Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum)

Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum), Brno: Address, Phone Number, Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum) Reviews: 4.5/5

Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum)

Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum)
4.5
What people are saying
Master Jonjon
By Master Jonjon
A Palace
Dec 2018
W̐̈HEN T̐̈HE B̐̈RITISH M̐̈USEUM gets its hands on heritage sites or perhaps exhibition halls and venue spaces across Britain, these new acquisitions won’t be called ‘British Museum’. Right? For what we know is, the museum sits comfortably, on Great Russell Street, and while all these others sites might have recently changed their masters and joined the organization but nonetheless are not really ‘the original thing’ we see in Bloomsbury. Now screw that logic. For what is linguistics if not conceptually relative from coding to coding? It turns out, here, ‘Moravian Museum’ can manifest in a number of sites, all carrying the same sign and hence branded as one. You’ll find yourself mystified by a language/corporate idiosyncrasy of some sort that applies to ‘Moravian Gallery’ and ‘Brno City Museum’ as well. They are each all in one and one for all. And this is the ‘Dietrichstein Palace’ site, which incidentally, is most suitably to be really called t̼h̼e̼ Moravian Museum as it goes through Moravia’s geology and prehistory all the way up to the 20th century. And curiously, it is also a museum of three systems: each floor operates its own curation logic. The first floor is on geology. Lots and lots of stones in precise. And if you look carefully under each window, you’ll occasionally find there to be brief English leaflets – a piece of A4 paper going through all major types of stones and hence giving you a glimpse of what’s on, a joyous Christmas indeed if this is the syllabus of a uni course. The second floor – prehistory and history – takes no initiative to offer ‘international visitors’ any support. Everything is in Czech only, while you can play educated guesses with Indian numbers (years) and also words like ‘Neolit’, ‘Bronzova’. (While on the subject – is it really necessary to ticket check on every floor?) The third floor is the most developed part of the palace. It introduces 20th century history, with bilingual boards going through the Habsburg monarchy, Germanization, Czechoslovakia, Nazism and Socialist Republic. It is also on this floor that’s packed with student tours. You’ll be pretty alone as a lone wolf visitor. (You get tickets here at the box office for the Mandelianum and Bishop’s Courtyard (both a one-minute walk from D Palace). Buy them here to save you the embarrassment to get there only to be told to come here, again, possibly, in Czech.) ~master jonjon

Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
The area
Address

4.5
19 reviews
Excellent
12
Very good
5
Average
2
Poor
0
Terrible
0

UGM_BRNO
Brno, Czech Republic3,094 contributions
Museum is the home of beauty and history
May 2019 • Friends
Are you interested in history of the Czech Republic, mainly in history of the Moravian region? - If your answer is yes, then hurry up to the main building of the Moravian museum,i.e. the Dietrichstein Palace, and enjoy the exposition celebrating the century of the Czech Republic. If you are a fan of mineralogy and geology, then go to the exposition focusing on the stones and rocks including precious stones and meteorites too. If you prefer to listen to the stories of great man, then go and be inspired exploring the cabinet of Karel Absolon, the grandson of Jindrich Wankel, the father of Moravian archeology. Another great story to be listened inside the Mendelianum - part of the Bishop´s courtyard - next to the main building of the museum. Music of Leos Janacek to be celebrated inside the Janacek Memorial - one of my favourite places where to go during the Museum night in Brno. Of course do not miss the Anthropos - the unique exhibition allowing you to study the oldest history of "Moravian Hunters and Gatherers". Have a good time exploring the second largest and second oldest museum of the Czech Republic. During the official state days (bank holidays) in the Czech Republic the admission is free of charge. Do not miss the Museum night in May, there is only a symbolic fee to enter, have fun!
Written 26 May 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Master Jonjon
London, UK274 contributions
A Palace
Dec 2018 • Solo
W̐̈HEN T̐̈HE B̐̈RITISH M̐̈USEUM gets its hands on heritage sites or perhaps exhibition halls and venue spaces across Britain, these new acquisitions won’t be called ‘British Museum’. Right? For what we know is, the museum sits comfortably, on Great Russell Street, and while all these others sites might have recently changed their masters and joined the organization but nonetheless are not really ‘the original thing’ we see in Bloomsbury.

Now screw that logic.

For what is linguistics if not conceptually relative from coding to coding? It turns out, here, ‘Moravian Museum’ can manifest in a number of sites, all carrying the same sign and hence branded as one. You’ll find yourself mystified by a language/corporate idiosyncrasy of some sort that applies to ‘Moravian Gallery’ and ‘Brno City Museum’ as well. They are each all in one and one for all.

