the Serengeti National Park. Animals gather around rivers and waterholes to quench their thirst. The Great Migration is at its absolute prime and your chances of witnessing an iconic river crossing are at their best. Most lodges will remain open during the more tranquil ‘wet season’ when the rains turn the dry landscape into a lush, green oasis and the birthing season begins. Here are some pros and cons for the wet and dry season. SERENGETI NATIONAL PARK PARTS (MIGRATION SAFARI) NORTHERN SERENGETI WILDEBEEST MIGRATION BY THE MARA RIVER From the Lamai Wedge Triangle, at the extreme northern end of the Serengeti National Park, privileged observers can overlook the climax of the mass migration whilst they enjoy the newly conceded comforts of safari travel in Africa, eco-luxury tourism, away from the eager crowds of onlookers clustered on the Masai Mara National Reserve expanse of the Kenyan border of the Serengeti-Masai Mara ecosystem. From July, August to September, the Mara River in northern Serengeti affords the most dramatic river crossings. Fierce and deep, cliff-sided and rain-swollen, the river takes an enormous toll of the exhausted and terrified wild cattle that surge through its torrential flow, some drowning helplessly, foundering in narrow defiles, floundering in mud, falling victim to crocodile, staggering, exhausted to dry land and often, in confusion, returning to the same scene of their ordeal allowing the cycle to repeat itself (read more on accommodations available in Northern Serengeti). On a Serengeti North Mara River Safari with AfricanMecca, this raw, moving farce-cum-tragedy cannot fail to rivet itself in memory as the theatre of Africa; the ungainly animals demonstrate their strength and courage, each an expendable unit of a single wildebeest herd entity determined to survive. Within a landscape defined by starkly rising hills of the western escarpment beyond the golden plains, the struggle continues as the slightly depleted migration herd staggers onward, still trailed by hundreds of hopeful predators. In this untouched wilderness, there are year-round delights; memorable concentrations of big game, portly hippopotamus and grinning crocodile. It is the season of cheetahs, leopards and lionesses with their young cubs. Numerous small mammals hide in the riverine woodlands. Climbing hyrax, mongoose and nocturnal bushbabies inhabit the fig trees. The Wedge Triangle is also a wonderland of avian treasures to be seen during your birding tour of Tanzania. Vultures and eagles soar above the escarpment, red-headed weaver birds hang their nests from acacia branches on the veld and technicolor gems of lovebirds and rollers flash in blinding sunlight between showers. EASTERN SERENGETI WILDEBEEST MIGRATION Enjoy a Serengeti East Safari during October and November when the mega herds return from Masai Mara National Reserve to the rich plains of the Serengeti National Park, east of the Grumeti River, passing through Lobo and Western Loliondo and under the majestic Gol mountains, at the northern edge of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. Here, you will find one of the utmost concentrations of cheetahs in the Serengeti, preying on half a million indigenous gazelles and impalas including migrants. The mountains shelter colonies of Ruppell's Griffon Vultures. Wildebeest cover the central-east valleys on their way north after the long rains, and some pour through the scenic bottleneck of the Angata Kiti pastures during the shorter rains on their way back south. But with or without the migratory millions, this area is breathtaking for its immensity and feeling of freedom. These lands, the way Africa used to be, are home to the nomadic Maasai people, a fitting destination for a Tanzania cultural safari. Lobo, at the eastern edge of the Serengeti National Park and on a small stretch of the Grumeti River that offers excellent year-round game observation, gives unrivaled views of grassland and kopjes. Farther south, outside the game park border, and almost a third as large as the Serengeti National Park, Loliondo is a private concession and more versatile. You may walk and drive without restriction, day and night, on road and off, taking packed meals or dining out in any location you choose. This is truly freedom. You can lose yourself in appreciation of the way of life led by primitive sapiens, with all the visceral satisfactions this entails (read more on accommodations available in Eastern Serengeti). Links with the native Maasai community enable you to experience and appreciate a distinct way of life. Your tribal and wildlife tour of Eastern Africa will liberate you by the discoveries you make about who you truly are. SOUTHERN SERENGETI WILDEBEEST MIGRATION On a Serengeti South Safari with, from December to March, you can follow the wildebeest in at Kusini, in the Serengeti National Park, at Ndutu in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area and on the Maswa Game Reserve. Kusini is spotted with kopjes where cheetahs, leopards and lions abound. The Serengeti cheetah project is based here (read