Ss. Quattro Coronati
Ss. Quattro Coronati
4.5
Historic SitesReligious SitesChurches & Cathedrals
4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Monday
10:00 AM - 11:45 AM
4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Tuesday
10:00 AM - 11:45 AM
4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 11:45 AM
4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 11:45 AM
4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Friday
10:00 AM - 11:45 AM
4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 11:45 AM
4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
Sunday
4:00 PM - 5:45 PM
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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Celio
How to get there
  • Colosseo • 6 min walk
  • Fori Imperiali-Colosseo • 6 min walk
Reach out directly

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles235 reviews
Excellent
149
Very good
73
Average
10
Poor
0
Terrible
3

MarcusHurley
Calne, UK10,384 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2023
This is a large church situated near the Colosseum. Originally built in the fourth century it was destroyed by the Normans and then rebuilt in the eleventh century as both a church and a fortress. It has beautiful colonnaded porticoes and some wonderful frescoes inside, depicting the martyrdom of the saints it is named after. There is also an amazing sense of serenity inside, totally peaceful.
Written 10 February 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Noraatc
Sudbury, MA38,725 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2022 • Solo
Unfortunately, the ancient basilica was closed when I tried to visit it, but the outer courtyard with beautiful porticos and frescoes was opened and it was enough for me to feel the atmosphere of this sight. It was definitely worth climbing the hill on the narrow and rather atmospheric street (I was coming from the nearby Basilica San Clemente).

There were no tourists in sight and I had the old walls to myself. Luckily, I had seen the interior years ago, but if you want to see it now, plan carefully as the opening hours are restricted.
Written 9 February 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ric64
Rome, Italy48 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2014 • Friends
If you really want to see something off tourists tracks, yet close to the Colosseum, go to this Monastery.
The church itself has been destroyed and rebuilt several times, but the real hidden treasures in this Monastery are the Cloister and the Oratorio di San Silvestro.
Both can be visited AFTER 5 PM, as the nuns are retired in prayer before that time.
The Cloister can be visited by ringing a bell on the left side of the abside of the church.
The Oratorio is located before entering the church on the right. You have to ring a bell, a nun will respond by coming to a little window and will hand you the key to the front door. Behind the door, the Oratorio, with unique frescos of 1200 on its walls. Most likely you will be the only one visiting and you will be able to enjoy this gem on your own, in compete silence. A free offer is required for both the cloister and the Oratorio; 2 or 3 € are enough, but I can assure you that it's worth 10 times!!
Written 27 May 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brad
Hong Kong, China173,724 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2024 • Family
The Basilica and Monastery of Santi Quattro Coronati is located around half way between the Colosseum and Basilica San Giovanni in Laterano and a couple minutes walk from Basilica di San Clemente.

What you will find is a 4th or 5th-century complex with a fortified palace, courtyards and basilica with frescoed walls, decorative apse and nice artworks. Unfortunately, the notable Chapel of St. Silvester found near the first courtyard entrance was not open on the day we passed by. This was disappointing but the rest of the basilica and monastery made for a nice brief visit. Worth 15-20 minutes of your time if sightseeing in the are and not in a rush.
Written 23 April 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Belgo96
Brisbane, Australia3,464 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2014 • Friends
Just down the road from the monument to indiscriminate slaughter which is the Colosseum, there is something far more interesting for the discerning tourist. Within the church of Santi Quattro Coronati, the Chapel of San Silvester is an astounding historical document. Visitors must ring a bell for the nuns to grant entry upon payment of a donation (suggest 5 - 10 Euro, what you will see is certainly worth it). Inside on the walls of this remarkable chapel is a vivid 13th century fresco cycle portraying the conversion of Constantine to Christianity. The scenes displaying Constantine's plague-stricken body and wailing Roman mothers still have an emotional impact and the final scene depicting Emperor kneeling before Pope is an immensely significant moment in European history. If you are fortunate you may be in the chapel alone because most visitors to this city prefer its more obvious attractions.
Written 15 October 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Pier Carlo G
Latte, Italy244 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2016 • Couples
If you would like to experience the feel of the real ROME, try this walk and visit.
This is also sold as a guided tour, and of course that is the best approach to this attraction. Yet, if your money is really tight, or you are a terrible cheapskate, you can do this on your own ande enjoy anyway.
I recommend to start from the Colosseo square, walking up Via dei Santi Quattro Coronati, take the rising steps and turn right to the cathedral small square.
This ancient complex of buildings in the form of fortress includes a main church, a monastery, a chapel, and several cloisters. Besides the architectural aspects, that range from Romanic to medieval to gothic, the monastery still is nowadays home to Augustinian nuns. This alone would be worth a visit, I do not mean to tell you more because I would like it to be a surprise, just rely on the nuns to let you discover the whole thing. Pay extreme attentions to the opening hourse. when I visited it only was after 5 PM due to the fact that nuns are busy before.
A last all-important detail, those who are catholic and would like to join in the prays, can be hosted for small money in clean, basic rooms, an experience that I really recommend.
Written 11 November 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

