Boutique Bed and Breakfast London

THE 10 BEST Boutique Bed and Breakfast London

Boutique Bed and Breakfast London

These charming, stylish abodes come with tons of personality.

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Boutique Bed and Breakfast nearby destinations

  • Brighton
    Londoners have been traveing to Brighton for beach getaways ever since the railway arrived here in 1841. The pebbled beach, Brighton Pier's amusement arcade and the Royal Pavilion are the main sights, but you'll also find hundreds of pubs and clubs catering to an energetic crowd.
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  • Cambridge
    In the city that inspired great minds from Charles Darwin to Stephen Hawking, you'll find one of the world's oldest universities, the 1871 Gothic- revival All Saints Church and the gardens favoured by 17th-century poet John Milton. Cambridge is also home to ADC Theatre, the oldest university playhouse in England. Evenings are perfect for taking in the mix of traditional pubs and contemporary restaurants. Climb the tower of the University's Great St Mary's Church for sweeping views of the city.
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  • Oxford
    In the "city of dreaming spires", academia takes centre stage. Gaze out at Oxford's world-famous colleges from the top of St Mary's Church tower before heading into the city's pedestrian-friendly streets. The University's Botanic Garden and Ashmolean Museum are Britain's oldest. Follow your nose to the Covered Market for the makings of a picnic to enjoy on a punt or in the University Parks. Mix the historic and modern with visits to the 12th- century village church of Iffley and trendy Cowley's ethnic shops and music venues.
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  • Winchester
    Presided over by its cathedral, where Jane Austen is buried, and medieval castle, home to King Arthur’s Round Table; Winchester wears its history on its sleeve. A maze of cobbled lanes and half-timbered buildings harbour old English pubs, traditional cafés, lively markets, and artisan shops.
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  • Surrey
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  • Essex
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  • West Sussex
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  • Kent
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  • Broadstairs
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Popular destinations for Boutique Bed and Breakfast

  • Bath
    Known for its restorative wonders, Bath was once the home of Jane Austen. Sure, you could attempt to conjure up this elegant city by reading Pride and Prejudice in your tub, but as Bath has a lot more history than your bathroom (we assume, anyway) you'd be missing out. A stroll through Bath is like visiting an open-air museum, with roughly 5,000 buildings in the city drawing notice for their architectural merit. After your stroll, soak in the natural hot waters of the Thermae Bath Spa, once a favourite of the Celts and Romans.
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  • Lincoln
    History reigns in Lincoln, where Roman ruins, medieval monuments, and a Norman castle can be found within steps of each other. Even the modern trappings of this student city feel nostalgic—cobbled lanes harbour independent boutiques, cutesy tea rooms hide behind half-timbered façades, and old warehouses are now cool music venues.
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  • Chester
    <p>Chester is a picturesque town on the river Dee in Cheshire, in the North West of England, not too far from Liverpool. Chester has a wide range of activities available to visitors, from simply walking round the compact city centre and shopping to visiting the very visible Roman ruins which are dotted through the town. Particularly impressive is the Roman amphitheatre next to Grosvenor Park, and you can also see a reconstructed hypocaust (Roman underfloor heating, more interesting than it sounds) in the Roman Gardens - and another one in the basement of a Spud U Like restaurant! Chester Racecourse is nearby for the family's gamblers and horse fans, and the more active-minded can try their hand at boating on the River Dee. Chester Cathedral is also well worth a visit, as is Chester Zoo (which might be more to the tastes of the younger members of the family). There are also many brilliant restaurants in Chester, but also a large number of traditional English pubs, many of which serve reasonably priced hot food for meals out. </p>
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  • York
    Just two hours north of London by rail, the city of York holds 1900 years' worth of history in its ancient walls. The Romans built the city in 71 AD, and the Vikings captured it in 866 AD. Stop by the Yorkshire Museum and Gardens for a look at what the Roman and Vikings left behind (they must have packed light when they left). From there, move on to the York Castle Museum for a not-so-quick overview of the most recent 400 years.
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  • Devon
    <div id="VR_GEO_BLURB_TITLE">Devon Cottages - The Ultimate in Relaxing Breaks </div><div id="VR_GEO_BLURB_CONTENT"><p>From the wilds of Dartmoor to the wooded hillsides of the Lyn Valley, Devon is undoubtedly one of England's most beautiful counties. Its overwhelmingly rural landscape means that catered accommodation is restricted to over-subscribed Bed and Breakfasts and hotels which are mostly concentrated in towns like Exeter and Barnstaple. </p><p>Devon is a great location for a family holiday in the great outdoors, with everything from beach resorts at Ilfracombe to rambling in the hills of Exmoor and tors of Dartmoor. It is a large county, but whether you want to follow the Tarka Trail, or walk down the Doone Valley, you can be sure there will be cottages open for holiday rentals nearby. </p><div>Devon's Cottages, All Mod Cons </div><p>Most of Devon's holiday rental cottages started as farm buildings of some sort, and planning restrictions mean that many of them retain their rural charm on the outside. However, the cottages are generally renovated to 21st Century standards inside, with double glazing, TV, washing machines and fully-equipped kitchens. Families are well catered for in the higher end properties with games rooms, sometimes including full-size pool tables and large gardens for children to explore. </p><p>Despite the unpredictability of Devon's weather even during the summer months, the comfort of these properties gives great peace of mind. Moreover, a week's holiday rental of a cottage in Devon can cost as little as £300 - £400. During the peak season you can spend as much as £900 a month for one of the larger or more luxurious cottages, which still works out to be cheaper than a lot of hotels, especially if you have to book several rooms to accommodate a family of four or five. </p><div>Town Mouse or Country Mouse </div><p>To get the best of Devon's startling countryside and its friendly communities, renting a holiday cottage near Lynton and Lynmouth can be a good start. It is a useful base from which to explore North Devon, and is within walking distance of several beauty spots, such as Watersmeet (complete with a small but impressive waterfall) and the Valley of the Rocks. Separated by a steep cliff, you can travel up a funicular railway from coastal Lynmouth to clifftop Lynton, with plenty of stunning walks, shopping opportunities and several beaches and boat trips to nearby coastal attractions. </p><p>The twin villages also boast a concentration of well-equipped holiday cottages, from modest fisherman's cottages on the path to Watersmeet to grander hillside houses on the way to the Valley of the Rocks. Whatever your budget, Lynton and Lynmouth can provide some tempting accommodation options for your first Devon holiday. </p></div>
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  • Scarborough
    Reigned over by a 12th-century castle, the seaside town of Scarborough centres around a pretty, horseshoe-shaped bay lapped by the North Sea. Sandy beaches, surfing opportunities, and hearty Yorkshire fare have made Scarborough a family favourite for more than 400 years.
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  • Lake District
    Cumbria's valleys and fells (as the low mountains are known) are home to idyllic villages, high moorlands and picturesque lakes. Literary buffs will enjoy Wordsworth's Dove Cottage (go in March to see daffodils), and if you've got kids in tow, visit The World of Beatrix Potter. Or just enjoy a leisurely drive through beautiful scenery.
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  • Edinburgh
    Edinburgh is Scotland’s capital city, renowned for its heritage, culture and festivals. Take a long walk around the centre to explore the World Heritage Sites of the Old Town and New Town, as well as all the area’s museums and galleries. Then stop for a delicious meal made from fresh Scottish produce before heading out to take in one of Edinburgh’s many events — including the famous summer festivals of culture, or the Winter Festivals of music, light and ceilidhs.
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  • Dorset
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  • Derbyshire
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