more on accommodations available in Southern Serengeti). Mega herds of herbivores gather on the plains to build up their strength as lush grass follows the short rains. When they move on, the area is still rich with wildlife, especially faunas depending on the protective microclimates of kopjes, where water collects in basin-like rocks and predators, including lions and jackals, keep vigil from above to see what prey will come to drink. Bizarre aardvark and pangolin feed from towering termite mounds. African hedgehogs, hares and voles dart around the rocks, whilst gaudy lizards scurry over them. On the rich grasslands from Ndutu to Kusini, the gnus produce 8000 calves a day for a three week era. Predatory leopards, hyenas, cheetahs, jackals and lions eat their fill, but the majority survives. Nearby alkaline lakes of Ndutu and Masek attract colorful flamingos. Acacia woodlands provide homes for hundreds of birds, monkeys and small mammals. Grassland erupts with wildflowers and fascinating insect life. Maswa Game Reserve, south west of the Serengeti National Park also provides dry season pasture. Here and all around southern Serengeti, you will also find buffalos, hartebeests, impalas, gazelles and dozens of other ungulates, from the gentle duikers to the impudent klipspringers and minute dik-diks. You will also see comical warthogs, shrewd baboons and gawky ostriches, iconic images of wildlife holidays in Africa. In the lush haven of the nearby Ngorongoro Crater, genetic strains of non-migrating wildebeests and distinctive lions have evolved over many years. Black rhinoceros reside here, protected by the park rangers. Not far away, the Olduvai Gorge sheltered the prehistoric man. WESTERN SERENGETI WILDEBEEST MIGRATION BY THE GRUMETI RIVER Around end of April, May and June, a vast army of wildebeests along with its partners: zebras, elands and gazelles mill around the Western Corridor of the Serengeti, south of the Grumeti River. Harassed behind by lions, cheetahs, leopards and hyenas and ahead by giant Nile crocodiles, many hundreds perish as some hazard the river crossing while others detour it. But the beauty of the landscape, stretching without end beneath an infinite sky on a Serengeti West Safari, changes something within the watcher, who becomes more aware of the place of humankind within the drama of the animal world (read more on accommodations available in Western Serengeti). There is a sizeable resident wildebeest population which does not migrate, but remains here year-round. When the seasonal Mbalageti River runs dry, the Grumeti River retains pools which attract thousands of mammals. Buffalo and hippopotamus rarely stray far from water. Many rare and beautiful creatures are found in the private Grumeti Reserve. Black and white Colobus monkeys live in the woodlands with rare, fast-running Patas monkeys. Amazing concentrations of other fauna are seen here during your AfricanMecca safari vacation in northern Tanzania. Impala, topi, reedbuck, waterbuck, Coke’s hartebeest, roan antelope, buffalo and elephant are numbered in their hundreds. The Western Corridor covers Fort Ikoma Wildlife Area and Grumeti Reserve as well as part of the western expanse of Serengeti National Park. Outside the park, you can take guided wildlife walks to spot the myriad birds most prized by twitchers. Grey-breasted spur fowl, helmet shrike, rufus-tailed weaver and fischer’s lovebird, amongst hundreds more. On night game-spotting drives in the private wilderness, look for elusive leopards or nocturnal porcupines, aardvarks, honey badgers and bat-eared foxes. These Serengeti tour activities are prohibited in the Kirawira Area, which is within the national park boundary, though you will appreciate the fantastic views across the magnificent landscape during the day dotted with speckled flora and fauna. CENTRAL SERENGETI WILDEBEEST MIGRATION Central Serengeti’s Seronera Valley is a year-round game-viewing with impressive populations of bovids and predators which remain even after the spectacular hordes of blue wildebeests and zebras have gone. There are several species of hyrax, diminutive cousin of the elephants, hares, elephant shrew and other rodents, many of them red-listed as threatened species, hundreds of bright reptiles and amphibians, and birds in an astonishing variety from gigantic puffed up bustards to the jewel-like sun birds. The endless variety of landscape explains the diversity of wildlife to be seen during a Serengeti Central Safari with AfricanMecca. Volcanic in origin, the terrain has weathered over time to form distinctive areas. The low hill ranges contains black clay pans, which support acacia trees and the giraffe that browse on them. Central grasslands teem with varied herbivores including elands, impalas, buffalos, topis, hippos, and also their predators, hyenas, lions, leopards, cheetahs and other small cats (read more on accommodations available in Central Serengeti). Thick woodland is home to several varieties of primates from vervet monkeys, olive baboons to bushbabies. The wild dog, officially declared extinct in 