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Titus Thermen

57 Reviews
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Titus Thermen

57 Reviews
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Walter-Moeller-Platz 2 im Nordwestzentrum, 60439 Frankfurt, Hesse Germany
Getting there
Heddernheimer LandstraßeFrankfurt U-Bahn8 min
WiesenauFrankfurt U-Bahn13 min
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Discover Frankfurt and its region with a local pilot
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Discover Frankfurt and its region with a local pilot

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See a perspective on Frankfurt that few other visitors experience—and enjoy a memorable way to explore the city—on a private flight. Pick between multiple convenient flight times, make your own way to the airport, and meet your pilot. Then take the skies: you’ll soar over the city’s major landmarks, will spot highlights like the Main River and Frankenstein Castle, and will learn more from your pilot’s commentary.
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Phillip T wrote a review Nov 2019
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania8 contributions6 helpful votes
Located in a northern suburb of Frankfurt, Titus Thermen is a four-level facility with an indoor water park and three-level sauna with faux-Roman decor, plus an exercise area; the concept is similar to a "super sento" in Japan, but despite the "thermen" name, is *not* a hot mineral spring. I was lucky enough to find a staffer fluent in English, and offered to summarize the protocol to reduce anxiety among curious foreign guests. Access: A few meters outside the north upper-level exit of the NordWestZentrum shopping mall (nwz-frankfurt.de), at the NordWestZentrum stop on Frankfurt's U-1 rail line, which is the 13th stop (about 20 minutes) north of the Hauptwache interchange. The mall has maps. Price and hours: Adult weekday two-hour admission is 5.50 EUR (swim only) or 12.00 EUR (swim and sauna); 20% discount with the Frankfurt Card (frankfurt-tourismus.de). Open daily from 9:00/10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., last entry one hour before closing. What to bring: Body wash, towel, pool shoes ("badeshuhen"), bathing suit. If necessary you can buy a suit and pool shoes, and you can rent a towel. Amenities: The pool section (clothed) has lockers, separate M/F restrooms ("WC"), and separate M/F gang showers. The deck has loungers; three jacuzzis; a lap-pool with lanes (reserved) and diving board; a pair of connected fun-pools with rock-grottoes, lazy river, and slide (50 meters, nine seconds); and a children's miniature splash-park. The sauna section (co-ed and nude, "textilfrei") has three floors, connected by a spiral staircase. The first has separate M/F locker rooms (with hot-air body dryers), a help-desk, snack-bar, massage rooms, and three saunas that are reserved for women on Monday and Wednesday; the second has gang showers and a cold pool (frigidarium, if following the Roman model); the third has an outdoor wooden deck and a large sauna (capacity ~30). Scattered across the upper two floors are rooms at various temperatures (dry saunas, steam sauna/hamam), individual showers for cooling down, foot baths, supplies of ice, fabric loungers, and S-shaped heated tiled loungers. All of the wet areas have shelves for eyeglasses. Procedure: At the front desk you're given a card which you use to enter the facility, and then slot inside your locker to enable its lock. (Return to the front desk upon exit.) You also get a waterproof wristband with a key (for the locker) and an RFID transponder (for the gateways between the pool and sauna sections). Towel rental is 3.50 EUR plus 15 EUR deposit. To rent, ask at the front desk or the help-desk inside the sauna. You're given a receipt that is stamped twice, upon receipt and return of the towel; upon exit show at the front desk for the refund. Wash thoroughly before using any of the facilities (preferably with soap). Under German practice, in a dry sauna you leave your pool shoes outside, and sit on a towel to avoid getting the wood wet. The large sauna is staffed by a saunameister, who performs hourly infusions ("aufguss"); he pours an essential oil on the stove, then wafts the scented smoke at the guests with an oversized folding fan. During my visit (a weekday evening) most of the sauna guests were male. To move between floors most wrapped themselves with a towel, but strolling nude across the three floors is perfectly acceptable. The staff are always fully clad in uniforms. Titus Thermen is one of 14 swimming and leisure facilities operated by BäderBetriebe Frankfurt GmbH; they're co-promoted on the frankfurter-baeder.de site and have similar features.
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Date of experience: October 2019
1 Helpful vote
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Jocelyn C wrote a review Apr 2019
New York8 contributions11 helpful votes
I am a big fan of the European thermal spas, eg Carolus Thermen in Aachen, Claudius Therme in Cologne, Aquadome in Austria to name a few. And when I saw the name "Titus Thermen" I assumed because of the word thermen it would be at least close to that, a nice European style spa. The pictures on the website also looked pretty nice, I read it has 3 floors of saunas so I said "sold!" The first sign that something was amiss was when I got to the location, and saw that it's a therme in a MALL. Uh oh. This does not bode well. I get to the counter, and the lady does not speak a WORD of english. Now which self respecting spa, in GERMANY of all places (where people speak such great english) would have a non english speaker at the front desk if it is used to having people from around the world coming in? I realized then that this must be more of a local joint than a destination spa visitors would want to come to. I enter the "spa" and go to the first level of saunas. There are these LOUD ass women (not German, sounded more like Russian) talking at the top of their voices, INSIDE a sauna, even when I was in there. Like just talking over me as though they owned the whole room. I know the spa cannot control this, but I mention this just to give you an idea of the caliber of people that come to this spa, who don't even know or respect spa etiquette. But then, is this really more of a public bath that you have to pay a bit of money for? The changing rooms also have no hair dryer, yet another point for categorizing this as a public bath rather than a thermal spa. But thankfully it wasn't all bad. The rest of the place is OKAY. There is a small hot tub on the roofdeck that is quite nice, and there were a couple of saunas that infused some nice smells so that was very pleasant. Overall however, the feel and atmosphere was that of a public bath with some saunas and two hot tubs. Definitely definitely not the European thermal spas I have come to love. And maybe I am misunderstanding the word therme, but this review is for ANY person out there like me who sees therme and thinks nice european thermal spa/bath because this is definitely NOT that!!!!!
