Lossiemouth Pet Friendly Campsites

THE BEST Pet Friendly Campsites in Lossiemouth

Lossiemouth Pet Friendly Campsites

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Pet Friendly Campsites nearby destinations

  • Nairn
    Thanks to its unique micro-climate, Nairn gets more hours of sunshine and less rainfall than other towns just a few miles away. Thankfully, this combination of abundant sun and no rain provide the perfect weather conditions for golf, as Nairn boasts two 18-hole championship courses. (And if you have time on your hands, there are 30 more courses within 60 miles.) Don't miss the town's jazz and film festivals, the latter of which was started by Nairn resident and actress Tilda Swinton (you'd know her if you saw her).
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  • Inverness
    This compact Scottish city is perfect for exploration by foot — travellers can easily find their way from the lovely River Ness to historic Inverness Castle and St. Andrews Cathedral, and beyond to the events at Eden Court and the busy Victorian Market. It’s also an ideal base for exploring the Highlands, with the mysterious Loch Ness (and famed local resident Nessie), Culloden Battlefield and the Bronze Age Clava Cairns just a quick drive away.
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  • Scottish Highlands
    The moody, romantic Scottish Highlands start at Loch Lomond just north of Glasgow. Comprising a slew of mountain ranges, this sparsely populated land is best seen by train on the West Highland Line. Mountains, lochs, bright heather and rhododendrons give way to white sand beaches and rugged coves as the train nears Mallaig. For a more active take on the region, hike the West Highland Way or visit the Trossachs National Park. Ben Nevis, a popular climbing spot, looms over the town of Fort William.
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  • Loch Ness Region
    With depths reaching 700 feet and a length of more than 20 miles, Loch Ness provides plenty of hiding places for its legendary monster. Should you tire of searching for Nessie, this scenic section of the Scottish Highlands also has charming villages like Drumnadrochit and Fort Augustus, open-air Shakespearean productions, multiple golf courses and medieval Urquhart Castle. Wildlife of the non-mythological variety and ancient Caledonian pine forests can be found in the Glen Affric nature reserve.
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  • Pitlochry
    Highland Perthshire places some of Scotland’s most spectacular scenery within easy reach of both Glasgow and Edinburgh, and Pitlochry is the most geared-up base from which to enjoy it. It’s been a bustling mountain resort since the railways arrived in 1863, and these days manages to be both a cozy favourite for tourists who enjoy browsing in its woolen mills and taking in the repertory of plays at its famous Festival Theatre, and a magnet for adrenalin junkies in search of bungee jumping, canyoning, tubing and white water rafting adventures. Visitors of any age will be intrigued by the Pictish carvings on the huge Dunfallandy stone at nearby Ballinluig and, after a bracing mountain walk or visit to the famous salmon ladder, adults can enjoy a warming dram of malt whiskey after a tour at one of the two local distilleries, Edradour and Blair Athol.
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  • Aviemore
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  • Wick
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  • Aberdeenshire
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  • Blair Atholl
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  • Ullapool
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Popular destinations for Pet Friendly Campsites

  • Lake District
    Cumbria's valleys and fells (as the low mountains are known) are home to idyllic villages, high moorlands and picturesque lakes. Literary buffs will enjoy Wordsworth's Dove Cottage (go in March to see daffodils), and if you've got kids in tow, visit The World of Beatrix Potter. Or just enjoy a leisurely drive through beautiful scenery.
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  • Anglesey
    Prehistoric stone markers and monuments dot the landscape of the Isle of Anglesey, serving as stately beacons to visitors. The beaches of Rhosneigr are great for surfing, fishing and diving. The dunes and pebbly shores of Broad Beach span from the village all the way to the Barclodiad y Gawres neolithinc burial chamber. Hauntingly beautiful Beaumaris Gaol will give you chills. Warm up with a pony petting session at Foel Farm Park.
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  • Norfolk

    A holiday in Norfolk is not a glamourous break. While the Norfolk Broads of East Anglia are a beautiful part of the UK, they represent a relaxing rural getaway rather than a high-powered city-break. Although its reputation is mostly rural, with people associating the county mostly with the wetlands of the Norfolk Broads, there are also towns such as Norwich and King's Lynn to visit, both of which provide shopping opportunities, nightlife and entertainment. Norfolk also contains a large stretch of coastline, and seaside destinations such as Cromer and Great Yearmouth mean there are great beaches to be found as well. Many areas of the Norfolk Broads and the coastal region are sites of outstanding natural beauty, and are also protected as bird reserves, so take a pair of binoculars on holiday. There are also popular wildlife attractions such as Banham Zoo, with a great collection of big cats, and Great Yarmouth's Sea Life Centre, one of the biggest of its kind in the country, complete with tropical sharks and conger eels. And of course, if any of your family are interested in boating, you'll need to rent a boat and explore the waterways of the Broads themselves!

