Things to do in Hiraizumi-cho

Top Things to Do in Hiraizumi-cho, Japan - Hiraizumi-cho Must-See Attractions

Revenue and your browsing history impact the experiences featured on this page, learn more.

Things to Do in Hiraizumi-cho

Check out must-see sights and activities:
Chuson-ji Temple, Takkoku no Iwaya, Sacred & Religious Sites, Historic Sites.

Explore popular experiences

See what other travellers like to do, based on ratings and number of bookings.

Book these experiences for a closer look at the region.

Top Attractions in Hiraizumi-cho

These rankings are informed by Tripadvisor data—we consider traveller reviews, ratings, number of page views, and user location.
1

Learn more about this content
Tours, activities and experiences bookable on Tripadvisor, ranked using exclusive Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, popularity, user preferences, price, and bookings made through Tripadvisor.
We perform checks on reviews.
Tripadvisor’s approach to reviews
Before posting, each Tripadvisor review goes through an automated tracking system, which collects information, answering the following questions: how, what, where and when. If the system detects something that potentially contradicts our community guidelines, the review is not published.
When the system detects a problem, a review may be automatically rejected, sent to the reviewer for validation, or manually reviewed by our team of content specialists, who work 24/7 to maintain the quality of the reviews on our site.
Our team checks each review posted on the site disputed by our community as not meeting our community guidelines.
Learn more about our review moderation.

What travellers are saying

  • Zimminaroundtheworld
    Okinawa Prefecture, Japan1,957 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Chuson-ji is part of a UNESCO site and a must if you are near the area. We did a day trip here from Sendai and highly recommend visiting. It is somewhat remote, but I was surprised by how busy it was, there were a lot of tour buses. The temple grounds were expansive with multiple temples, a museum, shops, and cafes. The Golden Temple was impressive, well worth the fee. We visited during fall and the whole area was gorgeous. I bet it's beautiful at all times throughout the year, but the leaf colors were vibrant reds and yellows.
    Written 25 November 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Zimminaroundtheworld
    Okinawa Prefecture, Japan1,957 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I was in the area visiting Hiraizumi, a UNESCO site. This was my first stop among the other attractions and Takkoku no Iwaya was definitely a highlight. There is a parking lot across the street. There is an entrance fee. You can freely walk around and even inside the temple. I knew about this temple for a while and seeing it in person was amazing. It's just as beautiful in person as you see in the photos.
    Written 25 November 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Martina1888
    Inverness, UK507 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Much more peaceful than Chuson-ji although smaller. There's a temple building and you may even enter it. It's lovely to walk around the pond and relax. There are ruins from an old temple building and a small museum. It's maybe 10min from the train station by foot.
    Written 6 October 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • tomizuta1953
    Funabashi, Japan1,355 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    In early December 2023, I revisited Hiraizumi for the first time in over 40 years. One focus of my visit on this occasion was to reinforce my understanding of paradise gardens. As usual, I started my visit with a visit to local museums to gain some insight on the property I was going to reexplore. Hiraizumi Culture and History Museum was the first museum I visited. This turned out to be a very informative visit to refresh my understanding of Hiraizumi’s heritage. Although perhaps a bit hard to follow for non-Japanese visitors, the museum provides much information on the Fujiwara Family that governed the entire Tohoku area for about 100 years. The Fujiwara Family were purported to be descendants of a prominent court figure in the 7th century, Kamatari Fujiwara. In the 12th century, several generations after Kamatari, the Fujiwara Family in the Tohoku region were the samurai governing the region from roughly Fukushima Prefecture in the south to Aomori Prefecture in the north. Their reign started from Kiyohira Fujiwara and lasted for four generations until the late 12th century, when they were defeated by Yoritomo Minamoto, who became the first shogun and established his military government in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture. What visitors should keep in mind when visiting Hiraizumi are that (i) the Fujiwara Family were one of the prominent samurai groups that were active during the fight among samurai clans to become the champion of the samurai warriors (ii) it was the Genji clan that won the battle with the Heiji clan to ultimately become the first samurai to be designated as Seii-taishougun (meaning “Shogun in charge of the East”) empowered by the Emperor to govern Japan, (iii) the four generations were Kiyohira, Motohira, Hidehira and Yasuhira, and (iv) that the dream of the Fujiwara Family was to create a Buddhism paradise in Hiraizumi, supported by the gold mined from the region. Visitors should be able to gain much information of Hiraizumi’s heritage by visiting this museum beforehand.
    Written 14 December 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Zexenknight
    Melbourne, Australia33 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Dedicated to the hero Yoshisutne, what is more to say? A must visit for fans. This place closes at 4 pm which I found out the hard way. Will return to it when I return next year. Don't forget to visit his loyal retainer's grave - Benke - just outside Cho monji.
    Written 5 November 2015
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • tomizuta1953
    Funabashi, Japan1,355 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    I visited this shrine in early December 2023 on a guided tour of Motsu-ji and Chuson-ji temples. The shrine is located on the top plateau of Chuson-ji, adjacent to the Konjiki-do (Golden Temple). It isn’t at all strange to find a Shinto Shrine adjacent to a Buddhist temple. In fact Hakusan Shinto Shrine tells us that it was Ennin, the founder of Chuson-ji himself, that invited the deity of Hakusan Shinto Shrine in Fukui Prefecture to protect Chuson-ji. It is a classic example of how Buddhist priests founded new temples to spread the religion in harmony with the local peoples’ Shinto tradition. The shrine has a Noh theatre reconstructed in 1853. The Noh was and continues to be performed by monks of Chuson-ji. Don't miss this shrine on your visit to Chuson-ji.
    Written 21 December 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • tomizuta1953
    Funabashi, Japan1,355 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Sankozo Museum displays more than 3,000 National Treasures and Important Cultural Properties, including Buddhist statues, sutras, and the burial items of the Fujiwara lords. The admission fee is 800 yen, which includes admission to the Konjikido. The amazing collection of treasures from the late Heian era is certainly worth spending some time.
    Written 4 January 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • maritora
    Tokyo Prefecture, Japan4,665 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    This temple is said to have the ability to cure eyes. Long ago, a monk named Gyoki saved a person suffering from an eye disease. This temple was built by his relatives. Cute amulets with the letters "eye" are sold here.
    Written 4 April 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Chuzaa
    Vancouver, Canada3,485 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Historians and the Chuson-ji People consider that the Golden Hall had been left outdoor only for a short while after its completion due to its fragile nature. The Golden Hall soon received a relatively simple sheltering structure over it sometime before the mid-12th century. In 1288 during the Kamakura Period (1185-1333), a more permanent sheltering hall was built to cover the original building. The building then received many repairs and modifications since the original construction and finally came to this condition in the 16th century during the Muromachi Period.

