Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia

Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia

Museo Nazionale Etrusco di Villa Giulia
4.5
Speciality MuseumsArt MuseumsHistory Museums
9:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 8:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 8:00 PM
About
A beautiful 16th century palace housing a world-famous collection of ancient Etruscan sculpture and artifacts. Exbitions room closes at 8.00 p.m.
Duration: 1-2 hours
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Admission tickets
from £19.33
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  • Flaminio - Piazza del Popolo • 8 min walk
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles763 reviews
Excellent
524
Very good
181
Average
39
Poor
15
Terrible
4

ChiccoTorino
Turin, Italy159 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2021 • Family
Top!
Collection is unique and able to shed a light on the Etruscan culture but also on its commerces with Greece, thus being also very interesting the relationship between Etruscans and Greeks.
Location is very interesting, in a former Pope residence and at the border of the nicest park in Rome.
Personnel is of rare kindness and likes to help the visitor, the information/reception desk is particularly helpful and available. Same for the ticket office.
You have the impression to be welcome and that they like their job. Pretty impressive and unique!
Written 28 August 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MarkW632
Manchester, UK339 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2023 • Solo
This is a great museum away from the main throng of tourists, who aren’t attracted be something that isn’t Russell Crow-Gladiator related. Consequently, it’s never over run, unlike so many of Rome’s attractions. The collection has some standout pieces that you could restrict your time to if stuck for time - otherwise it could take you the bulk of the day if you want to get the most out of it. The main material remnants of Etruscan society are terracotta poetry and bronze artefacts, and thus these make the bulk of the collection. The museum itself it situated in beautiful gardens with a gorgeous Etruscan temple reconstruction (Alatri Temple) that give you a sense of what the Etruscans would have lived amongst, rather than the colourless ruins we’ve become accustomed to. My main criticism, and why the museum only gets 3/5, is some of the English text explaining the pieces is truly baffling. The rather evocative Tarquinia tomb (easy to miss, in the basement) is spoilt by the fact that the accompanying text makes zero sense, provokes multiple re-reads and amounts to sheer gobbledygook.
Written 22 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Tualie
Varese, Italy1,528 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2022
Artifacts, jewels and lots of pottery. Impossible to miss their highlight, the sarcophagus of the spouses and the bilingual Pyrgi tablets (in Etruscan and Phoenician). The building where houses the museum was the personal home of Pope Julius III (hence the name) in the XVI century and many artists contributed to its design like Vasari and Michelangelo.

The museum was empty when we visited, finally some space and breath in contrast to the famous Roman sites. Although I found a bit boring the museum (had visited in the past very interesting Etruscan necropoli, in-site visit experiences) is a museum that hosts an important collection from an ancient and mysterious preRoman civilization.

P.S. is possible to arrive there with the public transport, streetcar 19 from Ottaviano metro station area, close to the Vatican.
Written 12 March 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ioanna C
11 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2023
After spending an hour relaxing in the peaceful empty garden I noticed an information packed museum. Many floors and pieces, from the tomb of the famous Etruscan couple to countless daily life objects, masks, trinkets... everything well catalogued and described. it was much more than I had expected. there is a whole wing dedicated just to vases. An archaeologist was working on the ground floor, cleaning and cataloguing pieces of pottery, it was fascinating to watch. Still, the garden with mosaics, sculptures and a wall of wisteria was a well needed refuge from the streets of Rome. I would like to go again.
Written 26 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

FCMCHI 32
2 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2022 • Couples
A beautiful collection, housed in a villa in the Borghese Gardens. The Sarcophagus of the Spouses is the unequalled highlight, but there is much more to appreciate. It’s not crowded so you will have a respite from the more well known Roman spots. To get there try a cab from the Piazza del Popolo cab stand, the ride should be about 5-6 Euros. But once having oriented yourself getting there, walk back at the end of your visit. You’ll skirt the park and end up on the very interesting Via Flaminia. It has restaurants for a full meal and bars for an aperitif.
Written 17 September 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Yog-Sothoth
Trenton, ME1,235 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020
...but can be a little overwhelming. Be prepared to see a lot of pottery (much of it very beautiful, btw). The story of the Etruscan people is dealt with in thorough fashion; most exhibits are explained well in Italian and English. There are upwards of 35 rooms here, though, so it's a lot.
Written 8 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Enid W
St Clears, UK6 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2023 • Couples
What an amazing museum of Etruscan artefacts housed in the atmospheric 16th Century Villa of Pope Julius 111. No need to book, easy to get to - just a short ride on the 150F bus from Termini. Modern and laid out like a gallery internally & air conditioned. Not to be missed. Also Villa Pontiatowski nearby. It's fading splendour houses some interesting exhibits, particularly the last room with it's sumptuous grave goods from one tomb.
Written 28 September 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

