Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial

Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial

Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial
4.5
9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Monday
9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
About
Jean-Dolidier-Weg 75 21039 Hamburg Germany Tel.: +49 40 - 4 28 13 15 00 Fax: +49 40 - 4 28 13 15 01 E-mail: info@kz-gedenkstaette-neuengamme.de
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles224 reviews
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15
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3
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1

Ernie H
Cardiff, UK2,197 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2023 • Couples
Started at the Remembrance block and walked through the rest of the site (approx. 1km long) and saw everything in a long day. Take food and drink with you we would suggest. The bus service is very good to and from the camp from Bergdorf. Due to the camp having had many roles since the end of the war it is mostly well preserved for hard structures. The timber buildings are long gone but their locations are denoted by gabions full of rubble with information boards (google translate is useful). Staff we talked to were great and took time to explain many things including the Cap Arcona sinking in May 1945 with a huge loss of life to evacuated prisoners.

The brickwork buildings are huge and the ordeal of the forced labourers unimaginable. Labour was also provided to other organisations and there were around 85 sub camps to facilitate this, including one next to our Hotel in Hammerbrooke and at Bullenhuser Damm.
Written 14 November 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

gordon b
Galway, Ireland37 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2023 • Friends
A harrowing experience but a fantastic look back at history. Easy enough to get to by public transport from Hamburg.
We only visited for 2 hours and only saw a fraction of the camp.
There is a cafe for tea and cakes with friendly staff if you need a break.
Written 7 December 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LightHausKeeper
North West8 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2017 • Solo
I started at Hamburg Hauptbahnhof and from platform 11, I got the 9.21am train to Buchen. It was one stop (10 minutes) to Bergedorf station. Single way cost 3.20 euros.

From Bergedorf station, go upstairs and there is a connected bus station. I had just missed the bus 227 so I went to the bus help desk who told me the next bus was the 327 at platform H at 10.22am. I waited around but there are shops and eateries in the station. The lady said I could USE my train ticket to pay for the bus. The journey took about 25 minutes. You will know you have arrived because you go through a lot of green fields then suddenly long red brick buildings will appear. The admission was free but I chose to get audio set 2 euros with 10 euros deposit. The audio set was like a mobile or cell phone.

I was there for nearly three hours. I found the whole experience astonishing and upsetting. But it was important to visit here so we can learn about our past to avoid such atrocities again. You will have your own experience of the Camp.

On the way back to Bergedorf station, use the same bus stop on the same side of the Camp. The bus will do a loop. Use the same number buses 227 and 327. There is one bus every 30 minutes. 15 minutes past the hour or 15 minutes for the hour.

If you find this helpful please click the 'like' button below. Thank you for your time and have a safe trip.
Written 1 May 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

JDouglsGuy
Haverhill, MA72 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2013 • Family
I spent my senior year as an exchange student at the University of Hamburg 40 years ago, and at that point no one had heard of or acknowledged the Nazi work camp in Neuengamme, just a short ride outside of Hamburg in Vierlanden, the regional flower growing district. Local officials just wanted to ignore and preferably forget its terrible history. Instead of knocking it down, they just built a new prison next to it. It took years of outraged protest to get government to tear down the jail and simply leave the work camp, or what is left of it, as a memorial to the thousands of prisoners forced to work in the heat of summer or the cold of winter at this brick making factory. Since Hamburg was slated to be one of Hitler's exemplary Reichsstädte, a new architectural jewel in gleaming red brick, those bricks had to be made somewhere, and it was Neuengamme. Those bricks had to be transported to the city, so the plan was to dig a canal from the grounds to the nearby Elbe River, not with machinery, but with human labor, one shovel full at a time. Prisoners were forced to work in the cold of winter with nothing more than standard camp shirt and pants; if a worker dropped dead from exposure, there was always another. Neuengamme was not a Nazi death camp, rather it worked its prisoners ruthlessly and sometimes to death. Now the grounds are spacious and easy to walk through. The garage is exactly as it was left. There are no prisoner residence halls left, only the home of the camp commander, but the on-site museum has great artifacts and well-done displays, plus many stories of individual prisoners. The memorial site to the victims of the camp is very moving. Visitors can and should book a tour with an English speaking guide--just call ahead a few days because there are none on premises.
Written 28 March 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

