Tunisia Hotels

THE 10 BEST Hotels in Tunisia

Tunisia Hotels

and Places to Stay
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1,635 properties in Tunisia
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Tunisia Hotels Information

Hotels in Tunisia

1,538

Hotels Prices From

£19

Hotels Reviews

511,284

Hotels Photos

565,775

Popular Places in Tunisia

  • Hammamet
    Sunbathing, al fresco dining and late-night discos are a way of life in Hammamet, the Tunisian St-Tropez. Located on the fertile Cap Bon Peninsula, about 40 miles south of Tunis, the bayfront resort is surrounded by verdant hills and citrus groves. When not basking on Hammamet Beach, browse the markets for local pottery or wander through the medina (old city) with walls that date to 1500. Summer brings festival fever to the city with plenty of music and theatrical offerings.
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  • Midoun
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  • Sousse
    Sitting where the Phoenician colony of Hadrumetum once stood nearly 3,000 years ago, the modern-day Sousse is a resort destination, especially popular with Europeans. Sometimes called "the Pearl of the Sahel" (referring to the central section of Tunisia's eastern shoreline), Sousse is prized for its excellent beaches. Arab-Islamic since the 7th century AD, the city has many fascinating attractions, like the 9th-century Great Mosque, and its medina is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
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  • Monastir
    Set on the Gulf of Hammamet, Monastir’s white-sand beaches, palm-lined promenade, and historical landmarks offer an appealing alternative to coast’s busier resorts. Add in year-round sun, vibrant souks, and a relaxed ambience, and you have one of Tunisia's most inviting destinations.
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  • Port El Kantaoui
    Constructed in 1979 as a holiday resort, Port El Kantaoui is a playground of chic boutiques, beaches, golf courses and waterfront restaurants on the central Tunisian coast. Activity buzzes around the marina where Mediterranean jetsetters dock their yachts. Cobblestone streets and Moorish-Andalusian architecture provide North African flavor in a tourist-friendly environment. For a more authentic look at Tunisia, the port city of Sousse is only a 10-minute taxi ride away.
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  • Mahdia
    Founded in the early 10th century as the capital of Fatimid-ruled Tunisia, Mahdia is today a quiet port town and provincial center of about 40,000 people, known for its fishing, silk weaving and olive industries. One of Tunisia's most picturesque cities, Mahdia lies between Sousse and Sfax and has many historic attractions, including the ruins of an ancient Punic city (pre-dating Mahdia), the Fatimid port, the first Fatimid mosque (built in the 10th century), and a 16th-century Ottoman fort.
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  • Tunis
    Founded by the Berbers in the 2nd millennium BCE, the city of Tunis has been controlled by Phoenicians, Romans, Arab Muslims, the Ottomans, the Spanish, the French and the Germans, finally achieving independence as the capital of Tunisia in 1956. This history has made Tunis a mélange of ancient and modern cultures. The medina is a network of narrow alleyways, mosques, mausoleums, palaces and a souq where shoppers haggle over the price of everything from filigreed gold to inexpensive souvenirs.
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  • Houmt Souk
    Houmt-Souk is a tranquil cultural hub, a peaceful meeting point of varying religions and ethnicities. Nowhere is this melange more evident than at the markets, where you could spend hours, even days, poring over locally crafted pottery, jewelry, leather goods, textiles and artwork, as well as a bounty of fruits, vegetables, spices and meats. Don’t miss the beachside fortress, a massive 15th-century structure that’s one of the most important archaeological sites of the region.
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