National Monument at Vitkov

National Monument at Vitkov

National Monument at Vitkov
4.5
Thursday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
About
Under the name National Liberation Memorial, the memorial was built in the years 1928–1938 in honour of the Czechoslovak legionaries; it was re-built and extended after the end of the WW2 in order to commemorate the second – anti-Nazi resistance. After 1948, it was used to promote national ideology and regime. Prominent representatives of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia were buried here. The mausoleum of Klement Gottwald was established here in 1953. The Memorial slowly started to be forgotten. After 1989, all of the remains buried here were taken away, however, for a long time particular utilisation was a subject of discussion. In 2001, the Vítkov National Memorial became part of a government resolution on rehabilitation and reconstruction of some memorials related to Czechoslovak history of the 20th century.
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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Žižkov
How to get there
  • Krizik • 7 min walk
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles327 reviews
Excellent
152
Very good
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35
Poor
4
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jwflory
United States81 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2021
Finding a way up can be tricky if you don't know Prague (there was construction happening when I went), but it is worth the visit and going inside the museum. Museum ticket was about $5 USD. The inside of the museum is mostly focused towards 20th century history of the Czechoslovakia from 1918 to 1989. There are also stairs to the top of the monument, from where you can see all of Prague. This alone is worth the ticket price. There is also a cafe inside the museum but they only accept cash, no card.
Written 21 November 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

macedonboy
Glasgow, UK185,717 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
Most of the reviewers only describe the monument to Jan Žižka, but not the museum in the national monument building, which is a bit sad, because the museum is fantastic.

The National monument museum has a great exhibition of the Czech and Slovak uprising during the latter stages of the Second World War. If you're visiting the monument and interested in history, I recommend visiting the museum. The museum also covers Czech and Slovak history from the beginning of the 20th century to the end of the Velvet Revolution. There's also a shrine tomb (or shrine) to Czech and Slovak heroes.

As for the monument to Jan Žižka, this is a huge equestrian statue. It's hard to believe just how large it is until you see it in person. It's absolutely worth the (difficult) climb up the hill just to see this monument alone.
Written 12 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Vagabond VanHams
Janesville, WI1,894 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2014 • Couples
The guidebooks and travel blogs refer many visitors to Charles Bridge, Old Town Square and Prague Castle, often overlooking this beautiful and stunning monument. Make sure you visit the "the must see's," but include a visit to Vitkov National Monument. Petrin Tower offered magnificent views of the city, but in our opinion none were better then at Vitkov. During the Naked Tour Guide's Nazi and Communist tour, our final stop brought us to a deserted and well manicured Vitkov National Monument.

On a Friday afternoon we saw no more than a dozen visitors walking the massive grounds that encompass the monument. A small fee allows visitors to a roof top terrace with 360 degree sweeping city views. Those views are drawing me back to Prague for a return visit. The Czech Tomb of the Unknown Solider lies in state here, as well as the extravagant Ceremonial Hall with a history very few outside of Prague may know. I cannot express how much I loved our visit to Vitkov National Monument, I would bypass Petrin Hill and many other attractions to revisit here. Czech history lives here and it's a shame there are not more visitors to learn the amazing story it has to tell. If you visit the usual tourist suspects, you should really plan a visit here.
Written 8 September 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

fatbear2000
Oxford, UK4,111 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2015 • Couples
The monument at Vitkov offers great views over the city and is well worth the walk up the hill to get there. The statue of Jan Zizka obviously is the centre piece and it is free to walk around, but it is also free to enter the hall with the tomb to the unknown soldier.

Entrance to the museum is 120 KCS and contains some fascinating history of the Czechs since World War I including the founding of Czechoslovakia in 1918, the Nazi occupation, the takeover of the communists and the fall of communism in 1989. There is also the Mausoleum for Klement Gottwald and all the efforts to keep him on display after his death.

One the second floor is also the delightful Café Vitkov ( which I have separately reviewed )
Written 29 March 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

HCarlen
London, UK13 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2016 • Friends
The monument, a vast horseman on top of a tall hill in middle of Vitkov can be seen for miles around, and behind it is a vast museum in a large, concrete building that looks like a power station, but is actually a collection of state rooms and ceremonial halls. The place is well staffed; there is a very nice cafeteria and absolutely the best view of Prague from the 4th floor viewing platform.

The museum gives a really fascinating, modern, well put together, account of the history of Czech republic since 1918, and is a must-go for anyone with any interest in the history or politics of the area. I learnt a huge amount. Good translation into English throughout.

Altogether, however, it's very very strange! On the face of it, this should be a major tourist attraction, but none of the tours seem to take it in and there is no signage to the place at any point. Approach is up unsigned, very steep paths from the road that runs along the bottom of the hill , or via a gate at the Eastern end of the hill, up a long avenue through a well kept park - but again no signage. No vehicles are allowed to drive through the park although there is a massive empty car park at the end by the museum. The hill comprises attractive woods with some nice bike tracks all through, and a long, well-kept grassy park at the top, with the monument at the end of a long grand avenue. The park is beautiful in its own right. It has well equipped children's playgrounds, some fitness equipment, many benches and wonderful views. But when we went, on a brilliant sunny Sunday in September between 10am and 3pm, it was almost UTTERLY DESERTED. Though this is a city full of flats without gardens, we did not see a single child in any of the play areas, or anywhere else on the hill. There were no young lovers on the benches, No families on the grass. A handful of dog walkers and teenage bikers passed us and a few tourists. But so few that often there was no-one else in sight in any direction. And we appeared to be the only visitors in the museum.

