Rano Raraku
Ancient RuinsPoints of Interest & LandmarksVolcanoes
Monday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Tuesday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Wednesday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Friday
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
About
The island's famous moai statues were carved from the volcanic rock of this mountain and are scattered across its slopes in various stages of completion.
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  • Ali921
    Edinburgh, United Kingdom1,475 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Birthplace of Moai
    You can only visit with a guide and only visit once. Walk among giants in the legendary moai statue quarry Rano Raraku. This volcano that was turned into a factory invokes a sense of mystery in an almost surreal way, stronger than any other place at Easter Island. This is the heart of ancient Rapa Nui civilization with hundreds of abandoned moais scattered around. Moai statues were carved here, before being transported to all other corners of the island. Here we see many demonstrations of the incredible skills in statue carving that was reached in the ancient Easter Island society, since we here have the largest and most refined statues of the whole island.
    Visited January 2024
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 30 January 2024
  • Ron S
    New York City, New York5,712 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Rano Raraku
    Rano Raraku and Rapa Nui National Park are one and the same. You have to buy the tickets online for $90 which covers all sites on the island although Rano Raraku can be visited only once. In addition, you must be accompanied by a local, preferably a guide, which is a rip-off but since you came here to see the moai you have no choice but pay.
    Visited May 2024
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 8 May 2024
  • midway42
    Georgia3,375 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Visiting Rapa Nui's Labor and Delivery Unit.
    Egypt has the pyramids, India has the Taj Mahal, and Rapa Nui has the mo’ai statues. While the latter are probably not as well-known, they are within a measurable distance of that fame. Carved by indigenous islanders between ca. 1250 and 1500, the statues represent a minimalist style of art, widely regarded as being created in homage to ancestors that have recently died. There are almost 1,000 of these stone carvings found on Rapa Nui in various states of preservation and completion, with maybe a dozen scattered throughout the world in places such as London, Paris, Washington D.C., and New Zealand. The vast majority of mo’ai were created at Rano Raraku, a volcanic crater with an abundant amount of ash found on the eastern side of Rapa Nui. I visited with a guide in the middle of the first day of my formal tour on the island. After checking in at the front office, our first stop was at a table containing different types of stone used on the island including tuff, basalt, and scoria. The remainder of the visit consists of a following a trail in a vaguely circular loop. Along the 1,500+ meter path are maybe a dozen interpretive points which include statues in various states of completion and preservation. Included in this list are the only kneeling mo’ai (Tukuturi) and the largest mo’ai (69 feet high, 200+ tons). There are a few lookout stations where we paused to discuss certain topics and appreciate views of the countryside, including remnants of a path used to distribute the finished products to other parts of the island. Total time on site was about 90 minutes. In summary, along with Orongo (see separate review) this attraction was the highlight of my four days on the island. The main reason for this is the somewhat eerie, apocalyptic atmosphere that pervaded the entire experience. For some unknown reason the era of statue carving came to a sudden end on the island in the 1500’s but instead of a gradual decline it seems to have suddenly halted as if by executive order. Secondly, my visit here made me realize the sheer time and effort it took to create these objects especially in the pre-industrial era. One can read as many numerical statistics as you want but nothing compares to viewing the area in person. A visit here is absolutely essential even if your time on the island is a brief.
    Visited May 2024
    Travelled solo
    Written 4 June 2024
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midway42
Georgia3,375 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Solo
Egypt has the pyramids, India has the Taj Mahal, and Rapa Nui has the mo’ai statues. While the latter are probably not as well-known, they are within a measurable distance of that fame. Carved by indigenous islanders between ca. 1250 and 1500, the statues represent a minimalist style of art, widely regarded as being created in homage to ancestors that have recently died. There are almost 1,000 of these stone carvings found on Rapa Nui in various states of preservation and completion, with maybe a dozen scattered throughout the world in places such as London, Paris, Washington D.C., and New Zealand. The vast majority of mo’ai were created at Rano Raraku, a volcanic crater with an abundant amount of ash found on the eastern side of Rapa Nui.

I visited with a guide in the middle of the first day of my formal tour on the island. After checking in at the front office, our first stop was at a table containing different types of stone used on the island including tuff, basalt, and scoria. The remainder of the visit consists of a following a trail in a vaguely circular loop. Along the 1,500+ meter path are maybe a dozen interpretive points which include statues in various states of completion and preservation. Included in this list are the only kneeling mo’ai (Tukuturi) and the largest mo’ai (69 feet high, 200+ tons). There are a few lookout stations where we paused to discuss certain topics and appreciate views of the countryside, including remnants of a path used to distribute the finished products to other parts of the island. Total time on site was about 90 minutes.

