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23701 Mohave Road, Poston, AZ 85371
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everythingmustgo2018 wrote a review Jul 2019
Crescent City, California95 contributions34 helpful votes
It's so important that Poston preserves this history so -- thank you, Poston! I visited the memorial and didn't know that you could visit the camp too. There's no signage indicating that at the memorial so if you want to go deeper, do some research ahead of time. The monument is small but well designed. You can spend as little as five minutes, or longer if you'd like to contemplate America's racist past and how far we still must come.
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Date of experience: April 2019
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Eldred V wrote a review Jun 2019
Fountain Hills, Arizona39 contributions12 helpful votes
The Memorial Monument in Poston, AZ is a stark reminder of a sad time in United States history. There are plaques around the memorial explaining the history of the camp and internment of nearly 18,000 Japanese American citizens during World War II. There is no visitor center at the monument. There were no signs for the actual camp but what remains is located a short distance west of the highway - look for a group of palm trees. Unfortunately, we have done a very poor job of preserving this part of our history and the crumbling buildings are surrounded by a chain link fence. Definitely worth a visit and a great history lesson - our daughter and grandsons were not aware that such an event had ever taken place in this country.
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Date of experience: June 2019
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Merril H wrote a review Jun 2019
27 contributions9 helpful votes
+1
I approached Camp Poston 1 from I-10, taking the Ehrenberg exit. There is a sign directing you over the overpass to Poston “Road”, but you are really taking Ehrenberg Road in an easterly direction until it turns north towards Parker. You will encounter signage about a mile on showing you are entering the Colorado River Indian Tribal Nation. There are currently no road signs from that point on guiding you to the Poston Camp area. Both sides of the main road to the camp are mainly farms owned by tribal members and you should not trespass or wander off the highway without permission. After about 20 miles I found the Poston Memorial pillar. There were photos on the plaques around the memorial explaining the history of the camp and internment but they are now burned off from the desert heat. When I visited it was 110F so bring a hat and sunscreen. There is no indoor museum or visitor center, and there are no signs directing you to the actual Camp. I located the Camp by driving to Woodys II convenience store just north of the Memorial. The tribal staff inside were all very friendly and sell a large variety of cold drinks, snacks and novelty ice creams that are very welcome on a hot day! They will direct you to a road across the highway that leads at a westward angle toward Poston Camp 1. You will be driving in the direction of the Colorado River, passing a farm worker community on the left and arriving at the Poston site a quarter mile from the main road. Access to Poston Camps II and III does not seem to be available. However it appears that many of the buildings in the Camps were salvaged from the internment camps at some point and repurposed for tribal and farm worker homes. I turned in on one of the palm-lined roads and just parked. There are hardly any visitors so you will have time to see everything at your convenience. There is no interpretive signage anywhere, only No Trespassing signs on the fences that now surround most of the old Camp school and administrative buildings. There are a number of old staff homes and concrete foundations that lie outside of the fencing that you can walk around. Many of these heavily vandalized staff homes were modified during the decades after the Camp closed for farm workers. However you can still see some remnants of the original camp in the form of broken ceramic plates littering the ground. Health care was notoriously poor in the camps and yet there was great need for adequate care due to the poor diet and living conditions for internees. It does help to view some of the videos uploaded on You Tube from previous visitors to Poston. They do a good job of orienting folks to Camp 1 and its layout. However most of the videos were apparently taken before the fencing went up, which now forces you to look through chain links at the adobe school buildings and one tar paper barrack (courtesy of Del Webb builders, circa 1942). These buildings, which subsequently were used as local tribal schools for many years, are being slowly restored. There is a website devoted to the volunteers working on these Poston projects. About ten miles north on the main road towards Parker, at the CRIT Administrative headquarters, there is a tribal library and a museum that reportedly have material about the Poston internment camps. However the hours it is open are limited and it was not open when we visited on Sunday. The Poston Complex held about 18,000 Japanese Americans at one point, which would have made it the 3rd largest city in AZ at the time. Camp 1 housed mostly Japanese Americans from Riverside-San Bernardino counties, Camp III was mostly comprised of Japanese Americans from San Diego. The Poston camp complex is a very important reminder of the hysterical attitudes that can form during national crises, as well as a reminder of the suffering that Japanese Americans unjustly endured for years in such hostile environments as Poston and Gila River.
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Date of experience: June 2019
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Annette J wrote a review Feb 2019
Neenah, Wisconsin16 contributions4 helpful votes
We took a tour with the Quartzsite Historical Society(located at the Museum in Quartzsite AZ). Very knowledgable tour guide. Great history lesson. We all drove in our own vehicles and caravanned and stopped at other interesting historical spots along the way. After spending time at the memorial just down the road is ruins from a part of the camp that you can freely drive down and contemplate what happened there.
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Date of experience: January 2019
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MoonLite G wrote a review Apr 2018
8 contributions
+1
Im a teenager in high school learning about WWII and this was a fascinating trip and I’m honored to be able to visit this. I love how it is surrounded by palm trees and i think it is a great memorial site for people of all ages to go and see.
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Date of experience: April 2018
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