Our only guess was that unspeakable things happened there in the communist era and the locals view the whole place with an indelible loathing despite modern attempts to turn it into a pleasant attraction. The communist presidents were in mausoleums there for some years - and one of them was on display having been (rather poorly) preserved after death - but they have now been interred elsewhere. There is reference to the place having been "forgotten" after the 50s. Hard to "forget" a massive hill and monument that towers above a whole region of Prague - we're guessing that "forgot" is a euphemism for something much more sinister. Googled it heavily but couldn't get to the bottom of the mystery.

Really, really interesting place to visit though. Of all the things I visited in Prague, by far the most interesting.
Written 12 September 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alexas C
Prague, Czech Republic9 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2014 • Friends
We are two american girls living in Prague. During our stay we decided to go to each location that is under the National Museums network and give our honest and raw reviews of our experience. Our first venture was to Vitkov National Memorial which is a very historically significant location in Czech history, dating back to the 14th century. It was rather fascinating for us, as we had heard some backstory before arriving there, and even took a virtual tour that the National Museum put together (off of their Vitkov National Memorial page: http://www.nm.cz/Hlavni-strana/Visit-Us/National-Memorial-on-the-Vitkov-Hill.html).

Through that comprehensive online tour, walking around the memorial felt rather familiar, yet still intriguing as a visitor. In addition to being able to view the mausoleum of Klement Gottwald (Communist leader and ex-president of Czechoslovakia), and a HUGE statue honoring war hero Jan Zizka of Trocnov on horseback, the National Museum also curated a concise and informational exhibit, the Crossroads of Czech and Czechoslovak Statehoods. Walking through the exhibit, visitors are able to experience and witness the recent events that precluded the modern-day Czech Republic through viewing artifacts from key time periods on the past century as collected and organized in an interactive fashion.There is also a temporary exhibit of Music and Politics, that highlights the power of music during war and revolution.
In addition to the humbling and informative exhibit, the ambiance of Vitkov National Memorial is absolutely breath-taking. The memorial sits on the hill that looks over all of Prague, allowing for stunning views of the city.
After visiting the exhibition, we were pleasantly surprised that there is a rooftop cafe. We enjoyed an even grander view of Prague from the terrace over good coffee, it seemed unbeatable. Concluding our trip, we exited through the park that surrounds the Vitkov National Memorial. While walking through the park, we were surrounded by lush trees and green grass with incredible views of prague peaking through the trees. Overall, we believe Vitkov National Memorial is a must see for all Prague visitors. For more information about the memorial visit the Vitkov page on the National Museums website. To read about our other adventures while living in Prague or if you would like to contact us please follow our blog- http://praguetravelers.wordpress.com/ :)
Written 1 July 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Tony C
Esher, UK236 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2014 • Couples
I had read something about this monument before I visited, but it didn't prepare me for the massive scale of the place.
The walk up[ the steep hill from the Army museum gets you to a viewpoint that presumably existed before the massive structure behind it was built. You walk up some steps onto a concrete parade ground with the largest statue of a man on a horse I have ever seen. Looking behind him, and round to the right, there are some large doors. The first one is to the tomb of the Unknown Soldier (free entry, no English info). Next is the entry to the main part of the museum, where you get tickets to the various parts. Go to the top viewing platform first (via a second elevator, through the Great hall, to get the best views of Prague from this angle. A perfect view of the TV tower to the left, and see how many soccer stadiums you can count! Great for trainspotters, too, as you are above one of the main lines coming into Prague.

Waking back down, you come back through the Hall (again, nothing in English, but impressive in scale), past the President's Room and can then visit the pleasant cafe for beer, coffee and cake before travelling further down and visiting the main exhibition (plenty in English) which documents the history of the Czech Republic in the 20th century. Most of the displays are easy to understand, and you quickly begin to realize how difficult it was for the nation to exist. For me, a moving experience, helping me to appreciate how lucky we British are to have never been subject to invasion in recent years.

Finally, the bizarre experience of the underground mausoleum and cryogenic chamber, where the original controls which attempted to maintain the bodies of the Party dignitaries who were displayed here are still intact. Like walking onto a 1950's sci-fi/horror set, complete with mortuary table with white shroud.

Certainly an interesting half day's experience. One stat we saw said that in it's height, in the 50s, 300,000 a year came to visit it. Now, I'd guess it's about a tenth of that. Pity, as it is both educational and affords great views over the city and surrounding areas..
Written 21 January 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Fedir
Stockholm, Sweden110 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2013 • Solo
Vitkov National Monument is located at the top of a steep hill and you certainly get a great view from there, but the surrounding park is well worth checking out as well.

You can avoid the steep climb up the hill by taking the number 9 tram from the city centre towards Spojovaci and getting off at Biskupcova tram stop. From there you can walk through the length of Park Vitkov towards the monument whilst taking in the views over Žižkov without the need to walk uphill. If you decide to take this route, you can also enjoy a cheap beer in the beer garden (popular with the locals) as you enter the park. Highly recommended if you are a traveller who would like to discover Prague like a local!
Written 1 September 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ronald p
County Londonderry, UK400 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2021
Yes I had a good look at this statue mainly due to my interest in horses but very impressive none the less.
Written 16 November 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Honest Reviewer
Penkridge, UK178 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020 • Couples
It has a great history behind it and gives great views of Prague. It’s a steep walk up so prepare yourself.
Written 13 February 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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