tiz S
Rome, Italy191 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2018 • Friends
Great collection with extremely long and wordy labels meant to confuse the visitor! To facilitate your visit here are 14 suggested stops:
1. Entrance: Map on the right wall.
As you look on the right wall of the entrance notice on the map that Etruria is situated between the river Arno in Tuscany and the river Tiber. Etruria is the old name for Tuscany.
Etruscans dominated the central part of the Italic peninsula during the late 8th through the 5th centuries BC. The civilization reached its peak in the 6th century BC.
2. Entrance: Display case on the left with the Greek amphora painted by the so-called Berlin Painter.
Etruscans acquired and imported Athenian pots in vast numbers, with the consequence that a very large proportion of approx. 30,000 surviving Greek pots come from Etruscan tombs. What was it about these Athenian pots that appealed to the Etruscans? It is still an open question to many.
This amphora was looted from an Etruscan tomb and acquired illegally by the Met. After a long trial it was returned to Italy (the same happened to two vases signed by Euphronios, now in Cerveteri Museum).
3. Room #1, display cases: Two hut-shaped urns.
The hut urns were used from about 1000 until 700 BC and were shaped like huts. An old theory proposed that the form was inspired by Mycenaean contacts with Italy, but this is improbable. Modern historians believe that they reflected housing structures that were used in life–simple mud-and-straw shelters. A difficult question to answer is why were the remains of certain individuals buried in hut urns rather than in the more common urn?
4. Room #1 and #2: parade chariot, helmet, leg-guards and round shield.
In addition to written records, the archaeological record provides a lot of evidence for the Etruscan military and warfare. Tombs of wealthy Etruscans usually contain many varieties of shields, helms, armor and weaponry. Military historians claim that Etruscans adopted Greek military tactics and weapons.
5. Room #5: Cases with thanks-offerings: breast, feet, uterus, male genitals, heads, ears, etc.
The most impressive thing about the anatomical votives of Etruria are the sheer numbers in which they were found. One site contained 1,600 votive feet, made of terracotta. Another had more than 400 terracotta wombs. Overall, in approx. 150 Etruscan sites, archaeologists have uncovered tens of thousands of feet, legs, arms, hands, etc. Why did ancient Etruscans bury thousands of clay body parts? Anatomical votive offerings were gifts for the gods, including the healer god, Asclepius, and crowded the walls, ceilings and floors of temples. They are considered an expression of the interaction and communication between donor and deity.
6. Take the spiral staircase to the basement to see the painted "Tomb of the Funerary Bed."
Etruscan painting is all the more important because we have completely lost all trace of Greek painting. We can only imagine how Greek painting may have looked by studying the decorations in some of the exceptional Etruscan tombs, where experts have suggested that Greek artists might have arrived in Italy to decorate the last resting places of wealthy Etruscans.
The paintings with dancers, boxers, charioteers, discus throwers, acrobatic horse-riders, musicians and other entertainers in the “Tomb of the Funerary Bed” give us a considerable insight into the Etruscan way of life. The Etruscans were famous for their sumptuous banquets, drinking parties, and general easy-living. Such pleasures were restricted to the wealthy elites. Diodorus Siculus, the 1st-century BC Greek historian wrote:
“As they inhabit a land fertile in fruits of all kinds and cultivate it assiduously, they enjoy an abundance of agricultural produce which not only is sufficient for them but by its excess leads them to unbridled luxury and indolence.” In addition to finding joy in dance and music, the Etruscans also found it in extreme violence. Etruscan funeral rites sometimes included human sacrifice of the owners’ slaves. Some slaves had to engage in ritualistic battle until death. These may have been the first “gladiators.”
7. Basement: Photo with an Etruscan eternal embrace, Museum of fine Arts, Boston.
The top of the sarcophagus takes the form of a bed with pillows, and a man and his wife embrace under a large sheet. Etruscan society clearly celebrated both marriage and sex.
8. Room #11: Vase showing Odysseus and his companions blinding the Cyclops Polyphemus.
This vase is not Greek but shows strong artistic influence from Greece. It was produced in Cerveteri by immigrant craftsmen and it was not meant to be exported out of the city.
9. Room #12: The Sarcophagus of the Spouses.
This sarcophagus is considered one of the great masterpieces of Etruscan art. It was found in Cerveteri and represents a married couple reclining at a banquet. The portrayal of a married couple sharing a banqueting couch is distinctly an Etruscan style. In contrast, Greek vases depicting banquet scenes reflect the well-established Greek custom that only men attended dinner parties. The two figures are smiling and expressing affection, which means a positive attitude towards life and death. She was originally making the gesture of offering perfume, which was probably an essential component of Etruscan funerary rituals.
