Cardigan Hotels With Indoor Pools

THE BEST Cardigan Hotels With Indoor Pools

Cardigan Hotels With Indoor Pools

Why worry about the weather when you can enjoy pool time anytime?

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Hotels With Indoor Pools nearby destinations

  • Pembrokeshire

    Pembrokeshire, tucked away in South West Wales, is a remote but beautiful corner of the UK, with spectacular coastlines on three sides and gorgeous countryside alongside highly picturesque towns such as Tenby, Fishguard and Haverfordwest. And as if that wasn't enough for a family holiday, it's recently been a filming location for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows!

    Pembrokeshire is a county made for explorers. You can explore the coastline over the traditional paths, or indulge in a little coasteering - the seaside equivalent of free running, only with more swimming - around St David's. St David's is the UK's smallest city, and the cathedral is also well worth a visit while you're drying your socks after the coasteering, and elsewhere there are sights such as the Preseli Hills (where the stones used to build Stonehenge were quarried) and more universally appealing attractions like Oakwood Theme Park, which has rollercoasters and rides and occasional appearances from bands like Girls Aloud. Also, young historians will love the huge number of castles that litter the county in various states of repair, particularly the imposing Pembroke Castle, whose walls sit on top of a site which has been occupied since Roman times.

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  • Tenby
    Tenby is lovingly protected from the outside world by an embrace of 13th-century stone walls, which, ironically, attract—not repel—visitors from all over the world. The town is simply adorable, teeming with the archetypes of pubs and shops one would expect to find in a U.K. city. Adding further appeal are the miles of gorgeous beaches and the gently lapping waves of a blue-grey sea.
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  • Swansea

    Swansea, on the Gower Peninsula in South Wales, is a great family friendly holiday destination. With miles of beaches covered in golden sands, medieval castles, craft shops, rolling hills and world-class museums, there is plenty to do in the area. The city itself is great for kids as the centre is small enough that it is easy to walk around, and quite pedestrian friendly.

    There is so much to do in the area - from exploring the fishing village of Mumbles, to visiting museums such as the National Waterfront Museum (a look at the Industrial Revolution) and the Dylan Thomas Centre. TV fans can have fun spotting filming locations for series such as Doctor Who (Swansea doubled for Victorian Cardiff in 2005 episode The Unquiet Dead). For the more outdoors types, as well as exploring the coastline and countryside on foot, there are also several companies offering boat trips around the coast. The Gower Peninsula was one of the first areas to be designated as a site of outstanding natural beauty in the UK, and as such its woodlands and valleys are well worth exploring, and the area is also home to several parks and nature reserves, including Swansea Vale Nature Reserve - an exciting scarce wetland area which comes complete with bike trails and board walks. Sports fans might not often be excited to see Championship team Swansea City AFC play football at the Liberty Stadium, but Glamorgan County Cricket Club play at St Helen's Stadium. Keen shoppers can also head straight to The Quadrant Centre and Oxford Street for a mixture of chain stores and more independent outlets. Swansea Market, which lies between the two areas, is also the largest market in Wales.

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  • Snowdonia-Eryri National Park
    Make sure to pack your wellies, because Snowdonia National Park is one of the wettest spots in the U.K. Besides being soggy, it’s also pretty impressive. A fairly easy hike takes you to the top of Yr Wyddfa, the highest peak in Wales (topping any peaks in England, too), where peregrine falcons nest in the jagged cliffs. The park also has the largest lake in Wales, Llyn Tegid. It has its own Loch Ness-style monster—called Teggie, of course—though some figure it’s just an unusually large pike. This Snowdonia’s wonders can also be found on a smaller scale. Keep an eye out for the Snowdon beetle, which has rainbow stripes down its back.
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  • Ceredigion
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  • South Wales
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  • Ilfracombe
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  • Barnstaple
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Popular destinations for Hotels With Indoor Pools

  • Devon
    Devon Cottages - The Ultimate in Relaxing Breaks

    From the wilds of Dartmoor to the wooded hillsides of the Lyn Valley, Devon is undoubtedly one of England's most beautiful counties. Its overwhelmingly rural landscape means that catered accommodation is restricted to over-subscribed Bed and Breakfasts and hotels which are mostly concentrated in towns like Exeter and Barnstaple.

    Devon is a great location for a family holiday in the great outdoors, with everything from beach resorts at Ilfracombe to rambling in the hills of Exmoor and tors of Dartmoor. It is a large county, but whether you want to follow the Tarka Trail, or walk down the Doone Valley, you can be sure there will be cottages open for holiday rentals nearby.

