Lochinver Luxury Lodges

THE BEST Luxury Lodges in Lochinver

Lochinver Luxury Lodges

World-class amenities and thoughtful touches for the discerning traveller.

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Assynt House, hotel in Lochinver
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47.5 miles from Lochinver

Luxury Lodges nearby destinations

  • Isle of Lewis
    A visit to the Isle of Lewis is like stepping into the pages of a Scottish fairy tale. Everywhere you look, medieval structures remind you of the island’s remarkable history. The legendary Callanish Standing Stones poke up from the ground like a strange and massive stone city. The Blackhouse, the Shawbost Norse Mill and Kiln, and the Carloway Broch all offer insight into what life on Lewis used to look like. Cheerful Stornoway boasts a charming, colourful harbour and several lovely restaurants and pubs.
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  • Lewis and Harris
    A visit to Lewis and Harris is like stepping into the pages of a Scottish fairy tale. In Lewis—the northern part of the island—the legendary Callanish Standing Stones poke up from the ground like a strange and massive rock city. The Blackhouse, the Shawbost Norse Mill and Kiln, and the Carloway Broch all offer a peek at what island life used to look like. In southern Harris, the east side beaches boast some of the oldest known rocks in the world, dating back millions of years. Cruise over to the volcanic islands of St. Kilda to explore the ruins of a medieval village.
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  • Inverness
    This compact Scottish city is perfect for exploration by foot — travellers can easily find their way from the lovely River Ness to historic Inverness Castle and St. Andrews Cathedral, and beyond to the events at Eden Court and the busy Victorian Market. It’s also an ideal base for exploring the Highlands, with the mysterious Loch Ness (and famed local resident Nessie), Culloden Battlefield and the Bronze Age Clava Cairns just a quick drive away.
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  • Scottish Highlands
    The moody, romantic Scottish Highlands start at Loch Lomond just north of Glasgow. Comprising a slew of mountain ranges, this sparsely populated land is best seen by train on the West Highland Line. Mountains, lochs, bright heather and rhododendrons give way to white sand beaches and rugged coves as the train nears Mallaig. For a more active take on the region, hike the West Highland Way or visit the Trossachs National Park. Ben Nevis, a popular climbing spot, looms over the town of Fort William.
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  • Loch Ness Region
    With depths reaching 700 feet and a length of more than 20 miles, Loch Ness provides plenty of hiding places for its legendary monster. Should you tire of searching for Nessie, this scenic section of the Scottish Highlands also has charming villages like Drumnadrochit and Fort Augustus, open-air Shakespearean productions, multiple golf courses and medieval Urquhart Castle. Wildlife of the non-mythological variety and ancient Caledonian pine forests can be found in the Glen Affric nature reserve.
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  • Isle of Skye
    The landscape is dramatic—even a bit moody, with the Cuillin Range in the background—but outdoorsy kids will have a blast on the Isle of Skye. Plenty of water sports are available, and you’ll also find great hiking and even pony rides. Portree, the largest town, makes a great base for exploring this striking island.
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  • North Kessock
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  • Croy
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Popular destinations for Luxury Lodges

  • Lake District
    Cumbria's valleys and fells (as the low mountains are known) are home to idyllic villages, high moorlands and picturesque lakes. Literary buffs will enjoy Wordsworth's Dove Cottage (go in March to see daffodils), and if you've got kids in tow, visit The World of Beatrix Potter. Or just enjoy a leisurely drive through beautiful scenery.
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  • Norfolk

    A holiday in Norfolk is not a glamourous break. While the Norfolk Broads of East Anglia are a beautiful part of the UK, they represent a relaxing rural getaway rather than a high-powered city-break. Although its reputation is mostly rural, with people associating the county mostly with the wetlands of the Norfolk Broads, there are also towns such as Norwich and King's Lynn to visit, both of which provide shopping opportunities, nightlife and entertainment. Norfolk also contains a large stretch of coastline, and seaside destinations such as Cromer and Great Yearmouth mean there are great beaches to be found as well. Many areas of the Norfolk Broads and the coastal region are sites of outstanding natural beauty, and are also protected as bird reserves, so take a pair of binoculars on holiday. There are also popular wildlife attractions such as Banham Zoo, with a great collection of big cats, and Great Yarmouth's Sea Life Centre, one of the biggest of its kind in the country, complete with tropical sharks and conger eels. And of course, if any of your family are interested in boating, you'll need to rent a boat and explore the waterways of the Broads themselves!

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  • Cornwall
    Cornwall is the extreme southwestern peninsula of England. It has the longest stretch of continuous coastline in Britain and it is one of the sunniest areas in the UK. With picturesque villages, Celtic ruins, light blue waters, gardens and parks and unique architecture it certainly is among the most scenic areas of England. Home of many events and festivals and the land of Cornish pasty, it is definitely worth visiting.
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  • Maasai Mara National Reserve
    Maybe your local zoo has lions, leopards, zebras or elephants. Maybe they even have wildebeest. But we bet they don't have 1.3 million wildebeest—never mind 1.3 million wildebeest in migration, with predators in hot pursuit. It's one of the most awesome sights in nature, and you can see it at Masai Mara in southwestern Kenya.
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  • North Wales

    The recent trend for staycation holidays means that British people are increasingly rediscovering the natural beauty that lies on their doorstep and North Wales is a ruggedly good example of this. Snowdonia is a region of great natural beauty that is dominated by mountain ranges including the Snowdon mountain from which the region takes its name. The gigantic Snowdonia national park offers visitors hill-walking, mountain climbing, and wildlife watching. Or, if you fancy a change of scenery, you can come down from the mountains to the 200+ miles of coast. There, you’ll find secluded coves and world class beaches such as the five mile long Tywyn beach.

    Sometimes it’s good to take the weight off your feet and the Snowdon Mountain Railway offers a unique opportunity to ride a steam train up to the top of a 3,560 foot mountain, enjoying stunning views along the way. The line has been in operation for over a hundred years and children under the age of 4 go free, making it perfect for families whose kids have a Thomas the Tank Engine fixation!

    One of the great attractions Wales offers tourists is its wealth of historic castles and Caernarfon Castle stands as one of the most imposing relics of a distant time. Built in 1283 by the English King Edward the First, its initial role was to help subdue any thoughts of Welsh rebellion but it now helps Welsh coffers by attracting countless visitors.

    The Isle of Anglesey is an island situated off the north-west Welsh coast but connected to the mainland by two bridges across the Menai Strait. It’s yet another area of great natural beauty and is worth a visit during your North Wales sojourn. As an island, it offers lots for water lovers including sailing, kayaking, surfing, kite surfing, diving, and fishing. Or you can just dip your toes as you enjoy one of Anglesey’s great beaches.

    With kids in mind, make sure you schedule a visit to the Anglesey Sea Zoo. It’s the biggest aquarium in Wales and will bring you face to face with a huge variety of marine species including conger eels, octopus, lobsters, and sharks!

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