Dartmoor National Park Landmarks

THE 10 BEST Dartmoor National Park Sights & Landmarks

Dartmoor National Park Landmarks

Sights & Landmarks
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Showing results 1-30 of 62

What travellers are saying

  • Amelia S
    1 contribution
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I went to pennywell farm today Wednesday 12th June I am a massive animal fan so when I come hear I’m in my element. I find all the staff very very helpful and very very kind and friendly and chatty I’m not sure on the lady who was on the till on this day but she was very nice also and the lady who was reading out each activity too. My best members of staff who I always like to chat to when I’m hear is mark ella Lauren and pippa. Great staff and great place ❤️❤️
    Written 12 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Janefandtonyj
    St Ives, UK29 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Amazing history of the rebuilding of Abbey. Rebuilt in 20th Century by 6 monks.
    Very Catholic interior. Massive stained glass windows. Pleasant small themed gardens in grounds. Excellent cafe. Free to visit Abbey, museum £2.00
    Written 12 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Carol B
    Birmingham, UK6,962 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Tuesday 14 May 2024, My husband and I went to visit Buckland Abbey under the care of the National Trust. We arrived and parked out car and took the mini bus down to the abbey.

    Buckland Abbey dates back to 1278, when it was founded as a Cistercian monastery. It was the last one built in Medieval England and Wales. For more than 250 years, monks farm the vast estate.

    Monasteries were woven into the fabric of medieval society, as they weren’t simply centres of worship, but also places of learning and charity. As these estates often had large landholdings, monasteries were often immensely wealthy and politically influential.

    The Cistercian – known as ‘White Monks’ due to their undyed habits were a branch of the Benedictine Order, following strict routines. They believed in the importance of a life of austerity, pray and manual labour. Cistercian monks tended to live in large communities in wild and remote areas, where they took on major land improvement projects.

    The monks worked as ploughmen, dairymen, shepherd’s, carpenters and masons. In fact, their farming skills and investment in local industry eventually made the order one of the richest and most influential.

    The monks built the Great Barn to store wool, fleece, cattle hides and crops such as oats, wheat and fruit from their nearby orchards. The barn also stored tithes, which were a form of local tax whereby farmers gave one tenth of their produce to the church.

    Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries (where Henry VIII disbanded monasteries sequestering their wealth), the Great Barn was used for different agricultural purposes and was modified for ‘modern farming practices’ in the 1790’s.

    During the Second World War, the barn did its bit for the war effort. Large letters on the stone walls show evidence of when it was used by the Admiralty to store grain. Today the Barn is used for exhibitions and festive displays.

    When Buckland Abbey’s time as a monastery ended, the Buckland estate was sold to Sir Richard Grenville in 1541, although his son Roger was the one to live here. However, Roger did not live to inherit Buckland as he died aboard the Mary Rose, which famously sank off Portsmouth in 1545.

    Eventually it was Roger’ son, Sir Richard Grenville (The Younger), who inherited the estate from his grandfather when he was just 21. He set about modifying the Abbey, pulling down many of the monastery buildings and converting the body of the main church into a Tudor mansion home. Sir Richard was also drawn to the sea, undertaking many early and exploratory voyages with the aim of colonising lands in North America.

    The house was later sold to Sir Francis Drake – Elizabethan Hero, Sea Captain, Privateer and Slave Trader. He was the first Englishman to circumnavigate the globe and was able to purchase Buckland Abbey using a fraction of the treasure from the voyage. His later role in the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588 cemented his fame.

    Sir Francis Drake’s career was wide ranging and complex. He was born in 1540 at Crowndale near Tavistock, to a family of shearmen (of woollen cloth) where his family had occupied the same farm for generations.

    Drake did not follow in his father’s footsteps, and instead, as early as 1560 turned to the sea and sailed on one of the slave ships belonging to his kinsman, John Hawkins. He sailed again in 1562, 1564 and in 1567 when Drake commanded a ship, the ‘Judith’ for the first time.