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Date of experience: April 2019
2 Helpful votes
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Stephen V wrote a review Nov 2018
Swords, Ireland90 contributions27 helpful votes
Very good clean pool with good facilities, Girls enjoyed the lazy river, slide and jacuzzi. Very clean changing rooms with family areas. When you book a time slot, be aware that this includes shower and dressing time. If you go over, you will be charged an extra fee,
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Date of experience: November 2018
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KnewGuessed wrote a review Mar 2018
Toronto, Canada118 contributions62 helpful votes
This was my first time at a German sauna, though I've been going to saunas for a long time I was curious to see how the German experience differs. First of all, you pay at the front depending on how long you want to stay. It was a bit expensive at around €25 for four hours, which I found to be quite a reasonable time. Make sure you have flip flops or you'll have to buy them at the desk. You'll also need a towel. Note that they wouldn't accept a foreign credit card so it's useful to have cash. You're given a plastic card and then enter the facility by tapping it against a reader, and then enter the change rooms (separate by sex). The key thing with the lockers is that you have to place the card in the slot on the inside part of the lock. That allows the door to lock and for you to remove the key, which is attached to a wristband for convenience. The facility includes three floors of maybe a dozen saunas with a large cold bath, several hot tubs and a large rooftop deck which was a nice place to cool off even in the winter. There's also a small restaurant/dining area on the first floor though it didn't look to be too full. When you leave you slide the card into a slot beside the exit (the machine eats the card) and go on your way. The place is accessible by the U-bahn about 20 minutes from downtown Frankfurt. It's located right beside a mall (Nordwestzentrum) which I honestly found quite confusing to navigate, even on a Sunday when all the shops were closed. Now for the experience: there are three big things that stood out to me about the German sauna. #1) Yes it is coed and nude. No one thinks this is an issue and honestly it isn't when you get used to it. The Germans don't have hang ups or complexes about this stuff and think everyone has a body and there is nothing shameful or strange about different body types, which makes sense when you think about it. When I went on a Sunday early afternoon it was probably about 2/3 young people (20s-30s), approximately 50-50 men and women, and seemed to be popular with young couples in particular. The remaining 1/3 was seniors (mostly older men) and even some families with kids (I think that is only on certain days). Generally the custom that pretty much everyone seemed to follow was to wear a towel or robe when relaxing in the lawn chairs and go naked in the sauna, pool, hot tub and showers. Most people wear a towel walking around, though that varied. Definitely no clothes/bathing suits, as it is considered unhygienic. #2) Unlike Scandinavian and Eastern European saunas which are as much or more about socializing, the German sauna is really just about health and relaxation. You won't find too many people having conversations, especially in the sauna itself. So even if you only speak a little bit of German like myself, you don't have to be worried about being pulled into conversations unless you do something wrong. The health rules generally seem to be the following: shower pretty fully before entering and shower frequently; wear your flip flops walking around but leave them at the door before entering a sauna; and most important, don't let your sweat drop onto the benches. That means laying out your towel such that no part of the body touches the wood (whether sitting or lying down). This is a huge deal and everyone follows it very fastidiously. A lot of people had some pretty complex systems worked out with multiple towels at once, or with using one towel for the sauna and others for sitting in the lawn chairs, or with a robe for relaxing outside and a towel for sitting on in the sauna, etc. You will be ok with just one towel but a lot of people seemed to have their own system refined over many visits. #3) The part I was most eager to experience was the Aufguss, which is when the saunameister (who unlike everyone else does wear clothes) pours water on the rocks and fans the heat around the room. The ritual lasts about ten minutes and during that time no one is allowed to enter (leaving is discouraged and I didn't see anyone do it in two sessions, though some people did move down a step or two when it became really hot). And it does get hot. The saunas themselves are in a pretty bearable range (generally 80 to 100 C) but emptying two full buckets of water on the rocks creates quite a hot and humid atmosphere even for someone used to saunas. It is totally worth it though and cooling off on the roof deck, having an ice cold shower or going for a dip in the pool (or all three) is unbelievably refreshing. The Aufguss takes place according to a schedule (it's Germans after all) and these are consequently the most popular times for the sauna rooms. I recommend the third floor sauna which you access from the roof deck, which is quite large and was full (though not uncomfortably so) both times I did the Aufguss there. Overall, I can't compare this to other German saunas but thought it was an enjoyable and relaxing experience and would return. There was also a pool complex which the sauna pass gives you free access to, but I didn't even have time for that (and it looked to be pretty packed with screaming children).
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Date of experience: February 2018
13 Helpful votes
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Eran G wrote a review Jan 2018
107 contributions40 helpful votes
Titus Thermen is a nice place. They have few saunas bath in different temperature. The entry fees are very expensive. The entrance to the saunas is oblige to be nude. They enforce you to have a sandals in the saunas ( if you don’t have - you can buy there). The most interesting place there is the shopping center next to the Thermen.
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Date of experience: December 2017
1 Helpful vote
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