Spa Hotels in Witheridge

THE BEST Witheridge Spa Hotels

Spa Hotels in Witheridge

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Spa Hotels nearby destinations

  • Devon
    Devon Cottages - The Ultimate in Relaxing Breaks

    From the wilds of Dartmoor to the wooded hillsides of the Lyn Valley, Devon is undoubtedly one of England's most beautiful counties. Its overwhelmingly rural landscape means that catered accommodation is restricted to over-subscribed Bed and Breakfasts and hotels which are mostly concentrated in towns like Exeter and Barnstaple.

    Devon is a great location for a family holiday in the great outdoors, with everything from beach resorts at Ilfracombe to rambling in the hills of Exmoor and tors of Dartmoor. It is a large county, but whether you want to follow the Tarka Trail, or walk down the Doone Valley, you can be sure there will be cottages open for holiday rentals nearby.

    Devon's Cottages, All Mod Cons

    Most of Devon's holiday rental cottages started as farm buildings of some sort, and planning restrictions mean that many of them retain their rural charm on the outside. However, the cottages are generally renovated to 21st Century standards inside, with double glazing, TV, washing machines and fully-equipped kitchens. Families are well catered for in the higher end properties with games rooms, sometimes including full-size pool tables and large gardens for children to explore.

    Despite the unpredictability of Devon's weather even during the summer months, the comfort of these properties gives great peace of mind. Moreover, a week's holiday rental of a cottage in Devon can cost as little as £300 - £400. During the peak season you can spend as much as £900 a month for one of the larger or more luxurious cottages, which still works out to be cheaper than a lot of hotels, especially if you have to book several rooms to accommodate a family of four or five.

    Town Mouse or Country Mouse

    To get the best of Devon's startling countryside and its friendly communities, renting a holiday cottage near Lynton and Lynmouth can be a good start. It is a useful base from which to explore North Devon, and is within walking distance of several beauty spots, such as Watersmeet (complete with a small but impressive waterfall) and the Valley of the Rocks. Separated by a steep cliff, you can travel up a funicular railway from coastal Lynmouth to clifftop Lynton, with plenty of stunning walks, shopping opportunities and several beaches and boat trips to nearby coastal attractions.

    The twin villages also boast a concentration of well-equipped holiday cottages, from modest fisherman's cottages on the path to Watersmeet to grander hillside houses on the way to the Valley of the Rocks. Whatever your budget, Lynton and Lynmouth can provide some tempting accommodation options for your first Devon holiday.

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  • Exeter
    Set against a backdrop of Devon’s rolling hills and rocky coastline, Exeter is the county’s historic showpiece. Roman ruins, medieval buildings, and Georgian façades dot the modern town, contrasting with the quayside pubs and glass-fronted shopping malls.
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  • Cardiff
    The Welsh capital may have begun its life as a Roman fort, but it's since become a bustling city. Where the fort once stood, Cardiff Castle has held court since the 11th century. It remains a central presence in the city, now full of lively art and music venues, hip boutiques, fun bars and modern hotels. Even with so many new and exciting things to see, the National History Museum is still the most visited attraction in Wales. Don't be the only visitor who plays hooky!
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  • Swansea

    Swansea, on the Gower Peninsula in South Wales, is a great family friendly holiday destination. With miles of beaches covered in golden sands, medieval castles, craft shops, rolling hills and world-class museums, there is plenty to do in the area. The city itself is great for kids as the centre is small enough that it is easy to walk around, and quite pedestrian friendly.

    There is so much to do in the area - from exploring the fishing village of Mumbles, to visiting museums such as the National Waterfront Museum (a look at the Industrial Revolution) and the Dylan Thomas Centre. TV fans can have fun spotting filming locations for series such as Doctor Who (Swansea doubled for Victorian Cardiff in 2005 episode The Unquiet Dead). For the more outdoors types, as well as exploring the coastline and countryside on foot, there are also several companies offering boat trips around the coast. The Gower Peninsula was one of the first areas to be designated as a site of outstanding natural beauty in the UK, and as such its woodlands and valleys are well worth exploring, and the area is also home to several parks and nature reserves, including Swansea Vale Nature Reserve - an exciting scarce wetland area which comes complete with bike trails and board walks. Sports fans might not often be excited to see Championship team Swansea City AFC play football at the Liberty Stadium, but Glamorgan County Cricket Club play at St Helen's Stadium. Keen shoppers can also head straight to The Quadrant Centre and Oxford Street for a mixture of chain stores and more independent outlets. Swansea Market, which lies between the two areas, is also the largest market in Wales.

