Corridoio Vasariano
Corridoio Vasariano
4.5
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4.5
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Jo_and_Tom
Anna, OH1,943 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2020
This is walkway from the Uffzi to Ponte Vecchio and Pettit Palace. It follows the river with the Medici Gallery on the side. The Gallery was under construction so we couldn't take it. The walk was beautiful with many shops along its sides. The buidling along the river and very old with many being in families for generations
Written 8 April 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Julie L
Melbourne, Australia1,366 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2016 • Couples
We booked via Viator (FlorencePass) for Florence Medici Tour: Palazzo Vecchio and Vasari Corridor Walking Tour - and we loved it!!
Why is it special?
Firstly, it was the passageway used by the Medici family to move from the Palazzo Vecchio to the Pitti Palace.
Secondly, it is an area that is restricted to the public and only accessible to small groups with a licensed tour operator who, once in the corridor, must abide, like the tour group, with the instrucitons of the two Government (?) officials who accompany the group on the tour inside the corridor.
Thirdly, in the corridor, one sees incredible art.
Fourthly, the views from the corridor out (from the Ponte Vecchio) are unique.

At the start of the tour we went into the Uffizi Gallery to a "special door" where we awaited a gallery official to open it. Then we descended some stairs for the start of the tour along the mysterious corridor. How exciting!

The corridor is narrow so no wonder they restrict numbers entering. On our tour, I moved to hear the tour group leader and my bag inadvertently went close to the wall / painting and I was duly chastised by the Government official. (Quite rightly so).

The tour finished at the end of the corridor via an exit at the Boboli gardens. It was interesting to emerge into the sun and light into the gardens. I felt like a young child emerging from a secret hiding place!

The Vasari Corridor is closed now for refurbishment until 2018. Make sure you go there when it reopens. It is a unique experience.
Written 15 May 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

cho10
Milan, Italy231 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2016 • Friends
The Vasari Passage (a.k.a. Corridor) is a passageway that connects Palazzo Vecchio starting from the top flor of the Uffizi) to Palazzo Pitti located on the other side of the river Arno. It passes through and along some of Florence’s most important buildings crossing over the Ponte Vecchio and, during the warmer months of the year) ends up in the Boboli Gardens.

Visits are limited to single groups of 10 to 20 people accompanied by a licensed guide.

Access is solely at an allotted time and usually for one group at a time.

Your group will be accompanied by two Uffizi custodians that will make sure that people don't stray or lag behind.

Access to the Vasari Passage is through a an electronically locked.door located
on the top floor close to the Botticelli Room.

There are apparently security concerns that oblige the Uffizi management
to limit the visits this way.

Your group is supposed to be waiting in front of that door a few minutes before
the assigned visit time.

Once you go through that door there is a steep and long descending staircase that leads to a few rooms where the true visit starts.

Presently access to people with physical disabilities is difficult if not impossible

The passage was built in the 1500's to allow the members of the ruling Medici family to go to Palazzo Pitti and also to attend mass without mixing with people in the streets. They could observe what was happening below at the beginning of the passage from normal iron grated windows and then from from round iron grated windows that are positioned at about 15 feet (5 meters) from one another.

The Passage turns a sharp left onto the Ponte Vecchio and it is truly interesting that people below on the bridge won't realize that they are being observed.

The Vasari Passage houses an exceptional collection of paintings including one of the most extensive set of self portraits by Durer (possibly a copy of the Prado original), Chagall, Filippo Lippi, Rembrandt, Velazquez, Delacroix and others.

Our guide told us that the first paintings were purchased by members of the Medici family. As time passed the family started receiving paintings as donations from the artists themselves. Such donations have continued over the past 500 years and there are apparently more paintings in the Vasari Passage collection than space to exhibit them.

The visit to the Vasari Passage will last between 90 minutes and 2 hours. Photography is allowed (NO FLASH).

The cost per person is around 80 to 90 Euros. The admission fee to the Uffizi is an additional charge. To save time it is a good idea to buy both in advance. When you book the Vasari Passage visit through an authorized travel agent you will be offered a package that includes the separate Uffizi admission charge.