And this is the ‘Dietrichstein Palace’ site, which incidentally, is most suitably to be really called t̼h̼e̼ Moravian Museum as it goes through Moravia’s geology and prehistory all the way up to the 20th century. And curiously, it is also a museum of three systems: each floor operates its own curation logic.

The first floor is on geology. Lots and lots of stones in precise. And if you look carefully under each window, you’ll occasionally find there to be brief English leaflets – a piece of A4 paper going through all major types of stones and hence giving you a glimpse of what’s on, a joyous Christmas indeed if this is the syllabus of a uni course.

The second floor – prehistory and history – takes no initiative to offer ‘international visitors’ any support. Everything is in Czech only, while you can play educated guesses with Indian numbers (years) and also words like ‘Neolit’, ‘Bronzova’.

(While on the subject – is it really necessary to ticket check on every floor?)

The third floor is the most developed part of the palace. It introduces 20th century history, with bilingual boards going through the Habsburg monarchy, Germanization, Czechoslovakia, Nazism and Socialist Republic. It is also on this floor that’s packed with student tours. You’ll be pretty alone as a lone wolf visitor.

(You get tickets here at the box office for the Mandelianum and Bishop’s Courtyard (both a one-minute walk from D Palace). Buy them here to save you the embarrassment to get there only to be told to come here, again, possibly, in Czech.)

~master jonjon
Written 9 February 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

George
Nicosia, Cyprus1,929 contributions
Moravian Museum
Apr 2018 • Friends
It is the 2nd largest and 2nd oldest museum in the Czech Republic that lies in the heart of the square of the old town
Written 25 April 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

GneissGirl
Montreal, Canada143 contributions
Well explained geology and archaeology, in Czech
Jun 2017
This museum concentrates on the pre-history and geology of the Czech Republic, especially Moravia.Take a Czech speaker with you, all the exhibits are in Czech! The exhibits are excellently done, with a good depth of explanation
Written 26 June 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Faisal_Al_Kooheji
Riffa, Bahrain30 contributions
No English explanation
Dec 2016 • Couples
It is a nice museum but unfortunately exhibitions have no English explanation at all. In such a tourist attraction English language is a necessity as it is the international language for most foreign tourists. Unfortunately we suffered understanding about the story and history behind the exhibitions.
Written 6 January 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

IainShsron
45 contributions
Really Good Museum
Jul 2016 • Couples
It may not be flash and modern, but this place is LOADED, from vast amounts of excavation finds, walls and walls of rocks and minerals to sliced polished meteorites.

Fossils and STUFF lots of STUFF.

And a very, very nice selection in the blink and you miss it shop.
Written 23 July 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

DBDDorset
New Forest, UK195 contributions
Excellent exhibits and helpful guides
Feb 2016
The exhibition was well laid out and contained different exhibits of pre history and Roman times. All the exhibits has only Czech language details, as I was with a Czech speaker who could tell me about the exhibits is was fine, Had I been alone or without a Czech speaker it would be less enjoyable and informative.
Written 14 February 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

UGM_BRNO
Brno, Czech Republic3,094 contributions
One of the largest Baroque palaces in Brno
May 2015 • Friends
The Dietrichstein Palace constructed in the 17th century used to serve as the residence of cardinal František Dietrichstein. Since 1911 it has been housing exhibitions and after a vast renovation the 1980s the building attracts the highest amount of visitors comparing facilities of the Moravian Museum. I am a patriot so my favourite permanent exhibitions are: “Prehistory of Moravia”, “Great Moravia” and “Moravia in Middle Ages”. I am also a big fan of Karel Absolon Memorial – the cabinet presenting work of the great man, who was an entomologist, archeologist and speleologist whose name still echoes in the Moravian Karst.
Written 25 July 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Krystinka
Urbana, IL113 contributions
Check out the Mendelianum
Mar 2015 • Business
Was present for the scientific opening of the Mendelianum in Brno. This is the new major section of the Moravian Museum. It interprets the work of Gregor Mendel with regard to the culture and political milieu of Brno/central Moravia. It includes excellent hands-on activities for school children and rare artifacts for scholars. It is well worth a stop for Brno visitors, with easy access from the train station and central town.
Written 8 July 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.
Anything missing or inaccurate?
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Frequently Asked Questions about Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum)

Hotels near Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum): View all hotels near Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum) on Tripadvisor

Restaurants near Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum): View all restaurants near Moravian Museum (Moravske Zemske Muzeum) on Tripadvisor