1991, is reported to have been seen in this area. On the plains, elephants are plentiful where matriarch herds are increasing in certain areas. Moru Kopjes loom from the sweeping savannah like ships on a golden-green sea. In addition to their matchless flora, weird candelabra trees and dazzling ephemeral flowers, the fauna include rare black rhino. Round off your exploratory trip in the wilds of Serengeti by climbing and playing the gong rock, and to admire Maasai cave paintings of elephants, shields and abstract patterns. The kopjes also provide a superlative vantage point from which to observe the massed bovids plunging past to their northern and western migratory course in April, May, preoccupied with the urgency of the rut as males select their harems and defend their territories. You can also see them in dissected herds on way south to calve around December and January. -Serengeti Balloon You were able to explore the Serengeti experience and the majestic Serengeti from the sky. -Lake Manyara Tour You got a memorable Safari experience in lake Manyara National Park as we advised you to book your tour through a great tour operator(That’s Burgi Chato Safaris), where you were able to explore areas of the tree-climbing lion, see a large number of elephants, Observe the social baboons, enjoy the out of the Safari car experience and watch pink flamingos soar). - Lake Natron Tour Touring Lake Natron with us made you explore a variety of activities such as walking safaris, flamingo walks, volcano climbing, and cultural tours accompanied by beautiful exposure. -Ol doing lengai Hiking Also, this gave an opportunity to hike Ol Doinyo Lengai mostly known as the “Mountain of God” in the Maasai Language, it is an active volcano located in the Arusha region of Tanzania, Africa, a part of the volcanic system of East Africa Rift it unequally produces natrocarbonatite lava). -Lake Eyasi the Hadzabe Bushmen tour Also, you visited Lake Eyasi and interact with the Datoga and Hadzabe bushmen as the people who still live in Northern Central Tanzania live in harmony with each other and nature). -Shopping (Maasai craft and Tanzanite experience) It was our pleasure to take you to the best place to buy Maasai Traditional clothes known as Maasai Shuka, carvings, and Sovereign Tanzanite. -Mount Meru Hiking (you got time to climb and summit Mount Meru got experience of the fifth highest mountain on the African continent and the second highest in Tanzania that you never forget). -Mount Kilimanjaro Climbing You got the possibility of climbing up the highest and most famous summit in Tanzania, where climbing Kilimanjaro mountain gave and provided all you wanted to get to the mountain). however, climbing mount Kilimanjaro involves the following route to pass through to reach the top of the Kilimanjaro mountain ( At the summit), which are Machame route, Lemosho route, Marangu route, Rongai route, Umbwe route, and Northern circuit), but you choose the best route. - Materuni Waterfall/Coffee Tour We as the best Materuni Waterfall tour operator, we let you explore a place at which you may rest, refresh your mind and achieve your holiday, also you were able to know how to make a traditional coffee with amazing smell) -Marangu Waterfall/Coffee Tour/Cave Touring in Tanzania will not disappoint you ever, Marangu waterfall was also the best attractive area where you experienced stunning landscapes, went swimming, and thereafter got a chance to know the history of Chaga Cave. -Cheka(Kikuletwa)hot spring Tour, We let you experience a lot of Tanzania beauty, and saw the best natural water springs found in the Kilimanjaro region). -Kilimanjaro Bike Tour, (Burigi Chato Safaris as a tour operator made you experience a cycle safari around Moshi, explore the hot springs and waterfalls and the new place). -Moshi City Tour, We made you experience the beauty of Kilimanjaro city, cultural heritage, city tour, Hadzabe tribe, Materuni waterfalls, a coffee tour, and Kikuletwa Hot springs). -Zanzibar Tour You had a possibility to make a visit to the following tour area; -cheetah`s Rock(you explored and saw the way animals are resecured and contribute to the conservation), Nakupenda Beach You got the full experience and book a tour to refresh and explore amazing beauty and all about snorkeling and sunbathing on Zanzibar. Nungwi provision Island changed, Stone town This was one of the great local experiences that always attracts most visitors because of the totally amazing and all the incredible things to do there. space farm, Joan forest, Paje beach if am not mistaken, Paje was your main reason for having toured in Zanzibar because of a big and beautiful white sand beach boarded by a small-by-small village on one side and collection of beachfront accommodation service as well as turquoise waters on the other and the last area is Old dame market. Within the areas mentioned above you encountered various tasks or activities like; stone town walking tour, Zanzibar spice tour, Poison island tour, Mnemba snorkeling tour, dolphin tour, Nakupenda tour, Jambi ani village tour, and Safari blue.