Our guide (from florencetown.com) was named Marzia who was a very knowledgeable and pleasant professional. It takes talent to avoid being doctrinaire or condescending when you are explaining to lay people (as most of us were) not just the beauty of a huge number of works of art (your eyes will suffice) but also filling you in on the history behind them without being boring.

The Vasari Passage will be closed for refurbishing starting in late 2016 for a couple of years.

Let's hope that the charm we experienced during our visit won't have gone lost when this truly exceptional gallery reopens.
Written 23 November 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MihaiWiseguy
Cluj-Napoca, Romania88 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2012 • Family
We have first visited Florence in 2000 and then heard about the Vasari corridor and the 6 months in advance reservations to see it. Then, I tried to book this attraction for my parents in law when they visited Florence in 2010, but could not find available tickets for their days in the city, 3 months in advance. You can imagine my thrill when, this November, I was confirmed 3 tickets for the Vasari corridor (and Uffizzi gallery) on the occassion on my second visit to Florence. No matter I paid 95 Euro per ticket (no discounts of any kind are applicable). The reservation was made through a specialised agency (Florence Museums). The voucher received by mail indicated a meeting point to be reached 15 minutes before the tour time. Only when arrived to the Uffizi, I realised that the meeting point was at a different address, far away from the gallery and difficult to find even on the map. Eventually, after several phones to the agency, we managed to join our group. For the 95 Euro, you get a guided tour of the Uffizzi gallery (which is quite educational) headphones and the chance to visit the so mysterious Vasari corridor. The corridor was built by Vasari, the house architect of the Medici family with the purpose of connecting the former (Palazzo Vecchio) and the new residence (Palazzo Pitti) of the Medicis. The corridor starts with a small passarelle linking te last floor of Palazzo Veccchio to Uffizzi, then the route continues through the regular rooms of the Uffizis and, finally, you enter the corridor through a door in the Uffizzis. The passarelle and this particular part of the corridor were built anew by Vasari. This is also the starting point of the visit. The passage runs in parralel with the Uffizi towards the Arno river, then turns right and follows the Arno shore on top of a suspended structure similar to a viaduct, then crosses Ponte Vecchio on top of the existing buildings and continues on the other side of the river Arno through Boboli gardens till inside the Pitti palace; altoghether, 1km and 3.5 hours, but the visit stops at the Boboli gardens. Inside the corridor is the largest collection of self-portraits in Italy together with less famous paintings. On both sides of the passage there are small windows which the Medicis used to spy on the people in the city. One window opens inside one of the oldest church in Florence; for this, Vasari had to demolish the front part of the church. In fact, all houses on the route, except one on Ponte vecchio, were demolished in order to get a straight line for the corridor.

Overall, its' a nice tour, but only having the privilege of walking a secret passage it's not worth the effort and the price; unless you really love paintings and want to see the self portraits exhibition. I really think it would have been interesting enough to see it from outside, if it would been shown on a map (but it isn't and when you're inside you think it would have been so obvious to note it).
Written 13 November 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