m c
Rome, Italy13 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2016 • Friends
An incredible guided tour (obligatory and only available on limited days per month as it is STILL a Convent!) Do Not Miss the Gothic Hall! A recently revealed addition to the city's rich Art History but unique in its genre for Rome. A Visit to the whole complex is highly recommended as it also embodies various eras of Rome's history. It is very well preserved as it has been continually in use and the most recent discoveries have been painstakingly restored. Each Gothic Hall visit is thankfully guided in both English and Italian (request which language required) and some guides were even part of the actual restoration team but all are able to also respond to questions about the site on behalf of the Nuns who still live in the convent and have only recently given their approval for such tours! Both truly peaceful and informative, unusual mix for a Rome tourist attraction
Written 13 August 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Cipsontheroad
Rome, Italy71 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Friends
If you wish to elevate the soul attend a Sunday service of the agostinian cloister nuns in an incredible roman basilica that displays an amazing overlapping of architectural modifications that go from the VI century to XVII. A total delight to a lover of architectural style and design.
Written 14 April 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

234worldtraveler567
Boston, MA152 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2018 • Couples
The church itself is very dark inside, making it hard to see the frescoes. The cloisters are also worth seeing. But the real reason for coming here is to see San Silvestro Chapel, which is separate from the church, but it is not always open during its advertised hours. In the courtyard, look for a door marked Monache Agostinio. If the door is open, go in and ring the buzzer in the far left corner by the wooden drum. A nun will open the window. Pass her at least 1 Euro per person, and she will let you into the chapel, which has excellent frescoes from 1246 and a great Cosmatesque floor.
Written 26 November 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brun066
Florence, Italy13,213 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2017 • Business
... as this actually is part of the sloppiness that often is found in Rome. But Rome is also a place of a cultural accumulation with few equals in the world, whose this church-convent is one of the most illustrious and hidden places.
Everyone today associates the Pope's residence with St. Peter church and the Vatican Palaces. But this is true only after the return of the Popes from their residence in Avignon, France (1309-1377). Previously, and almost continuously since 313 A. D., the Pope's residence was the Palazzo del Laterano, near the homonymous basilica.
And since the premises of the "Santi Quattro Coronati", not far from the Laterano, were located in a more defensible position, and since the 9th century they were even fortified, during the frequent periods of insecurity they were the actual Pope's residence.
This explains, inter alia, because the wonderful, vivid frescoes into the Oratory of San Silvestro, on the right side of the church (mid-thirteenth century; the Oratory is accessed by an offer to the nuns which since the sixteenth century occupy the church-monastery) are largely devoted to illustrate the story at the origin of the so-called "Donation of Constantine".
The "Donation" is a fake document attested for the first time in the 9th century. According to it, in 315 A. D. Emperor Constantine attributed to the Church of Rome the power over the western half of the Roman Empire, and many other privileges.
This way, the lords and representatives of the Christian world who visited the Pope, if they were introduced in the Oratory of San Silvestro, received a striking message about the leadership of the Pope, even over the Emperor of the Holy Roman (Western) Empire.
But other parts of the monastery are unforgettable: I mention, for example, the Oratory of Santa Barbara, which is accessed from the cloister, mentioned since the 9th century but probably older, whose vault is supported by shelves shaped like capitals, which remember those into the Byzantine church of San Vitale in Ravenna (6th century).
Much more in this monastery is remarkable. But let's conclude that this monument tells us of an era among the least-known ones (the high Middle Ages in Europe) when it was in fact, and for long periods, the headquarters of the leader of Western Christianity.
Written 16 June 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Ss. Quattro Coronati, Rome

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