    Drake’s voyages – and especially his circumnavigation of the globe from 1577 to 1580 brought him into contact with a wide range of people in the Atlantic world. This included people from European countries fighting to dominate trade and to establish colonies, freed and enslaved African people transported to both North and South America, and Indigenous Native Americans whose knowledge was crucial to Drake and his crew’s survival.

    Drake was rarely at home during his ownership of Buckland Abbey. With him being always away at sea, his last voyage was in 1595. After plans to attack the Spanish again in Panama, a fever broke out aboard his ship and Drake died of dysentery in 1596. He had no children so the ownership of Buckland Abbey passed to his brother Thomas Drake.

    Buckland remained in the ownership of the Drake family and their descendants until 1946. During this time, the family split their time between Buckland and other houses, principally Nutwell Court in Devon. In the 18th Century, the agricultural improver William Marshall advised the family on farming improvements. In the early 19th Century, the architect Samuel Pepys Cockerel was employed to remodel parts of the building and estate.

    Buckland Abbey was acquired by the National Trust in 1946 at the instigation of Lady Astor.

    My husband and I wandered around this lovely house (it was very hot and humid inside the house) and looked at the exhibits on display which included the deck of a ship and took lots of photographs. Afterwards we went out and looked round the gardens with their beautiful flowers and wisteria and trickling fountains. It was very inspirational as I wrote two poems here called ‘Buckland Abbey’ and ‘Life Reflections’.

    My husband and I by now were in need of refreshments, so we went to ‘The Tea Room’, where my husband had a nice hot chocolate and I had a nice Gingerbread latte coffee. We spend a nice hour here relaxing after our walk round the house, barn and gardens.

    We took the mini bus back to the visitor centre, where we collected our car and drove back to Chagford.
    Written 21 May 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • cngj
    Looe, UK751 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    We had been meaning to visit here for a while as we seemed to be always driving past, but we eventually visited when we had planned to visit Okehampton Castle and it was unexpectedly closed. We fitted in a trip around the castle and then sat and ate our lunch in the gardens. It was an enjoyable few hours.
    Written 26 May 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • KrisWB
    Swanage, UK49 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Stunning and fascinating. The guides were full of knowledge and everything was well preserved with informative signs and displays dotted around. Very very interesting and well worth the couple of hours.
    Written 21 October 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sarah C
    23 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    What a fabulous day!! My sister and I got this experience for our mums birthday (and we gatecrashed!)
    I have the privilege of being Helen’s alpaca vet and it was wonderful to experience the other side of these animals. They are a credit to Helen’s patience and care of them. The farm is located on Dartmoor, so within a short space of time we were trekking amongst the beautiful scenery, cows and sheep. Lots of bathing spots for the alpacas to cool off and provide some great entertainment.
    Helen tailors the walk and animals to your needs - including heavily pregnant women!! Highly recommend topping the experience off with lunch at The Dartmoor Inn at Lydford. We will be back!
    Written 2 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Steve Buckley
    London, UK8,854 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    As members of an 18-strong Rail Discoveries Group, my wife and myself visited Clapper Bridge at Postbridge in Dartmoor earlier today.

