Samurai Houses
Samurai Houses
4
Points of Interest & LandmarksHistoric Walking Areas
What people are saying
Shannon Lefebvre
By Shannon Lefebvre
Samurai Street
4.0 of 5 bubblesJan 2019
The Samurai Street in Shimabara commemorates the old samurai residences on the Shimabara Peninsular. This famous street is lined with stone walls and a spring water canal running down its center. Three samurai houses have been restored and opened as exhibits to the public to restore the image and the traditions of this old Samurai town. It is an extremely picturesque setting and perfect for a great photo shoot as images of feudal Japan came racing back into your consciousness from many of those movies and books you have read from your youth. There aren't too many places left in Japan where one can step back in time and literally feel what it was like to live in these exciting yet dangerous times in Japan where the Samurai yielded ultimate power and demanded total respect. The houses are basic and it is evident that living was quite antiquated and very traditional. The kitchen too was very rudimentary and of course a lot on ingenuity was needed to cook and prepare the food for the huge number of immediate family as well as extended family, guest and of course acquaintances that visited the house every now and then. The canal was used by all of the district and the water source was controlled and looked after communally. A great example of group dynamics where everyone within the community helped each other unlike today's society that is built on greed, destroying the natural resources around us and lacking compassion of our fellow man. Sometimes I think it wouldn't have been too bad to live in these feudal times especially when comparing to the issues that we face today. A must visit when in the area.

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles136 reviews
Excellent
33
Very good
70
Average
30
Poor
2
Terrible
1

Kimitaka S
Taichung, Taiwan
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2020 • Solo
Along a historical street, there are three Samurai houses which are open to public. Because each style is different (maybe because of the function of the owner), I recommend you to visit all three houses. Don’t rush and enjoy your visit!
Written 24 December 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Shannon Lefebvre
Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2019 • Friends
The Samurai Street in Shimabara commemorates the old samurai residences on the Shimabara Peninsular. This famous street is lined with stone walls and a spring water canal running down its center. Three samurai houses have been restored and opened as exhibits to the public to restore the image and the traditions of this old Samurai town. It is an extremely picturesque setting and perfect for a great photo shoot as images of feudal Japan came racing back into your consciousness from many of those movies and books you have read from your youth.

There aren't too many places left in Japan where one can step back in time and literally feel what it was like to live in these exciting yet dangerous times in Japan where the Samurai yielded ultimate power and demanded total respect. The houses are basic and it is evident that living was quite antiquated and very traditional. The kitchen too was very rudimentary and of course a lot on ingenuity was needed to cook and prepare the food for the huge number of immediate family as well as extended family, guest and of course acquaintances that visited the house every now and then.

The canal was used by all of the district and the water source was controlled and looked after communally. A great example of group dynamics where everyone within the community helped each other unlike today's society that is built on greed, destroying the natural resources around us and lacking compassion of our fellow man. Sometimes I think it wouldn't have been too bad to live in these feudal times especially when comparing to the issues that we face today.

A must visit when in the area.
Written 14 June 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

tomizuta1953
Funabashi, Japan
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
It is about a ten minutes' walk from the castle to the former samurai residence area. All of the higher ranking samurais’ residences have been lost and only those of the lower ranking samurais remain. The residence area stretches about three hundred meters, and there is a stream in the middle of the lane, which the samurais used for drinking water. It is a pretty and quiet area. Three samurai residences are open to the public for free. You can get a good understanding of typical samurai houses by browsing through the house and viewing the gardens. Description in English is also provided. One house belonged to the Shinozuka Family. Judging from the stipend they received and the position they were given as clerks and local administrators, it must have been tough for them if we think of the living style they had to maintain as samurais. Their residence and gardens are quite modest. Compared with the Shinozuka residence, the living standard of the Yamamoto Family who served as military professor for the Shimabara feudal domain was higher as can be seen from the size and state of their garden. There is a rest area with a gift shop nearby, where I took a rest. I noticed a shrine in the corner of the rest area grounds. The description told me that the shrine is dedicated to the water God. It originated in 1618 during the construction of Shimabara Castle by the Matsukura feudal lord. The construction was hindered by the many springs in the area for which the clan prayed for help of the water God.
Written 5 June 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2018 • Solo
A short walk from Shimabara station. These 3 houses are on a street that kept the historical feel. There is a good write up posted at each of the houses in English.
Written 26 October 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

eLoweeee
Singapore, Singapore
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Family
Samurai houses are very near Shimabara castle. We are allowed to enter the house and understand how the Samurai lives back then. Very cultural and beautiful place to take picture
Written 28 May 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2017 • Family
You get to see traditional samurai dwellings with 3 houses preserved.
The whole neighborhood used to be samurai residences.
Written 24 December 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ncjc2013
Rolling Hills Estates, CA
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2017 • Couples
Entry fee is free. There are 3 preserved houses you can view. All are very similar, you must take your shoes off before entering. You can imagine what the samurai life was like. Cherry blossoms were blooming in April. Interesting that down the middle of the dirt roads there was water flowing down the center.
Written 11 April 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SBF2
Houston, TX
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2017 • Couples
Nice way to see how the Samurai lived. Interesting well preserved homes. A few different types are presented.
Written 4 April 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2016 • Family
This is an area where the old samurai houses have been preserved and restored. There are 3 samurai houses put up for visitors, with exhibits geared towards lifestyles of these samurai homes. I found the mannequins displays creepy though, and after a while, they look kind of similar.

Tip 1: Combine Shimabara Castle, the carp streets and these samurai houses together on your itinerary. They're literally next to each other and since admission to the latter two are free, it's easy to walk away if its not to your liking.

Tip 2: Bring a bottle of water, an umbrella or a hat or shades if you're visiting on warm days. Until you get inside the samurai houses, the rest is unsheltered and it can get quite hot if you have the mid-day sun beating down on you.
Written 12 March 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Keizo
Kawasaki, Japan
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2016 • Solo
I think this place is much better than that in Chiran which is very famous.
Why? Free of charge vs charged. Longer straight road with water pass vs winding(there is a reason for it though)short one. Houses with miniature figures vs nothing in it
Written 27 December 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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