A similar sarcophagus, also from Cerveteri, is in the Louvre in Paris.
10. Room #: Terracotta relief from a temple with myth of the “The Seven Against Thebes.”
Why did violent imagery appeal to the Etruscans? This remains an open question.
The story of “The Seven Against Thebes” was extremely violent and popular in Greece during the classical period. According to the story, the two sons of Oedipus, Eteocles and Polynices, had agreed to alternate as king year by year. But this was a monumentally bad idea. In the era of primitive city-states, it guaranteed that the government would be unstable, and invited foreign attack. But for some reason, the town went along with it. Eteocles ruled for the first year. As the end of the year approached, Eteocles let it be known that he would remain king. He had a stable government, and he thought it was not in the interest of his city (or his own interest) to give Polynices his turn. Polynices gathered an alliance of the nearby Greek town of Argos to take Thebes and replace Eteocles’s administration permanently. Eteocles sent his seven bravest champions outside the seven gates of Thebes against the best seven of Argos. With the war at a stalemate, Eteocles fights his brother at gate seven where both are killed. Dissatisfaction with the old tyrannical world is at the heart of the tragedies of the Greek author Aeschylus.
11. Rooms #18 and #19: Etruscan bronze mirrors and “bucchero” ware.
Bronze hand mirrors were a characteristic product of the Etruscans and provide much information about Etruscan bronze technology. Most importantly, the wealth of information they convey makes them a resource comparable to Greek painted vases. They were very often decorated on the backs with scenes from daily life and Greek mythology.
The type of pottery known as “bucchero” is typical of ancient Etruria. The black Etruscan less-expensive ceramic was an alternative to the desirable but costly metal products arriving from the east.
12. Room #40: Monumental statues of Apollo and Hercules, once decorating a temple.
The Apollo and Hercules are life-size painted terracotta statues designed to be placed at the highest part of a temple. The myth narrates the contention between the god and the hero for the possession of the doe with the golden horns. There was probably also a statue of Mercury united to this group, of which only the head and a part of the body remain. Apollo advances (held a bow originally) and Heracles is leaning forwards to attack. The architecture of the ancient Etruscans was derived from that of the Greeks, and went on to influence that of early Rome.
13. Outside: Reconstruction of the Etruscan Temple of Aletrium in the courtyard.
The Etruscans characteristically used stone only for the base or podium of a temple. The walls were of unfired brick, covered with plaster, and the columns and beams of timber - plentiful in Etruria. The exposed wooden elements of the superstructure were protected by terracotta decorations. Together with the stone substructure, the temple terracottas often survive as our best evidence for the original appearance of Etruscan buildings. Have you noticed the angel-like winged Victory figures (Nike) on top?
14. Outside: Nymphaeum (a garden structure linked to water and the nymphs) in the courtyard Julius III, 1550s, an example of Renaissance architecture. The signature of the architect Bartolomeo Ammanati is visible to the far right.
Written 29 October 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alexandra H
Paris, France132 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2018 • Solo
Unfortunately, due to censorship practiced by Italian TA I'm not allowed to go into detail about the bad treatment you will receive from the staff. The collection and grounds are beautiful, but there is no documentation or guidance to help you learn about it. Don't bother asking the staff because they don't care about visitors, don't speak English, and make it clear they resent your existence.
Written 26 September 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Eva Cartwright
London, UK84 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2015 • Couples
I was baffled to find that probably the most amazing collection of Etruscan Art of this planet is not mobbed, and that only a few people lingered in this magnificent building apart from us. Being a British Museum member, I am used to hundreds and hundreds of people around me interested in collections so rare and unique - yet there isn't even a visitors café in Villa Giulia - obviously it is not worth keeping one open. Still, it is their loss: we spent almost an entire day here, and would return at any time happily. When interested in Etruscan Art and history, it is worth also seeing the Vatican's collection at the Vatican Museum.
Written 3 February 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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MUSEO NAZIONALE ETRUSCO DI VILLA GIULIA (2024) All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

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