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Yokesone, Sale, Myanmar
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Yokesone Monastery Tours and Tickets
from US$42.50
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from US$47.00
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Reviewed 14 February 2019 via mobile

This beautiful teak monastery was built almost 200 years ago and is in “mint condition”. It gives you an idea how the older monasteries looked like in their hay day. It was funded by a local powerful merchant. It’s decorated with a lot of intricate...More

Date of experience: February 2019
Thank Teddy-at-large
Reviewed 1 December 2018

Located in the small town of Salay on the Irrawaddy River, this place is a monastery built with teak wood, now well blackened with age. It is full of, and decorated on the outside by, a large range of wooden sculptures. These are a joy...More

Date of experience: November 2018
Thank Andy F
Reviewed 31 March 2018 via mobile

It's a bit off the beaten track but well worth a visit to this Monastery. The building and carvings are in good condition and ornate. The artifacts inside are also fascinating.

Date of experience: March 2018
Thank AP194R
Reviewed 17 March 2018

the monastery is made out of teak, and has very ornate carvings. Some of monastery is a bit run-down, but generally it is in good condition.

Date of experience: January 2018
Thank MarkRosa
Reviewed 16 February 2018

This monastery is off the beaten track but well worth a visit as it is made of teak and was worth the 5 hr round trip from Bagan ( we visited loads of places on the day trip)

Date of experience: February 2018
Thank Ross B
Reviewed 22 January 2018 via mobile

Far from the crowds... This tranquil place is worth the detour.... Some wonderful treasures inside... Beautifully maintained.... Go in for lunch to Salay House in the middle of the village.... Well run and beautiful situation...

Date of experience: January 2018
Thank 311austinl
Reviewed 20 January 2018

A short walk from the Irrawaddy River bank through the fascinating village of Salay, the monastery is amazing in that it is made completely from teak. While we were there they were coating some of the wood with an evil oil concoction which was dripping...More

Date of experience: January 2018
1  Thank wendyanddavid536
Reviewed 5 January 2018

If you have had enough of the brick temples of Bagan, one option is to take a car 2.5 hours south to a town called Salay. This small town has some fantastic monasteries, as well as 109 Bagan-period temples if you are still in the...More

Date of experience: December 2017
Thank 2012Excavator
Reviewed 27 December 2017 via mobile

One of the must see stops on any tour down the Irawady, the monastery/ Museum is a well restored ornately carved wooden monastery building. Set in a shady quiet compound it’s an island of calm amid the usual dust, bustle, smells and noise of a...More

Date of experience: December 2017
Thank TheSciolist
Reviewed 24 December 2017 via mobile

We really enjoyed our visit here as a break from all the palace and stupas found in Bagan. Inside Are some very old museum piece dating back to the 13th century. Cost is 5000, shame there was no English brochures. Don't miss going further down...More

Date of experience: December 2017
Thank tezza915
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