msmartwanderer
Pune, India40 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2013 • Solo
I always wanted to visit a camp...Coming to Europe from India, most of others found it weird...I grabbed opportunity while in Hamburg and visited this place first train and hen bus. Bus driver was not supportive when I indicated I am here to visit camp and dropped me off atleast 2 stops ahead. Not knowing the directions and ofcourse German I actually started walking in opposite direction. There was a small patch of houses and I knocked on one..An elderly woman came out, she didnt understand English and I couldnt understand German, but she was so kind she managed to tell me using sign languages and a small pat on my back.. Such a heartening gesture that was.. I hugged her and walked @ 2 miles to reach entrance of the camp. .hardly did I know it was the day I would walk longest..what Is aw there was heart breaking, hurting, i felt the pain..i heard the cries ..i kept walking that huge area... and I wept... sitting on ground I wept....but amazing thing happened next..as I went thru the well-preserved and managed museum, I was astonished by the optimistic, scientific, curious, artistic intelligence of the inmates displayed thru there creations, made out of NOTHING, may be a small piece of thin cloth or a wire or a match stick........and I felt so wonderful for the gift of free life that I have.. I am so grateful to those departed souls who made me realise the asset I had and taken for granted..one of the most important days of my life....Amen
Written 25 March 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Robert P
Chesterfield, VA1,355 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2016 • Friends
The Neuengamme concentration camp was a German concentration camp, established in 1938 by the SS near the village of Neuengamme in the Bergedorf district of Hamburg, Germany. The Nazi operated the camp from 1938 to 1945. During that period, it interred an estimated 106,000 prisoners at the main camp and its approximately 87 sub camps. More than half of them perished there. After Germany's defeat in 1945, the British Army used the site as an internment camp until 1948. In 1948, the British transferred the facility to the Hamburg prison authority, which tore down the camp huts and built a new prison cellblock. After being operated as two prisons by the Hamburg authorities from 1950 to 2004 the site now serves as a memorial.

The memorial site is located in the grounds of the largest former Nazi concentration camp in north-west Germany. The Nazi SS forced prisoners to make bricks, armaments and to create canals to and from the Elbe River. My daughter and I spent about four hours visiting the site at our own pace. She reads and speaks German so we did not take the guided tour. You may obtain an audio guide for €2 plus €10 deposit at the reception desk that explains the uses for the various buildings.

The city has gone to great lengths to restore much of the site to its original footprint. Fifteen historic concentration camp buildings have been preserved. The grounds are well maintained and we had a map of the camp. The serene calm of the camp belies the terrible suffering and death that occurred there. It is ironic that the Nazis documented everything. It is through these meticulous records that the life and fate of thousands of prisoners are on record there. Physical exhibits include inmate beds, eating utensils, clothing, and, filing cabinets with records on individuals, and more. The Hall of Remembrance is particularly haunting with its scrolls of names of prisoners who died by date. Much of the information is in English.

Most of the camp is accessible to visitors in wheelchairs, walkers, and those who need assistance walking. Neuengamme is open daily from 9:30 am to 4:00 pm and Saturday and Sunday from 12:00 pm to 7:00 pm from April through September. From October through March, it is open from 12:00 pm to 5:00 pm. Admission is free and the area is accessible outside the operational hours. Photography is permitted.

If you are in Hamburg, I urge you to take some time to visit this camp. It provides lessons that should never be forgotten.
Written 1 October 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Elliot S
Oceanside, NY111 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2018 • Couples
This is a must see. Man’s inhumanity to man is on full display here, at its worst. A compelling, upsetting, horrifying look at the Nazi atrocities of World War 2. This should never happen again but, unfortunately, it does happen over and over, every day of the week in different parts of the world. We were on a cruise and hired a taxi to take us there and pick us up at the end of our visit. It takes about 35 - 45 minutes each way and costs about 55 Euros. No need to hire a guide, for 2 Euros (cash only) get an audio player in English. All exhibits are in various languages, including English. Admission is free. Give yourself at least 2 hours. You can easily stay for 3 or more hours. I was overwhelmed by the brutality that happened there.
Written 5 October 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Frederico B
Hürth, Germany126 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2014 • Family
If you have been in other Camps, this is not very special.
If you have never been in one and o you are in Hamburg, you can try a visit.
There is one exposition, some rests of buildings and a memorial.
One can combine a visit to the Bergedorf Castle as well.
Written 18 May 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

clohanes
Dublin, Ireland205 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2012 • Friends
Vitited this memorial in late febuary 2012 .the day was cold and wet .we got a train from Hamburg ,and a taxi to this memorial .I have been to six other Concentration Camps sites before i visited Neuengamme.We were the only visitors there that morning .All the barrack are gone but the foundations of the buildings have been restored and filled with rubble.There is still a lot of this camp still standing eg red brick buildings.It covers a large area and you would have to allow at least three hours to get around this camp. I have visited a few camps before this and found this camp mild compare to Auschwitz..There was no guide or information centre when we visited or else we missed it so you need to do your homework before you visit.Inside the buildings there is a good exhibition which you could miss.We got a bus back to the train station from outsite the main entrance.well worth a visit if you are in hamburg.
Written 16 June 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ana L
Navan, Ireland2,684 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2017 • Couples
I have visited several concentration camps before, and I was not disappointed with the available information on this one. Of course it is smaller than Auschwitz, but there are still quite some buildings with information, and collected items. Interesting (and dark) story about this place. If you have time, consider this visit. Train+bus (45 min), every 30 min, at least.
Allow yourself around 3h, at least, if you are interested in details. Plenty to read and walk!
Written 12 January 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Neuengamme Concentration Camp Memorial, Hamburg

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