Written 31 January 2021
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
About the operator

This experience only has a few reviews, but you can read what other travellers have to say about the operator.

By: #1 BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS CO LTD - Serengeti Migration | Tanzania Safari | Kilimanjaro Hiking Company.
sophieclov
sophieclov
00
Tanzanai safari tour, the dream.
Tanzania safari the tour i did and spend a lot of cash, it was a tour i did with many companies including burigi ch
AnnaISFRUS
AnnaISFRUS
00
Wonderful
Wonderful and unforgettable trip! From Safari to Kili and then Zanzibar. One in a lifetime experience and journey.
demshyna
demshyna
00
Amaizing Lifetime Experiance
This was a total life changing experience,  booking a great wildebeest migration safari with burigi chato safaris  
uzairparuk
uzairparuk
00
Unforgettable experience
I did a 5 day Serengeti and Ngorongoro tour to see the Migration , it was truly unforgettable! Geofrey the company
rodrickd983
rodrickd983
00
The great tour in Tanzania
I had an amazing experience that was organized very well by my tour operator, the meal and accommodation was excell
Freedom606425
Freedom606425
00
100% Recommend Burigi Chato Safaris
If you are in Tanzania, you must use this company for your Safari experience. Overall they were very experienced an
zaburons
zaburons
00
Amazing day tour in Lake Chala
Thank you, Burigi Chato Safari, for making our tour wonderful in Lake Chala, we got a chance to swim and to take a
zaburons
zaburons
00
Fantastic Kilimanjaro airport pickup
Was a great transfer from Kilimanjaro Airport, our car was very nice with air-condition and our driver from our tou
Relax757898
Relax757898
00
Incredible experience
I selected Follow Alice for my Tanzania adventure based on the stellar reviews they've received - I am thrilled to
Angelika K
Angelika K
00
The best Africa has to offer on only 260 square kilometers
The Ngorongoro crater was truly a highlight of our Tanzania safari. We even saw two black rhinos, lots of lions, bu
FarkhondehZ
FarkhondehZ
00
Tanzania best destination
It was my first trip to African continent 16 years ago and it is still the best memory that I have, even though I t
Andyfharose
Andyfharose
00
Not only just animals, landscape matter.
Serengeti was the best experience that I ever had. For me, not only we can see wild animals, but also the lanscape
elijahpopov
elijahpopov
00
Prison island
One of the best trip in Zanzibar is Prison Island. It's really interesting where are so many monuments and places w
erika7912
erika7912
00
Amazing island
Great island to discover all the tastes, colours and music of Africa and to see amazing wildlife, flora and fauna.
DayanaGeorgieva94
DayanaGeorgieva94
00
Journey in Zanzibar
Incredible journey. Blue Safari with snorkeling , visiting Stone town , meeting with giant turtles in Prison island
Frequently Asked Questions about 3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD

3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD will start at 8:00 AM. Discover and book 3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD on Tripadvisor

3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD price starts from £676.39. Discover and book 3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD on Tripadvisor

3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD cancellation policy: For a full refund, cancel at least 24 hours in advance of the start date of the experience. Discover and book 3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD on Tripadvisor

3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD is hosted by #1 BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS CO LTD - Serengeti Migration | Tanzania Safari | Kilimanjaro Hiking Company.. Read reviews, discover additonal experiences or contact #1 BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS CO LTD - Serengeti Migration | Tanzania Safari | Kilimanjaro Hiking Company. on Tripadvisor. Discover and book 3 Days Tanzania big 5 Safari - Serengeti & Ngorongoro | BURIGI CHATO SAFARIS LTD on Tripadvisor