    It is well worth seeing although unlikely to take up more than 15 minutes of your time. Please take the time to stop and do so (plenty of parking available I the nearby Visitors Centre car park) if passing by.
    Written 3 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sarah B
    Teignmouth, UK468 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This review is specifically about a site at Hound Tor which is often missed. The ruins of Hound Tor medieval village are situated beyond the tor and down the far slop. They are in a sheltered position (the original builders knew their stuff. The village comprised of several 13th century longhouses (people at one end, animals at other). Excavations in the 1960s showed that the village was only occupied during the 13th and 14th centuries and that in addition to the longhouses there were barns, yards and stock pens, so an agricultural settlement. I have tried to show as many of the remains as possible in my photos. The history of this site is very interesting and it is worth the extra effort of going beyond the main tor to take a look. Hound Tor has a reasonably sized car park, which often has a catering van offering local snacks and drinks.
    Written 23 January 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Elaine
    Ramsden Heath, UK24 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Thé tour of the house was superb with so many treasures to enjoy. And the gardens were an absolute delight
    Written 25 July 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Angling-CoachdotNet
    Steyning, UK8 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Took my friend fishing - we were warmly welcomed with coffee and chatted to the bailiff who shared some key knowledge in fly selection and offered to help set up equipment. The venue has lots of natural vegetation and plenty of insect life for the trout to feed on. The lakes are fed from the river Tavi and the flowing fresh wash makes for hard fighting fish in mint condition great tasting for the table. I caught 3 rainbows and my friend got a PB 6lb Brown trout on a Parachute Adams Dry fly...
    Written 11 October 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • June A
    Surrey, UK2,734 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I love Grimsound - the thrill of driving towards it with the sun or sometimes the mist on the moors as you wind along the road with those views and then to step out of the car and walk up the bank towards it and see that imposing wall for the first time. I have seen many different sites like this around the British Isles but this is far and away the best preserved - most sites are just scattered crcles and houses but this is a proper community and settlement with the enclosed wall still standing. There are several cist graves too on the path up the enclosure. One can only begin to imagine how and why this was built and how they lived and there is still much that we don't know. It is just so amospheric here though with wonderful views in literally all directions - you feel as if you're at the end of the world.
    Written 21 May 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Claire B
    118 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Quaint castle and ruins, worth a visit if you are in need of a quick stop.

    Pleasant village to walk through, very quiet. The church next to the castle is also well maintained and worth a look at.
    Written 29 July 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • broganmc
    Plymouth, UK441 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    As a birthday treat my husband took me here as he knew I liked sculptures. At present they are throughout the grounds alongside art exhibitions.
    Despite thunder and lightning briefly and an extremely heavy downpour, we enjoyed hours looking around these amazing grounds.
    One needs to be fairly mobile, there are slight inclines on the garden lawns, and the sculptures are spaced out throughout the grounds. So good walking shoes a must.
    The cafe serve hot drinks, cakes , rolls and soup. A great place to head for should you get caught out with showers . There are toilet facilities around the grounds which are clean and tidy.
    All the staff we came in contact with were most pleasant, friendly and helpful. The brochure you are given on entry has a detailed map, and I’ve enjoyed reading about the various artists displaying their interesting and varied work.
    An added bonus is knowing they are supporting the charity Hugs. It really is worth a visit, easy to find and plenty of parking. Dogs are welcome but not into the house grounds. There is a very large field and lake to exercise them.
    I had the most wonderful day here celebrating my birthday doing two things I so enjoy, gardens and art.
    Written 22 May 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Carol B
    Birmingham, UK6,962 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Thursday 16 May 2024, My husband and I went to visit the church of St Petroc, next to the Lydford castle.

    It is an early Christian foundation dedicated to one of the most popular Celtic saints of the South West. It is a very interesting church and has some interesting gravestones in particular one dedicated to a watchmaker, his epitaph poem is carved into his grave, but you can buy a postcard with the poem on it, which is really quite cleaver and very quirky.

    I found inspiration in the church and I wrote a poem called ‘Scented Vision’ inspired by lovely bouquets of lily’s on the church altar, their wonderful fragrance perfuming the air in the church.

    We also took some beautiful photographs of this lovely church and its very well maintained church yard.
    Written 22 May 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sara
    Devon, UK28 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Visited Foggintor Quarry a few weeks ago with a friend and my dog. Had a lovely walk around the quarry and surrounding area. I've heard from friends that there are leeches in the water so we avoided a swim but I have heard that it is a good wild swimming spot. We walked across to Kings Tor and back through the Quarry ruins again. Not a very strenuous walk at all so I imagine most people could manage it, good for the whole family. It was a surprisingly quiet day so we took lunch and sat at the top of Kings Tor to have it. Stunning views of wild Dartmoor. Highly recommend this walk. I would recommend choosing a sunny/clear day if you want the views - bare in mind this is Dartmoor, the weather changes very quickly so dress appropriately or take waterproofs just incase!
    Written 31 July 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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