Konstanz Luxury Lodges

THE BEST Luxury Lodges in Konstanz

Konstanz Luxury Lodges

World-class amenities and thoughtful touches for the discerning traveller.

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Haubers Alpenresort Gutshof, hotel in Konstanz
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40.5 miles from Konstanz
#1 of 36 Specialty lodging in Oberstaufen
Hofgut Albführen, hotel in Konstanz
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32.3 miles from Konstanz
#1 of 1 Specialty lodging in Dettighofen
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32.1 miles from Konstanz
#2 of 9 Specialty lodging in Bad Waldsee

Luxury Lodges nearby destinations

  • Zurich
    The largest city in Switzerland is a major contemporary art and shopping destination. Important artworks are displayed in the Kunsthaus and the Rietberg Museum. Those who consider shopping an art can hone their skills along Bahnhofstrasse and Niederdorf. Chagall's stained-glass windows in the Fraumünster amaze. Zurich's 500 clubs and bars, including several in swimming pools, pulse with life till the early hours. This city on Lake Zurich has excellent public transport and a free bike-hire system.
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  • Lech
    Glitzy Lech is one of Austria's most moneyed resort towns. Pricy, posh palaces abound, but this ostentatious, old-school winter wonderland has accommodation and a place on the pistes for all budgets. Popular since the 1920 and 1930s, this former farming town has managed to retain its original character and charm. Its somewhat isolated location forces an often tricky drive in inclement weather but also is part of what appeals to celebrity admirers. Nearest airports are Zurich and Innsbruck.
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  • Lucerne
    Lucerne is an ancient town with strikingly modern sensibilities. One of Europe’s oldest covered bridges serves as its centrepiece, and fresco-adorned historic houses line the streets, but it’s also home to the cutting-edge KKL, a concert hall and art gallery. Take the cableways up the Pilatus, Stanserhorn or Rigi mountains for breathtaking views, or see Lake Lucerne on a steamship cruise.
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  • Austrian Alps
    The majestic Austrian Alps stretch across the country, an awe-striking area of Ice Age valleys, verdant heaths and alluvial cones within Europe's largest national park, 700-square-mile Hohe Tauern. Taking in the dramatic cities of Salzburg and Innsbruck and the beautiful province of Tirol, home to spectacular skiing and hiking, as well as Gross Glockner, Austria's highest peak, and some of the world's best winter and summer sports playgrounds, the Austrian Alps are an outdoor lover's paradise.
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  • Black Forest
    Fairytale villages, thermal baths, casinos and pine and birch-blanketed mountains beckon travelers to southwestern Germany's Black Forest. Scenic drives and train trips showcase the best of the area. Skiing, hiking, mountain climbing, boating and ice-skating are popular activities. Baden-Baden's Roman-Irish baths, 19th-century performance hall, casino and fresco-adorned Pump Room are much visited. Gothic masterpiece Freiburg Cathedral and its famous Boys' Choir also draw visitors.
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  • St. Anton am Arlberg
    One of the Tirol area’s most popular ski resorts, St. Anton offers some of the best expert skiing and one of the liveliest après-ski scenes in the Arlberg region. The Valluga, Kapall, and Schindler peaks offer almost a mile of vertical skiing. For the seasoned, Schindlerkar and Mattun are less groomed routes.
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  • Freiburg im Breisgau
    The city of Freiburg im Breisgau sits austerely on the edge of the Black Forest. Home to one of Germany’s oldest universities and a Gothic sandstone cathedral, it’s a hub for academics and medieval history buffs. Chug German suds at a local brewery, then hop a cable car up Schauinsland mountain, where astounding views and a solar observatory await.
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  • Basel
    Located on the Rhine River near the borders of France and Germany, Basel contains the country's highest concentration of museums. The culture-centric city, site of the world's most influential art market each June, is also home to the lovely Munster Cathedral, made of red sandstone with a multi-colored tile roof. Green spaces abound, including the popular zoological gardens in the city center. Switzerland's largest site of Roman ruins, Augusta Raurica, are an easy day trip to the east.
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  • Schruns
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Popular destinations for Luxury Lodges