    This Kamakura-Kamakura Periods building is seen about 100 meters away from the Golden Hall. If you see this building without knowing its original function, it looks nothing but an empty and miserable looking structure. However, it is a very old wooden structure for such a unique purpose, it is designated as an Important Cultural Property.
    Written 19 June 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • tomizuta1953
    Funabashi, Japan1,355 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    There are numerous temples within the Chuson-ji Temple complex, some of which you ought not miss. On your approach to the plateau where the Hondo (main temple building) and Konjikido (Golden Temple) are located, just before the climb from the temple entranc at the bottom of the hill ends, there is a lane stemming left from the main temple approach and leading to a wooden building reconstructed in 1827. The building is called Benkei-do, to commemorate Benkei, a warrior monk who was loyal to his master Yoritsune Minamoto (younger brother of Yoritomo Minamoto, who became the first samurai shogun) to the end. Yoritomo, unhappy with the popularity of Yoritsune who was the main hero in the feud with the Heiji clan, accused Yoritsune of mutiny, and forced Yasuhira Fujiwara (to whom Yoshitsune had fled to) to assassinate Yoshitsune in Hiraizumi. Yoshitsune was characterized as a tragic hero, and became a popular Noh theatre character.
    Written 26 December 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • John
    Leavenworth, KS1,282 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    The tourist information center is located to the right as you exit from the railway station. You can get local maps and information in English and other languages here and buy tickets for the circular bus that goes to the major sites. It may close early during the winter season. Visited 26 November 2018.
    Written 31 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
All things to do in Hiraizumi-cho
RestaurantsFlightsTravel StoriesCruisesCar Hire