lindahallam
Bedfordshire, UK2 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019
Please be aware that the Vasari Corridor that you are paying for is NOT a walk through the corridor but rather a meander outside which you could see yourself with a tiny bit of research. We met a guide at the appointed time and started to walk through the square but when we queried when we were going through the corridor we were informed that the actual corridor was closed for renovation work until 2020! One couple on the tour immediately left and although we continued on felt that we had been sold something that we were not actually being able to experience. This so called Vasari Corridor experience is l feel being sold under false pretences so beware.
Written 20 May 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jempie
Bruges, Belgium54 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2015 • Couples
Thanks to Dan Brown's "Inferno", we learned about the existence of this secret elevated passageway, leading from the Uffizi to the gardens of the Pitti Pallace, on the other side of the Arno. Built in the 16th century for the Medici family, who wanted to discreetly walk the 1 kilometre distance above the crowds, in all security. In time, this became a museum in itself, with some 1,000 paintings on the walls, staccato one after another, mostly self-portraits of great (like Rembrandt) and lesser known artists, or artists that everybody knows for other talents than painting. The Medicis also offered this walk to their special, mostly aristocratic guests. In recent times, Mussolini invited Hitler here, and had even some larger windows installed for the occasion, in the middle of the passage over the Ponte Vecchio. Which explains why the Germans, upon leaving Florence under threat of the advancing Americans at the end of the Second World War, explicitly "saved" this bridge, while they destroyed all the other bridges in Florence. Today, it still is rather an exclusive attraction for a limited number of visitors, almost only over noon. You have to search the Internet well in advance to find the specific offer and make a reservation, which doesn't come cheap (we paid 118 € for two tickets). But the rewards are without comparison, certainly if you happen to get one of the best guides in the city, which is almost always so (they are really happy to be able to come working for you in this very exclusive place they all love).
Written 16 April 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sharon D
Melbourne, Australia9 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2014 • Couples
We stumbled across the Vasari Corridor in an obscure reference (it doesn't appear to be widely publicised). After enquiries with our most helpful local accomodation hosts, they initially said "sorry, it's closed". After some persistence they found limited tours are available and we booked immediately. Do it, this was one of our highlights of a European tour and the probably best-kept secret of Florence.
Groups are deliberately small and they are few. If you're visiting during the tourist season, definitely book ahead.
The corridor was built so the Medici could travel to and from their offices in Palazzo Vecchio and the Pitti Palace - it is around a kilometre in length and was originally knocked through rooms of houses that were inconveniently in the way. Apparently the Medici didn't like to get their feet wet. And there was always the risk of assassins :/
The Corridor is now lined with artworks and the world's largest collection of self-portraits. Apparently Hitler and Mussolini met in the middle of the Corridor, over the Ponte Vecchio.
A very intimate and privileged experience.
Written 31 December 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

jonathan186303
United Kingdom11 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2014 • Couples
I've been visiting Florence regularly since I was 11 years old, making my first trip up the Duomo with my mother, but didn't hear about Vasari's corridor until I was 17. When my wife asked what I wanted for my birthday, it was easy to pick a 10 day stay in the centre of this most wonderful city and a trip down the Vasari Corridor as part of that. I see that some people are disappointed with the quality of the art on the walls. It is essentially a self-portrait gallery full of samples of the artists' wares touting for patronage, rarely visited and if you go for the art, you may be disappointed.
However, if like me you go to walk down the private space where the Medici reputedly raced chariots pulled by big cats, fled riots, walked to mass or conducted affairs of state whilst moving between their palace and parliament, then I don't think you'll be disappointed. The experience begins with an anonymous door in the Uffizi before walking down a staircase past old masters devastated by the Mafia bombing and then into the series of corridors alongside the Arno, over the Ponte Vecchio, punching through private apartments and a church before arriving in the grounds of the Pitti Palace. The corridor actually connects with the palace itself, but when we visited, that entrance was closed.
Before visiting, do your research and pack your imagination. I waited over 30 years and wasn't disappointed.
Written 9 December 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Shortescapes
New York City, NY23 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2014 • Friends
We had dreamed of experiencing this curious part of Florence history for years, as it was a special passage way created by the Medici family to get to their official offices from their residence at the Pitti Palace without having to mingle with the riff-raff in the streets or, worse yet, endanger their lives. The tour companies provide a wonderful service, the history is indeed rich, and you get a few nice views, but you're paying a lot of money to go down a nice corridor filled with art of far less note than that in the Uffizi galleries from which you start. They have tried to jazz it up with corridors of self-portraits, a great idea except you have never heard of 90 percent of the people. The tour guide was pleasant and the company more than professional, but the cost was nearly $80, and the only reason we did it was we had heard it was one of the great experiences to have in Florence. We suspect it's part of that pyschology whereby if one person has been fooled he or she doesn't like to admit it and feels compelled to recommend it to others. I'd love to hear from someone justifying the high price. If it were priced near or around the other Florence museums, it'd be a different story, but it's understand that the logistics of managing crowds in this narrow corridor simply are not realistic.

Written 29 October 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Avila M
Indianapolis, IN11 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2014
Tour was 80 euro a person and not worth a dime. The only thing I can conclude is that because the corridor isn't temperature controlled they hang lessor quality, dark uncleared paintings there. Not worth the price of admission. Spend your time in The Uffizi not the corridor . Nice view from above the Ponte Vecchio looking out .
Written 8 May 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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