    Devon's Cottages, All Mod Cons

    Most of Devon's holiday rental cottages started as farm buildings of some sort, and planning restrictions mean that many of them retain their rural charm on the outside. However, the cottages are generally renovated to 21st Century standards inside, with double glazing, TV, washing machines and fully-equipped kitchens. Families are well catered for in the higher end properties with games rooms, sometimes including full-size pool tables and large gardens for children to explore.

    Despite the unpredictability of Devon's weather even during the summer months, the comfort of these properties gives great peace of mind. Moreover, a week's holiday rental of a cottage in Devon can cost as little as £300 - £400. During the peak season you can spend as much as £900 a month for one of the larger or more luxurious cottages, which still works out to be cheaper than a lot of hotels, especially if you have to book several rooms to accommodate a family of four or five.

    Town Mouse or Country Mouse

    To get the best of Devon's startling countryside and its friendly communities, renting a holiday cottage near Lynton and Lynmouth can be a good start. It is a useful base from which to explore North Devon, and is within walking distance of several beauty spots, such as Watersmeet (complete with a small but impressive waterfall) and the Valley of the Rocks. Separated by a steep cliff, you can travel up a funicular railway from coastal Lynmouth to clifftop Lynton, with plenty of stunning walks, shopping opportunities and several beaches and boat trips to nearby coastal attractions.

    The twin villages also boast a concentration of well-equipped holiday cottages, from modest fisherman's cottages on the path to Watersmeet to grander hillside houses on the way to the Valley of the Rocks. Whatever your budget, Lynton and Lynmouth can provide some tempting accommodation options for your first Devon holiday.

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  • Isle of Wight
    The Isle of Wight is the perfect place to enjoy some peace, quiet and natural beauty. Except perhaps in the summer, when the Isle of Wight Festival draws visitors from all over the world. In 1970, the Festival was the largest rock-music event ever held. It was called Britain's Woodstock and featured Jimi Hendrix and The Who. (Not so much peace or quiet that week.) The island is also known for its world-famous sailing and lovely resorts, where people have been holiday-making since Victorian times.
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  • Lake District
    Cumbria's valleys and fells (as the low mountains are known) are home to idyllic villages, high moorlands and picturesque lakes. Literary buffs will enjoy Wordsworth's Dove Cottage (go in March to see daffodils), and if you've got kids in tow, visit The World of Beatrix Potter. Or just enjoy a leisurely drive through beautiful scenery.
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  • London
    From Shoreditch’s swaggering style to Camden’s punky vibe and chic Portobello Road, London is many worlds in one. The city’s energy means that no two days are the same. Explore royal or historic sites, tick off landmarks from your bucket list, eat and drink in exclusive Michelin-starred restaurants, enjoy a pint in a traditional pub, or get lost down winding cobbled streets and see what you stumble across – when it comes to London, the possibilities are endless.
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  • Barcelona
    Stroll Las Ramblas and enjoy Barcelona's unique blend of Catalan culture, distinctive architecture, lively nightlife and trendy, stylish hotels. You'll find Europe's best-preserved Gothic Quarter here, as well as amazing architectural works by Gaudi. La Sagrada Familia, considered Gaudi's masterpiece, is still under construction (your entrance fee helps to fund the project). Feel like a picnic? Look no further than the rambunctious La Boqueria market, where you can stock up on local delicacies.
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  • Palma de Mallorca
    Palma, the economic and cultural hub of Majorca, is a delightful base for exploring the island's many gold and white beaches. A former Moorish casbah, or walled city, Palma's Old Town is an appealing maze of narrow streets that are a delight to explore on foot. Hop on the Soller Railway for a 17-mile scenic trip, visit 14th-century Bellver Castle and the museum of contemporary art, and check out the nightlife.
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  • Benidorm
    Bask on four miles of golden beaches, hit the Mediterranean Sea on water skis or stroll along Benidorm's promenade and revel in its seaside charms; it's a true Spanish beauty of the Costa Blanca. Originally a fishing town, the city's historic center wows with its blue-domed 18th-century church and picturesque alleyways. Panoramic views reward those who climb into the surrounding Canfali hills, and nearby rocky coves reveal underwater riches for scuba enthusiasts. End a day in the sun with a feast of local seafood.
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  • Malaga
    Malaga, Pablo Picasso's birthplace and the gateway to the Costa del Sol, is a hectic, sometimes unruly city of 550,000. An impressive number of museums and monuments, including the 11th-century Alcazaba fort and Museu Picasso Malaga, provide plenty of diversions for those who opt not to spend all their time on the coast's famed beaches and in their accompanying bars. The old city bustles with taverns and bistros. The generous Paseo del Parque offers a delightful stroll past banana trees and fountains.
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