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  • Bristol
    Bristol is a quirky British city with beautiful hilly vistas and plenty of historic sights to explore. Anyone interested in ships will have a blast aboard Brunel’s SS Great Britain, the world’s first great oceanliner, and the Matthew, a replica of the ship upon which John Cabot sailed to America in the 15th century. The graceful Clifton Suspension Bridge is another must-see.
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  • Bath
    Known for its restorative wonders, Bath was once the home of Jane Austen. Sure, you could attempt to conjure up this elegant city by reading Pride and Prejudice in your tub, but as Bath has a lot more history than your bathroom (we assume, anyway) you'd be missing out. A stroll through Bath is like visiting an open-air museum, with roughly 5,000 buildings in the city drawing notice for their architectural merit. After your stroll, soak in the natural hot waters of the Thermae Bath Spa, once a favourite of the Celts and Romans.
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  • Cornwall
    Cornwall is the extreme southwestern peninsula of England. It has the longest stretch of continuous coastline in Britain and it is one of the sunniest areas in the UK. With picturesque villages, Celtic ruins, light blue waters, gardens and parks and unique architecture it certainly is among the most scenic areas of England. Home of many events and festivals and the land of Cornish pasty, it is definitely worth visiting.
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  • Somerset
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  • Dorset
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Popular destinations for Spa Hotels

  • West Midlands
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  • West Sussex
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  • Surrey
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  • North Wales

    The recent trend for staycation holidays means that British people are increasingly rediscovering the natural beauty that lies on their doorstep and North Wales is a ruggedly good example of this. Snowdonia is a region of great natural beauty that is dominated by mountain ranges including the Snowdon mountain from which the region takes its name. The gigantic Snowdonia national park offers visitors hill-walking, mountain climbing, and wildlife watching. Or, if you fancy a change of scenery, you can come down from the mountains to the 200+ miles of coast. There, you’ll find secluded coves and world class beaches such as the five mile long Tywyn beach.

    Sometimes it’s good to take the weight off your feet and the Snowdon Mountain Railway offers a unique opportunity to ride a steam train up to the top of a 3,560 foot mountain, enjoying stunning views along the way. The line has been in operation for over a hundred years and children under the age of 4 go free, making it perfect for families whose kids have a Thomas the Tank Engine fixation!

    One of the great attractions Wales offers tourists is its wealth of historic castles and Caernarfon Castle stands as one of the most imposing relics of a distant time. Built in 1283 by the English King Edward the First, its initial role was to help subdue any thoughts of Welsh rebellion but it now helps Welsh coffers by attracting countless visitors.

    The Isle of Anglesey is an island situated off the north-west Welsh coast but connected to the mainland by two bridges across the Menai Strait. It’s yet another area of great natural beauty and is worth a visit during your North Wales sojourn. As an island, it offers lots for water lovers including sailing, kayaking, surfing, kite surfing, diving, and fishing. Or you can just dip your toes as you enjoy one of Anglesey’s great beaches.

    With kids in mind, make sure you schedule a visit to the Anglesey Sea Zoo. It’s the biggest aquarium in Wales and will bring you face to face with a huge variety of marine species including conger eels, octopus, lobsters, and sharks!

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  • London
    From Shoreditch’s swaggering style to Camden’s punky vibe and chic Portobello Road, London is many worlds in one. The city’s energy means that no two days are the same. Explore royal or historic sites, tick off landmarks from your bucket list, eat and drink in exclusive Michelin-starred restaurants, enjoy a pint in a traditional pub, or get lost down winding cobbled streets and see what you stumble across – when it comes to London, the possibilities are endless.
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  • Derbyshire
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  • Essex
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  • Norfolk

    A holiday in Norfolk is not a glamourous break. While the Norfolk Broads of East Anglia are a beautiful part of the UK, they represent a relaxing rural getaway rather than a high-powered city-break. Although its reputation is mostly rural, with people associating the county mostly with the wetlands of the Norfolk Broads, there are also towns such as Norwich and King's Lynn to visit, both of which provide shopping opportunities, nightlife and entertainment. Norfolk also contains a large stretch of coastline, and seaside destinations such as Cromer and Great Yearmouth mean there are great beaches to be found as well. Many areas of the Norfolk Broads and the coastal region are sites of outstanding natural beauty, and are also protected as bird reserves, so take a pair of binoculars on holiday. There are also popular wildlife attractions such as Banham Zoo, with a great collection of big cats, and Great Yarmouth's Sea Life Centre, one of the biggest of its kind in the country, complete with tropical sharks and conger eels. And of course, if any of your family are interested in boating, you'll need to rent a boat and explore the waterways of the Broads themselves!

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  • Yorkshire
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