Tomb of Gervase Alard
Tomb of Gervase Alard
4.5
Points of Interest & LandmarksReligious SitesMonuments & Statues
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles4 reviews
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Geoff H
Cranbrook, UK12,187 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2020
It's not everyone that can have the heads of a king and a king's wife on his tomb but Gervase Alard does. The delicately carved arch of the recessed canopy springs from the heads of King Edward I and his second wife, Margaret. This very imposing tomb shows Gervase Alard, an Admiral of the Cinque Ports, who was born in Winchelsea and was Winchelsea's first Mayor, in full armour with raised hands and a lion crouching at his feet. It is well worth seeking out if you are in the church.
Written 29 September 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

johnhouston2
Knaresborough, UK5,229 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2020 • Couples
Whereas many tombs in churches and cathedrals are so dark that they appear forgotten, this one, and others in this beautiful and impressive church, are in superb condition and nicely lit. As well as making them much more appealing to the eye, this care and attention seems somehow more respectful.
Really well done.
Written 23 September 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

AlBee24
Reigate, UK133 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2020
All the tombs in this church have hidden secrets and make for a fascinating bit of detective work to find out their true meanings.
Written 18 September 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Geoff H
Cranbrook, UK12,187 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019
Born in Winchelsea, Gervase Alard (1270-1340) was appointed, by King Edward I, as an Admiral of the Cinque Ports; an administrative office which he held until 1303. In February 1303, he was appointed as Admiral of the Southern Fleets and Captain and Admiral of the Cinque Ports. In 1304, he ceded his command of the Cinque Ports fleet and was appointed as Admiral of the Irish Sea; a post he held until 1305. In 1306 he was appointed Admiral of the Western Fleet and was re-appointed Admiral of the Cinque Ports. He held both these offices simultaneously until 1314. Gervase Alard is known to be the first serving naval officer to be granted a commission to the rank of Admiral of an English Fleet and had the distinction of serving, from 1296 to 1340, under three kings, Kings Edward I, Edward II and Edward III. Gervase Alard died in 1340 and his imposing tomb is in The Parish Church of St Thomas the Martyr in his home town of Winchelsea; a town of which he was its first recorded mayor in 1294. His striking tomb was used, in 1854, by John Everett Millais, a founder member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, as a background for his painting "L'Enfant du Regiment". It is a pity that the beauty that Millais saw has been slighly marred by the addition of a pipe at the foot of the tomb.
Written 5 January 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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Tomb of Gervase Alard (2024) All You MUST Know Before You Go (with Photos)

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