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  • Pembrokeshire

    Pembrokeshire, tucked away in South West Wales, is a remote but beautiful corner of the UK, with spectacular coastlines on three sides and gorgeous countryside alongside highly picturesque towns such as Tenby, Fishguard and Haverfordwest. And as if that wasn't enough for a family holiday, it's recently been a filming location for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows!

    Pembrokeshire is a county made for explorers. You can explore the coastline over the traditional paths, or indulge in a little coasteering - the seaside equivalent of free running, only with more swimming - around St David's. St David's is the UK's smallest city, and the cathedral is also well worth a visit while you're drying your socks after the coasteering, and elsewhere there are sights such as the Preseli Hills (where the stones used to build Stonehenge were quarried) and more universally appealing attractions like Oakwood Theme Park, which has rollercoasters and rides and occasional appearances from bands like Girls Aloud. Also, young historians will love the huge number of castles that litter the county in various states of repair, particularly the imposing Pembroke Castle, whose walls sit on top of a site which has been occupied since Roman times.

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  • Devon
    Devon Cottages - The Ultimate in Relaxing Breaks

    From the wilds of Dartmoor to the wooded hillsides of the Lyn Valley, Devon is undoubtedly one of England's most beautiful counties. Its overwhelmingly rural landscape means that catered accommodation is restricted to over-subscribed Bed and Breakfasts and hotels which are mostly concentrated in towns like Exeter and Barnstaple.

    Devon is a great location for a family holiday in the great outdoors, with everything from beach resorts at Ilfracombe to rambling in the hills of Exmoor and tors of Dartmoor. It is a large county, but whether you want to follow the Tarka Trail, or walk down the Doone Valley, you can be sure there will be cottages open for holiday rentals nearby.

    Devon's Cottages, All Mod Cons

    Most of Devon's holiday rental cottages started as farm buildings of some sort, and planning restrictions mean that many of them retain their rural charm on the outside. However, the cottages are generally renovated to 21st Century standards inside, with double glazing, TV, washing machines and fully-equipped kitchens. Families are well catered for in the higher end properties with games rooms, sometimes including full-size pool tables and large gardens for children to explore.

    Despite the unpredictability of Devon's weather even during the summer months, the comfort of these properties gives great peace of mind. Moreover, a week's holiday rental of a cottage in Devon can cost as little as £300 - £400. During the peak season you can spend as much as £900 a month for one of the larger or more luxurious cottages, which still works out to be cheaper than a lot of hotels, especially if you have to book several rooms to accommodate a family of four or five.

    Town Mouse or Country Mouse

    To get the best of Devon's startling countryside and its friendly communities, renting a holiday cottage near Lynton and Lynmouth can be a good start. It is a useful base from which to explore North Devon, and is within walking distance of several beauty spots, such as Watersmeet (complete with a small but impressive waterfall) and the Valley of the Rocks. Separated by a steep cliff, you can travel up a funicular railway from coastal Lynmouth to clifftop Lynton, with plenty of stunning walks, shopping opportunities and several beaches and boat trips to nearby coastal attractions.

    The twin villages also boast a concentration of well-equipped holiday cottages, from modest fisherman's cottages on the path to Watersmeet to grander hillside houses on the way to the Valley of the Rocks. Whatever your budget, Lynton and Lynmouth can provide some tempting accommodation options for your first Devon holiday.

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  • Isle of Wight
    The Isle of Wight is the perfect place to enjoy some peace, quiet and natural beauty. Except perhaps in the summer, when the Isle of Wight Festival draws visitors from all over the world. In 1970, the Festival was the largest rock-music event ever held. It was called Britain's Woodstock and featured Jimi Hendrix and The Who. (Not so much peace or quiet that week.) The island is also known for its world-famous sailing and lovely resorts, where people have been holiday-making since Victorian times.
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  • Newquay
    Catch a wave in Cornwall! Beach, surfing, and scenery draw the crowds to Newquay every summer. Perfect your tan on the beach, paddle in the shallows, or join the surfers out at sea. Just out of town, the Holywell Bay Fun Park, Newquay Zoo, and Blue Reef Aquarium provide family fun, and dedicated cycling tracks offer an alternate way to tour nearby towns of Bodmin, Padstow, and Truro.
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  • Cornwall
    Cornwall is the extreme southwestern peninsula of England. It has the longest stretch of continuous coastline in Britain and it is one of the sunniest areas in the UK. With picturesque villages, Celtic ruins, light blue waters, gardens and parks and unique architecture it certainly is among the most scenic areas of England. Home of many events and festivals and the land of Cornish pasty, it is definitely worth visiting.
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  • Skegness
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47.4 miles from Lossiemouth
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