Architectural Buildings in Fes

THE 10 BEST Fes Architectural Buildings

Architectural Buildings in Fes

Types of Attractions
Sights & Landmarks
Sights & Landmarks
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15 places sorted by traveller favourites
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What travellers are saying

  • Danny S
    Sugar City, ID15 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Absolutely my favorite site in all of Fez. We went in the late afternoon and had the place to ourselves. Due to recent restoration work, this was the best preserved of the three madrasas we visited that day. The masonry and carpentry wonderfully done. The dormitory rooms on the second and third floors provide some good views of the streets below and the Kairouan University/mosque nearby.
    Written 6 February 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Danny S
    Sugar City, ID15 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Of the Fez madrasas, this one is unique in that it is still adjoined to a working mosque which provides an added element not seen at some of the others. Also because of this, access is limited. It is widely considered among the finest instances of Marinid architecture in Fez. Excellent examples of masonry, carpentry, and craftmenship.
    Written 6 February 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • LolaGo1
    Washington DC, DC6,407 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    On my first day in Fes, I used this beautiful gate as my reference point to go back to my riad. There are lots do behind these Gate: eating at restaurants, shopping, buying Moroccan sweets, visiting tourist attractions, watching people passing by, etc.

    Noted that this Gate has 2 colors: Blue on one side, green on the other side. In front of this Gate are the modern parts of Fes.
    Written 11 October 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • LolaGo1
    Washington DC, DC6,407 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    We passed by this place while driving from the Train Station to my riad inside the medina. Our taxi driver, in his broken English, told us to visit before it leaving Fes. As most TA reviewers are saying, only the outside areas can be visited at this time. Excellent background for photo shoots!
    Written 12 October 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • BobPraz
    Toronto, Canada231 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The palace itself is a fascinating architectural treasure from the late 19th and early 20th century. There are two main courtyards with rooms branching off them, each with sumptuous decoration, some of it in a semi-dilapidated state. This is not an official government-run site, but a private mansion that the owner has opened to visitors. The price is nonetheless constant and the owner doesn't pressure you into anything (unlike some other private sites where the guardian might cite an arbitrary price, or you have to negotiate with a shopkeeper, etc). I think it was 30 dirhams, if I remember correctly.

    Because it's not under government control, it hasn't undergone the extensive (and occasionally heavy-handed) restorations that other historic monuments have. That's a big part of what actually makes this place interesting, not to mention the complete lack of crowds. Myself and my partner enjoyed it the quiet, faded opulence. It's safe, though the building is indeed in urgent need of care. Some areas are showing clear signs of damage, but some rooms still look in great condition.

    There are things that visitors may find troubling or off-putting, and I frankly don't know enough context to judge further. It's well known that the palace is in decay because it's privately owned and restoration would require a lot of time and money. You can see from earlier photos that one of the two beautiful wooden balconies in the second courtyard collapsed in recent years (the wall where it was once attached has since been plastered over), and the other one is now showing cracks too. The only hope for rescue at this point would surely be a government or international intervention. There was also indeed a dog being kept in the fountain inside the first courtyard when we were there, which barked constantly while we were nearby. It was a hot day so it must have been uncomfortable for it. It seemed in good health, so I don't know if it's otherwise mistreated. I suspect the owner keeps it there during visiting hours and perhaps keeps it as a guard dog the rest of the time.