In summary, along with Orongo (see separate review) this attraction was the highlight of my four days on the island. The main reason for this is the somewhat eerie, apocalyptic atmosphere that pervaded the entire experience. For some unknown reason the era of statue carving came to a sudden end on the island in the 1500’s but instead of a gradual decline it seems to have suddenly halted as if by executive order. Secondly, my visit here made me realize the sheer time and effort it took to create these objects especially in the pre-industrial era. One can read as many numerical statistics as you want but nothing compares to viewing the area in person. A visit here is absolutely essential even if your time on the island is a brief.
Written 4 June 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ron S
New York City, NY5,712 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Couples
Rano Raraku and Rapa Nui National Park are one and the same. You have to buy the tickets online for $90 which covers all sites on the island although Rano Raraku can be visited only once. In addition, you must be accompanied by a local, preferably a guide, which is a rip-off but since you came here to see the moai you have no choice but pay.
Written 8 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TAMAN1951
Liberty Lake, WA8,216 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2024 • Couples
One of the most interesting sites.

A number of Moai statues spread around in a number of different styles. Also present are a few in the process of being quarried.

Great vistas but quite a hike.
Written 2 April 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rohit K
50 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2024 • Couples
The quarry for the all the island’s moais is an astonishing place. It gives a real sense of what it took to carve and transport these gigantic monoliths. Not to be missed.
Written 9 March 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Nigel
Greater London, UK29 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2024 • Solo
Well worth seeing, it’s basically the Quarry they all came from
There are many finished Moai and some that broke along the way plus some you can see in the hillside that were not finished
Written 15 February 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ali921
Edinburgh, UK1,475 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2024 • Couples
You can only visit with a guide and only visit once. Walk among giants in the legendary moai statue quarry Rano Raraku. This volcano that was turned into a factory invokes a sense of mystery in an almost surreal way, stronger than any other place at Easter Island. This is the heart of ancient Rapa Nui civilization with hundreds of abandoned moais scattered around. Moai statues were carved here, before being transported to all other corners of the island. Here we see many demonstrations of the incredible skills in statue carving that was reached in the ancient Easter Island society, since we here have the largest and most refined statues of the whole island.
Written 30 January 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Baldeagle
San Diego, CA35 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Couples
This quarry gives you an exceptional view of the process for carving the Moai from the rock. There are many Moai to view including some that are still in the quarry and haven’t been released, some that were released from the quarry rock and may have been placed in an upright position to finish, and some that were finished but appeared to have broken as they were being moved to their destination on the island.
Written 24 October 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Robert D
Brooklyn, New York4,185 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2023 • Solo
If you only visit one sight on Rapa Nui, this is the one to visit. This is the quarry where the Moai were made. You can see various Moai, including some that got damaged on the way to the Ahu. See different styles of Moai and just be amazed. An absolute must-see.
Written 17 May 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

A. M.
Virginia Beach, VA431 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2023 • Friends
My favorite of all the things we did while on Easter Island was the visit to this famous quarry. A public space where anyone on the island could come and carve their moai from the stone found here.

There are literally dozens (maybe hundreds) of these Moai in various modes of completion scattered around. You can get up close and personal with some of them and really see the detail in ways you wouldn't realize.

It's beautiful and there are paths that wind around up a lazy hillside and show you a view of the Pacific Ocean from the top with a slight breeze blowing.

So beautiful.
Written 11 May 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

JnVSydney
Greater Sydney, Australia20,935 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2023 • Couples
The first stop of our tour was one of the three volcanic craters on the island and probably the most important stop (attraction) of all, the quarry where the Moai were hewn by hand from the granite before being imbued with spirits and transferred to their Ahu or platforms elsewhere on the island. Rano Raraku is the only volcanic cone tuff quarry on the island so, if you like, the birthplace of every, single Moai that exists on the planet. Including Dum Dum - or the Moai who inspired the character in the movie ‘Night at the Museum’ with Ben Stiller. This place was an awesome start to the day, to walk amongst the Moai, was amazing
Written 5 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Rano Raraku, Easter Island

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