Museo Benito Quinquela Martin

Museo Benito Quinquela Martin

Museo Benito Quinquela Martin
4.5
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday
11:15 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday
11:15 AM - 6:00 PM
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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: La Boca
A neighbourhood defined by its immigrant roots, La Boca still maintains this past alive in its streets today. Due to its proximity to the river, the neighbourhood became the preferred settling area for immigrants of a wide variety of origins, who ended up living together in the conventillos. Thus, these houses became a melting pot of different cultures and traditions that birthed creations like tango and lunfardo. Nowadays, this legacy can be seen and felt on Caminito Street, which welcomes visitors with colourful facades, cobblestones, and street artists showcasing their skills. Just like its neighbor San Telmo, La Boca is one of the prime destinations to experience the traditions and customs that originated from the city’s immigrant past and which have shaped its distinct identity.
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles215 reviews
Excellent
114
Very good
85
Average
12
Poor
3
Terrible
1

sandy c
Copenhagen, Denmark660 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019
Yes, unless you are a serious art enthusiast, you are going to wonder what the big deal is. There wasn't a lot of art to see, and what was there was not exactly mind blowing. I did like the selection of ships prows. The views over la Boca were nice too. I was expecting a patio or rooftop to be open, but nothing was. To be fair though, there are changing exhibitions and some may be better than others. If you happen to be in the area and want to take a chance, it's cheap enough so no biggy if you don't like it. But I wouldn't come all the way to the neighbouthood just for this.
Written 21 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

toniShanghai
shanghai678 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
This is why we went down to La Boca and we were not disappointed. Martin's work is in itself excellent but they also have a great exhibition of other artists. This is one of the better and most interesting art places in BA
Written 23 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ahmad_Ardalan
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates422 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2017 • Solo
If you are visiting La Boca, I would advise you to visit this small museum as it belongs to one of the most important artists from that area.
For 40 pesos, you would enjoy the lovely paintings as well as the personal belongings of the great Quinquela Martin, who donated all his work and home to his neighborhood.
I highly recommend this place, there is more to La Boca than the touristic street and La Bombonera.

8.5/10
Written 11 April 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Deborah4967
Philadelphia87 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
You will need to look hard to find this museum, as it is inside a school building. Admission is 10 pesos and there is a nice little book shop. The secret is that the artist Benito Quinquino Martin grew up an orphan in La Boca and painted the waterfront scenes. In the 1950s he donated the land for this museum, along with his works and collection, as well as sponsoring the development of the neighborhood of Caminito, where he was adopted and grew up, as a tourist attraction. If you are tired of souvenir shops, this is a revelation and makes the trip to La Boca worthwhile.
Written 4 January 2008
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Anne Mette E
275 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2017 • Friends
My friend and I had spend the day in La Boca and decided to visit this museum as well. It's a nice little museum that you should visit, when in La Boca.
Written 23 February 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