    Optimistically speaking, perhaps the steady trickle of visitors will encourage someone to finally rescue the building. You'll have to decide for yourself though if some of the issues above would put you off from visiting.
    Written 7 July 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Nomad07706863409
    3 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Beautiful city , amazing history , very tasty food ... People's are very friendly, we like to be there .
    Written 2 January 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • kitty H
    Jensen Beach, FL193 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    One of the more interesting things we saw,$5 entrance it’s a stunning building -caravan hotel for people and animals, also interesting tools, artifacts..be sure to go to the rooftop!
    Written 11 February 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Ayoub S
    Merzouga, Morocco18 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    thanks ayoub for all what you have done with us. very good holiday in the south of morocco We were with our guide Ayoub having a very good vacation.
    Thank you .
    Written 4 November 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • bg564
    Windhoek, Namibia888 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Our guide gave use the history of the dar al-magana water clock which was very interesting but would have been better if it could have been a whole exhibit. The guide explained to us that at some point they had tried to put brass plates up to demonstrate how it must have looked but he also explained that after the original builders of the clock had finished the work nobody knew how to service it. Amazing that this little bit of history remains of a clock from the 14th century. Right across from the Bou Inania Medresa so this part of the medina is well worth visiting.
    Written 20 March 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • HINA W
    Islamabad, Pakistan6,566 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    Bab Guissa is a 12th century gate which was named after the the governor of the city in those days. It was built under the Almohad rule. It is one of the three main gates of the city. It is located in the old Qayrawan section of the city. It leads to the
    Merenid tombs in the North of Fes. It is an arched stone structure. If you look at it from the city side you can see a green tiles overhanging. This was more of a defensive building with angular shape and guard terraces.
    Written 25 November 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mariem K
    2 contributions
    1.0 of 5 bubbles
    Fellow travelers, for those of you who are willing to visit Palace Mnebhi I would like to recount an incident involving the so called owner of this place.
    I was visiting Fez with friends, wandering the streets of Medina when I saw some people gathering outside a palace ( Mnebhi), some were leaving, others were entering. So out of curiosity I tried to get in that's when I heard someone shouting from the back ordering me to step back. I was stunned so I asked him for an explanation, bcz I thought it like any other ancient monument in Morocco, no reservation required. But instead of answering the simple question he started mocking me in front of everyone else, by repeating my question back to me, why? Because I want to, he said. I just couldn't believe his reaction, it felt so offensive and humiliating. I just stood there bewildered when one of my friends ( who is a male ) told him : she asked you a simple question he replied ,all while ignoring me : These foreign tourists booked the place in advance, She ( in reference to me) doesn't have the right to question me about my own place.
    I'm still confused, was it because I'm a moroccan tourist ? A woman? Or worse, of a different skin color ?
    If I spoke a different tongue than his, would I have gotten a response without all the mockery and public shaming!
    Fez is a beautiful city, something I had to make an effort to be able to see after that terrible encounter.
    Be wise when choosing where to put your money, Bon voyage !
    Written 15 November 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Dimitris L
    Sydney, Australia45,371 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    Another Gate of which Fes has quite a number. This particular one is rather plain, built in a simpler architectural style from other Gates. It has some history behind it so it might be worth a stop if you are walking close by.
    Written 3 June 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • HINA W
    Islamabad, Pakistan6,566 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    This gate was built at the start of the thirteenth century. It was constructed in the Almohad architectural style, under the rule of Sultan Mohammad Al Nasir in 1204. It is a sandstone structure with two guard towers. You can access the Bab Mahrouk Cemetery and the Anouar Kasbah from here. At one time it was called Bab Ash Sharia meaning the Gate of Justice. But as people like to associate objects to thrilling events it started being called Bab Mahrouk. The word Mahrouk means Burnt in Arabic, hence it is means the Gate of the Burnt after the body of a rebel was burnt here to educate people to be loyal to the rulers. After that it became a tradition to display the heads of executed rebels here.
    Written 2 December 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • HINA W
    Islamabad, Pakistan6,566 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The word Seba means seven in Arabic. It is named after the the seven brothers of Moulay Abdellah. He ruled during the 18th century. This gate connects two of the main parade grounds of Fes namely the Petit Méchouar and Vieux Méchouar. This is a historic gate where not only grand military parades and royal ceremonies were held but also gory executions were held. When Portuguese tried to conquer Tangier in 1437 and failed the Moroccans captured Prince Ferdinand, the brother of the King. He was executed and his body was hung here for four days.
    Written 2 December 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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