Chiesa di San Benedetto in Piscinula

Chiesa di San Benedetto in Piscinula, Rome: Address, Phone Number, Chiesa di San Benedetto in Piscinula Reviews: 4.5/5

Chiesa di San Benedetto in Piscinula

Chiesa di San Benedetto in Piscinula
4.5
Points of Interest & Landmarks
What people are saying
Intense spirituality
May 2020
Tradition has it that this church was built in the 'Domus Aniciorum' and that St. Benedict, the founder of western monasticism, belonged to the Anicii noble family. What is certain is that the church already existed in the 12th century and it is mentioned in some medieval documents. Probably it is a place where a young St. Benedict stayed for a while, before going off to be a hermit at Subiaco. The church dates back to the 11th century and underwent renovations in 1481 and 1835. The current façade was built in 1844 by Pietro Campores the Younger. In 1782 the bishop Giuseppe De Sarrado rededicated his altar in solemn form. It is preceded by a vestibule which on the left has a chapel, on whose external wall there is a fresco of the XIII century of the Giotto school: the Madonna nursing the Child with St. Peter or St. Paul on the sides. In the chapel, on the left, is the image of the Madonna painted in fresco in the thirteenth century. The bell tower, which is the smallest in Rome and has the oldest bell dating back to the 11th century, is of the same period. The interior has three naves divided by four ancient columns on each side, with marble capitals. Noteworthy is the original Cosmatesque floor which was executed in the early 12th century, which has been conserved rathen than restored. The title "in Piscinula", which some have transformed by corruption into "Pescivola", probably derives from an ancient fish market that existed in that district. Behind the high altar there are frescoes from the 14th century and paintings from the Venetian school of the early 16th century like "Our Lady Queen of Heaven" with allegorical representations of the Trinity, and, in a side chapel, the painting "Madonna and Child with SS Benedict and Lawrence". We have visited this small church in the heart of Trastevere twice. What struck us most was not necessarily the set of some valuable artistic pieces, but the atmosphere of an intense mysticism and religiosity.

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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Trastevere
Trastevere ("beyond the Tiber") is like a faded postcard, a little worn around the edges but still charming. With its wide-open piazzas, meandering streets, weathered Renaissance buildings, and overgrown personality, it's become an irresistible mecca for visitors. Trastevere is an enclave of entertainment - a rotating set of street performers entertains almost every night, and unforgettable eateries and bars pepper its piazzas and side streets. For a trip to the past, visit the southern and western flanks of Trastevere for pockets of yesteryear, less traversed areas with a residual 1960s and 70s Roman vibe.
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4.5
30 reviews
Excellent
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11
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3
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dapper777
Monaco31,938 contributions
Intense spirituality
May 2020 • Friends
Tradition has it that this church was built in the 'Domus Aniciorum' and that St. Benedict, the founder of western monasticism, belonged to the Anicii noble family.
What is certain is that the church already existed in the 12th century and it is mentioned in some medieval documents.
Probably it is a place where a young St. Benedict stayed for a while, before going off to be a hermit at Subiaco.
The church dates back to the 11th century and underwent renovations in 1481 and 1835. The current façade was built in 1844 by Pietro Campores the Younger.
In 1782 the bishop Giuseppe De Sarrado rededicated his altar in solemn form.
It is preceded by a vestibule which on the left has a chapel, on whose external wall there is a fresco of the XIII century of the Giotto school: the Madonna nursing the Child with St. Peter or St. Paul on the sides. In the chapel, on the left, is the image of the Madonna painted in fresco in the thirteenth century.
The bell tower, which is the smallest in Rome and has the oldest bell dating back to the 11th century, is of the same period.
The interior has three naves divided by four ancient columns on each side, with marble capitals.
Noteworthy is the original Cosmatesque floor which was executed in the early 12th century, which has been conserved rathen than restored.
The title "in Piscinula", which some have transformed by corruption into "Pescivola", probably derives from an ancient fish market that existed in that district.
Behind the high altar there are frescoes from the 14th century and paintings from the Venetian school of the early 16th century like "Our Lady Queen of Heaven" with allegorical representations of the Trinity, and, in a side chapel, the painting "Madonna and Child with SS Benedict and Lawrence".
We have visited this small church in the heart of Trastevere twice.
What struck us most was not necessarily the set of some valuable artistic pieces, but the atmosphere of an intense mysticism and religiosity.
Written 19 June 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

JHGS343
Sugar Land, TX127 contributions
Spiritually moving
Jun 2017 • Couples
It seems odd to rate a church but I think it's worthwhile to let others know, especially pilgrims to Rome, that this is a quiet and deeply spiritual place. No great art, very much not Baroque, but quiet, peaceful, unlike (sadly) too many churches in Rome there is a daily Mass. The church has links to St. Benedict and has the smallest church bell in Rome. If you find yourself in Trastevere, stop by the Piazza in Piscinula in the early evening and visit -- and pray.
Written 10 July 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Maggi713
Baltimore, MD10,440 contributions
Interesting Church!
Jan 2017 • Friends
Tucked away in the corner of the Piazza in Piscinula, you will find this small, but very interesting church. This church was built on the remains of the houses belonging to the family of Anici. Step inside and admire the numerous frescoes dating back to the middle ages, in addition to the remains of a wonderful cosmatesque (geometric) floor, returned to light after a complete renovation. You can visit the small space where it is believed St. Benedict lived before choosing the life of a hermit, praying to the image of the Madonna located to the left of the Church. The most striking element of the building is the 11th-century bell tower: the smallest in Rome, it almost disappears among the roofs of the buildings. The bell, dated 1069, measures just 17+ inches in diameter, and is the oldest in the city.
Written 12 February 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Bea H
Leuven, Belgium10 contributions
Beautiful little hidden church
May 2016 • Friends
The entrance to this little Roman church in Trastevere is nothing special. And if it was not for a few touristists who came out of it, we wouldn't have noticed it. But once you're inside ...it really is a little gem. A very old little church with wooden beams and wallpaintings in soft pastels. Though tiny, it still has the structure of a big church.
Written 1 June 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

El_Pippon
Rome, Italy7 contributions
Very authentic old chapell
Jul 2015 • Family
We got a short tour by one the brothers. Beautiful but not always open. Probably one of the best preserved church from early mid-age.
Written 25 July 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

phillytraveleramo
philadelphia43 contributions
An oasis in Trastevere
Jun 2015 • Couples
We learned about this perfect little church on a Context Travel tour (of the Roman Ghetto--also highly recommended). Its Cosmatesque floors have not been ground down as other church's have, and it is entirely perfect in its imperfection. Tiny, wooden, sparsely decorated, with beautiful shafts of light, it's a holy place of rest and reflection even if you're not religious. It's nestled in and a bit tricky to find--and do check the hours, as it's open even less frequently than other churches. My favorite church in Rome.
Written 10 July 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Rose M
Solingen135 contributions
Possibly the most beautiful chapel ever?
Jun 2015 • Couples
One entered into a total small enclosed and yet beautifully adorned chapel. One felt that it is actively used and also that each item has a special meaning and a special place. It's very old, and you can learn about its history from information on the wall....
Written 6 July 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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