medi470
Buenos Aires, Argentina204 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2015 • Friends
The Barrio of “La Boca” in Buenos Aires is quite famous. You probably know a lot about it and may have already visited it. However, I would like to invite you today to visit a unique but not well known museum in that Barrio. It is called “Museo Benito QuinQuela Martin” in honour of one of Argentina’s most famous contemporary painters. But before you go, let me tell you a bit about the artist and his museum.
In the barrio of “La Boca”, a long time ago, there lived a little orphan boy; Benito was his name. He was adopted by Manuel Chinchella and Justina Molina de Chinchella who worked in a coal yard. Benito was born in 1890, and was adopted when he was seven and assumed his adopted father name, later modified to “QuinQuela”. He grew up to be one of the most famous Argentine painters; Benito QuinQuela Martin.
Quinquela learned to paint at a small night school in La Boca while working during the day on the family’s coal yard. At 17 he joined the “Pezzini Stiatessi” institute in La Boca. By 1910 he began exhibiting his work in small galleries in and around La Boca. Ten years later he had exhibited in different places in Argentina and in Brasil. The Argentine president Marcelo de Alvear liked his work and encouraged him to visit and exhibit in Europe. He sent him in 1922 as Chancellor at the Argentine Consulate in Madrid where he exhibited his work. In 1925 he exhibited in Paris and in 1927 in New York City; in all three cities he sold some of his work to museums and private collectors. In 1929 he exhibited in Rome where Mussolini chose a few of his paintings for the Rome museum of modern art and finally in 1930 he exhibited in London and sold pieces to several British museums including the museum of Art of London. He was by then an established artist worldwide, although some critics did not like his work.
Upon his return to Argentina, he continued to paint and evolved as a philanthropist. He donated several of his paintings to La Boca and to the City of Buenos Aires. He also bought land and donated money to build a children school, a hospital and a kindergarten. In 1933 he donated the land and the money to build an arts school for young children “Escuela Pedro de Mendoza” and, in the same building, a museum as well as a place for him to live and work. The school opened in 1936 and two years later the museum “El Museo de Artistas Argentinos” exhibiting Argentinean art work of the nineteenth century to the present time was also inaugurated. The name of the museum was later changed to “Museo de Bellas Artes de la Boca; Benito Quinquela Martín”.
Today the school “Escuela Pedro Mendoza” occupies the ground and first floors. The school rooms are decorated by 18 murals that QuinQuela did himself.
The museum is on the second floor and houses the works of contemporary Argentine painters. It is divided into three rooms. As you enter, you first go through the Alfredo Lazzari room that contains a permanent collection of Argentine painters from the late nineteenth to the mid twentieth Century. In that room there are some beautiful paintings from the early twentieth century. Among the ones I like best are “Bassani’s, Despues De La Lluvia” and “Sivori’s, La Muerte Del Marino”.
The Americo Bonetti room is to your right by the windows [if you have a chance look at the port through these windows]. In that room you will find an extensive collection of Bow figureheads that Quinquela collected. [This exhibit reminds me of Pablo Neruda’s house museum in Isla Negra, Chile where the Chilean poet also had a substantial collection of ship bow figure heads].
On your left at the end of the first room, is the Miguel Carlos Victorica and Eduardo Sivori room which holds temporary exhibitions of renowned contemporary Argentinean artists.
On the third floor, the living quarters of Quinquela and his studio have been converted into a fascinating exhibition. Some of his important paintings are displayed that cover the three themes he was most fond of; the port and work on the docks, Fire that consumed several ships over the years and the ships’ grave yards in the port. Among these, is one of his most famous pictures, “Crepúsculo En El Astillero” [Twilight in the ship yard] [1]. There is also a small room with pictures from his life, including a couple with Geraldine Chaplin [when she visited to receive the QuinQuela’s “Orden Del Tornillo” [order of the screw] [2] awarded to her father Charlie Chaplin. I spent quite a bit of time admiring this small room and his apartment.
In addition terraces were opened in 1966 to house a good collection of sculptures, by several argentine artists, dating from the late nineteenth to the mid twentieth century. Unfortunately they were temporarily closed last time I was there; hopefully they will be open when you go.
On the third floor, the famous artist and philanthropist lived and worked until his death in 1977 at the age of 87.
The museum is on Avenida Pedro De Mendoza, 1835 in La Boca. If you go, plan on spending 1-2 hours in the museum. Also make sure you have enough time to stroll around this area of La Boca and perhaps have a lunch at one of the restaurants. However, the place is usually crowded, lively and very touristy. If you prefer to eat somewhere more quite, with a good view of the port, you may want to try the terrace of the restaurant of the “Proa Museum”, a couple of blocks down from the QuinQuela museum, on Avenida Pedro De Mendoza. That museum is also worth visiting [I will report on it in a future review].
[1] QuinQuela’s other two most famous paintings are “Tormenta en el Astillero” [Museum of Luxembourg, Paris] and “Puente de la Boca” [St. James's Palace, London].
[2] In 1947, QuinQuela founded the “Orden Del Tornello” to be awarded to special people. These people, he believed, are so talented, so creative and served humanity expecting nothing in return, that they must have a missing screw in their heads. He proposed to award them, in an elaborate party, a screw as a trophy, the one they are missing. Several Argentinean figures were awarded this honour including Luis César Amadori, Tita Merrello among others. In 1966 he awarded the trophy to Charlie Chaplin which his daughter received in his name. It is not clear to me how popular this award was, given the mixed reviews about it.
Written 23 April 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

nivramkoorb
San Francisco, CA86 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2010
We spent 6 months in South America and 15 weeks in Buenos Aires. A truly wonderful city and part of what made it great were the abundance of museums which were either free or very inexpensive. One of the best was the Museo de Bellas Artes. It had a diverse collection of art but its' best feature was the robust amount of South American art from the last 2 centuries. The one negative was that the building could use a sprucing up. During my time in the city I visited the museum 5 or 6 times and truly enjoyed it.
Written 17 September 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

PBPG
Yorkshire, UK6,554 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2022
What a great area. So much to see and to take in. It is surrounded by some very dodgy areas, our guide said never go alone!
Written 24 December 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Elena P
Guadalajara, Mexico4,970 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019 • Couples
The museum is nice and the terrace can give you an idea about the contrast between the touristic part and the real part of La Boca. 100 pesos we were asked for the entrace, but it was not written anywhere
Written 29 December 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

panchotraveler
Santiago, Chile131 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019 • Family
Great place with small but very interesting art collection plus the house of Quinquela Martin, a great Argentinean painter. To tell you the truth it is the only place worth visiting in this area.
Written 30 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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MUSEO BENITO QUINQUELA MARTIN (2024) All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

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