Pont Bonaparte
Pont Bonaparte
3.5
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Monday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Tuesday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Wednesday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Thursday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Friday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Saturday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Sunday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
About
Duration: < 1 hour
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Top ways to experience Pont Bonaparte and nearby attractions

The area
Neighbourhood: Vieux Lyon - Quarantaine
How to get there
  • Vieux Lyon - Cathédrale St.Jean • 3 min walk
  • Bellecour • 5 min walk
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3.5
3.5 of 5 bubbles23 reviews
Excellent
1
Very good
12
Average
9
Poor
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Terrible
0

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CPaM68
Texas686 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2020
If you are heading into Vieux Lyon from Place Bellecour (the city’s main square), you will cross over the Saône River on the Pont Bonaparte bridge. The first bridge was built here in 1630 to specifically allow King Louis XIII, who was visiting Leon, to go from the Église Saint-Georges Cathedral to the hotel where he was staying. The bridge has been destroyed several times by floods and in September 1944, the German forces dynamited the bridge as they retreated from the Allies. It was then replaced by the current bridge, built between 1946 and 1950. The current bridge has three arches covered with stone from the quarries of Hauteville; the same quarries which supplied the stone for the Empire State Building in New York City. The bridge was given its current name in January 1964.
Written 6 September 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dimitris L
Sydney, Australia49,991 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2019
We did not find Pont Bonaparte particularly exciting. It is just a normal bridge allowing traffic through over the river. It offers some nice views over the water.
Written 8 August 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alexander W
Bishops Stortford, UK1,112 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2024 • Family
Useful bridge to take you from Vieux Lyon to Place Bellecour.
There’s also a nice view of the Passerelle du Palais de Justice, which is probably best viewed from a distance.
Written 18 February 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alien W
834 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2023 • Family
The bridge is normal. There are many bridges over the river. This one is not sepcial. But it is near the cathedral.
Written 5 September 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Regislive
Buffalo, NY525 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2019
If you have time walk across the Pont Bonaparte you will get great views of the old city! It is a nice safe bridge to cross.
Written 2 November 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

investigator64
Ivanovo, Russia42,651 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2024 • Family
How many bridges do you think there are in Lyon? I'll give you a hint: the city is located at the meeting place of two fairly deep rivers - the Rhone and the Saone. It seems that it would be logical to multiply the number of bridges that is reasonable for a large NON-MARINE city by two - and here is the result! But in Lyon, not everything can always be reasoned with: travel lovers probably know that the largest number of bridges is in Hamburg - there are 2,376 of them...
But in the exclusively land-based Lyon there are as many (or just?) 35 of them. Of these, 17 are on the Rhone and 18 are on the Saone. It should be said right away that you won’t see any super beautiful bridge interesting things in the city (at least I didn’t find any). And the whole point is that in their current guise, Lyon bridges were built or restored in the second half of the 19th - mid-20th centuries. And the beauty of these buildings in those days was by no means at the forefront. Although, it should be recognized that the history of individual bridges in Lyon goes back hundreds of years.
For example, the Bonaparte Bridge (Pont Bonaparte), which will be the “hero” of my post today. It is less than 10 minutes from the city's main square, Place Bellecour. If you look from the outside - slightly squat, devoid of decorative elements customary for buildings of this type, it is a kind of “bridge allusion” to the great French emperor: short, strong, stingily solid, devoid of a craving for “tinsel and glitter.” But let's return to the history of the bridge.
The first wooden crossing over the Saone at this very place was built back in 1546 to connect the Saint-Jean quarter in Old Lyon - the medieval part of the city between Fourvière hill and the Saone - with the left bank of the river. In 1634-1642, according to the design of engineer Jean Christophe Marie and at his own expense, the old bridge was rebuilt. As for the creator of the crossing: this is the same little-known engineer whose name the bridge in Paris bears - it was he who built the crossing that connected the island of Saint-Louis with the continental part of the city, which served as an impetus for further urbanization of the island.
As for the Lyon bridge built by Monsieur Mari, it was originally called differently: Archiepiscopal, Wooden, Circular, Belcourt Bridge of the Canons (I didn’t understand why the latter). But this, as I understand it, was a very profitable business project of the creator - engineer Marie: passage across it was paid, about three dozen shops were opened on it - in a fairly lively and accessible place, the bridge itself was locked at night and surrendered under protection. Alas, due to frequent floods and turbulent river flows, by 1669 the bridge had fallen into disrepair and had to be rebuilt.
By the way, the toll across the bridge was abolished in 1661 in honor of the birth of the first son of the Dauphin Louis XIV and Maria Theresa of Austria - Louis the Great Dauphin, and the shops were closed at the end of the 17th century (instead, small benches were installed for the rest of loitering people). And in February 1711, for some reason the Saone got so angry that it simply demolished the bridge. And only in 1732 it was restored. But after half a century it was once again destroyed by the elements.
Almost immediately, work began on the construction of a new, now stone structure, which lasted until 1807. According to the data I found in a few sources, the bridge was built under the leadership of a certain engineer Carron. If anyone remembers history, they will certainly compare the year of construction of the new Lyon road structure with the year of the signing of the Tilsit Peace Treaty between France and Russia by Russian Emperor Alexander I and Napoleon I Bonaparte.
It was in honor of this very beneficial event for the French that the newly built five-arch 148-meter bridge was named Tilsit (Pont de Tilsit). But its design was not perfect (due to the low location of the flights during flood periods, problems arose), so in 1864 the bridge was rebuilt while maintaining its “name”. Alas, exactly eight decades later, in September 1944, the Tilsit Bridge was blown up by retreating Wehrmacht troops. In 1946-1950 it was restored, and the number of arches was reduced to three. I don’t know for what reason, but on January 27, 1964, this road structure was renamed and received its current name - the Bonaparte Bridge.
What this renaming is connected with - I could not find out. I’ll be honest: Pont Bonaparte in Lyon is not the most interesting bridge in my travel experience, but it might be of interest to bridge lovers.
Google
Written 3 June 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Talant2007
Moscow, Russia24,368 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Solo
The Pont Bonaparte in Lyon is a bridge over the Saone River. The first wooden bridge was built in 1634 - 1642. Afterwards it was rebuilt many times due to destruction. The current bridge was built in 1946 - 1950.
Google
Written 6 October 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Martin B
Rosario, Argentina1,820 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2023 • Friends
A passage bridge between the peninsula and the Old City. Area that you should walk when visiting Lyon and that crosses the Saône River. It is a bridge from which you can photograph the river and know that it was destroyed by the Germans once and rebuilt many times due to floods. Cement/stone arches in a simple structure. A good photo of Lyon, from the bridge and towards it. Pay attention that you are going to arrive in passing.
Google
Written 30 March 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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PONT BONAPARTE (2024) All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

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