  • Norfolk

    A holiday in Norfolk is not a glamourous break. While the Norfolk Broads of East Anglia are a beautiful part of the UK, they represent a relaxing rural getaway rather than a high-powered city-break. Although its reputation is mostly rural, with people associating the county mostly with the wetlands of the Norfolk Broads, there are also towns such as Norwich and King's Lynn to visit, both of which provide shopping opportunities, nightlife and entertainment. Norfolk also contains a large stretch of coastline, and seaside destinations such as Cromer and Great Yearmouth mean there are great beaches to be found as well. Many areas of the Norfolk Broads and the coastal region are sites of outstanding natural beauty, and are also protected as bird reserves, so take a pair of binoculars on holiday. There are also popular wildlife attractions such as Banham Zoo, with a great collection of big cats, and Great Yarmouth's Sea Life Centre, one of the biggest of its kind in the country, complete with tropical sharks and conger eels. And of course, if any of your family are interested in boating, you'll need to rent a boat and explore the waterways of the Broads themselves!

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  • Cornwall
    Cornwall is the extreme southwestern peninsula of England. It has the longest stretch of continuous coastline in Britain and it is one of the sunniest areas in the UK. With picturesque villages, Celtic ruins, light blue waters, gardens and parks and unique architecture it certainly is among the most scenic areas of England. Home of many events and festivals and the land of Cornish pasty, it is definitely worth visiting.
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  • Lake District
    Cumbria's valleys and fells (as the low mountains are known) are home to idyllic villages, high moorlands and picturesque lakes. Literary buffs will enjoy Wordsworth's Dove Cottage (go in March to see daffodils), and if you've got kids in tow, visit The World of Beatrix Potter. Or just enjoy a leisurely drive through beautiful scenery.
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  • Maasai Mara National Reserve
    Maybe your local zoo has lions, leopards, zebras or elephants. Maybe they even have wildebeest. But we bet they don't have 1.3 million wildebeest—never mind 1.3 million wildebeest in migration, with predators in hot pursuit. It's one of the most awesome sights in nature, and you can see it at Masai Mara in southwestern Kenya.
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  • North Wales

    The recent trend for staycation holidays means that British people are increasingly rediscovering the natural beauty that lies on their doorstep and North Wales is a ruggedly good example of this. Snowdonia is a region of great natural beauty that is dominated by mountain ranges including the Snowdon mountain from which the region takes its name. The gigantic Snowdonia national park offers visitors hill-walking, mountain climbing, and wildlife watching. Or, if you fancy a change of scenery, you can come down from the mountains to the 200+ miles of coast. There, you’ll find secluded coves and world class beaches such as the five mile long Tywyn beach.

    Sometimes it’s good to take the weight off your feet and the Snowdon Mountain Railway offers a unique opportunity to ride a steam train up to the top of a 3,560 foot mountain, enjoying stunning views along the way. The line has been in operation for over a hundred years and children under the age of 4 go free, making it perfect for families whose kids have a Thomas the Tank Engine fixation!

    One of the great attractions Wales offers tourists is its wealth of historic castles and Caernarfon Castle stands as one of the most imposing relics of a distant time. Built in 1283 by the English King Edward the First, its initial role was to help subdue any thoughts of Welsh rebellion but it now helps Welsh coffers by attracting countless visitors.

    The Isle of Anglesey is an island situated off the north-west Welsh coast but connected to the mainland by two bridges across the Menai Strait. It’s yet another area of great natural beauty and is worth a visit during your North Wales sojourn. As an island, it offers lots for water lovers including sailing, kayaking, surfing, kite surfing, diving, and fishing. Or you can just dip your toes as you enjoy one of Anglesey’s great beaches.

    With kids in mind, make sure you schedule a visit to the Anglesey Sea Zoo. It’s the biggest aquarium in Wales and will bring you face to face with a huge variety of marine species including conger eels, octopus, lobsters, and sharks!

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