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A three fold dilemma!

Southport, Australia
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A three fold dilemma!

My son is arriving back in Oz today from U.K. with a return ticket back to U.K. for after Xmas but is now NOT going to use return portion, do you think the airline "Asiana" would allow me to use his return ticket for a fee? We have the same surname. Also my EU passport has expired so if I did use his return ticket would I be allowed into U.K. on my Oz passport without my return to Oz being prebooked. Even though I was born in London.

If they dont let me would he be in line for a partial refund from the airline? A bit strange but seems a shame to waste the seat. Thanks if anyone can put me straight on this.

Bangkok
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for Bangkok, Air Travel, Thailand
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1. Re: A three fold dilemma!

Hi,

In most all cases airline tickets are NOT outright transferable between parties.. While we think of an airline ticket like a bearer instrument, they are, in effect legal agreements between two specifically named parties.. you as the ticketed passenger and Asiana as the airline.. These agreements usually almost always have language that prohibits you from re-selling or otherwise transferring the ticket (agreement) to another party without Asianas consent.

So, the odds of you using his ticket-- regardless of the nature of relationship-- is going to be near zero..

The specific terms and conditions of your ticket (fare basis), can vary widely from ticket class to ticket class will outline exactly what you can and cannot do, and what the fees, if any, would apply to do so.. In most cases, the more expensive tickets give you more flexibility.. the reverse is also true.

Your best bet, is that either the partial ticket can be surrendered back to Asiana for a stated value-- and that credit is stored by Asiana and used later.. Also, *if* the terms of the ticket allow for it, a partial refund may be permitted (usually with a fee).

If the ticket does not specifically allow for a partial refund, barring some special consideration circumstances that you may present, I doubt Asiana will permit this..

Unless you know what the terms of the ticket is, you need to speak to Asiana directly and see a) what are you allowed to do per your ticket terms, and any fees for doing so, or if necessary, b) what is Asiana will to allow you to do on a purely discretionary basis.

Travel Safe,

Southport, Australia
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2. Re: A three fold dilemma!

Thank you so much for that information.

UK
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3. Re: A three fold dilemma!

One thing to be aware of naej, check how much a single flight is compared to a return. If a single is more expensive than a return, which is not at all uncommon, then if you call them and let them know your son wont be using the return, they may CHARGE the difference to the credit card he used to buy in the first place ! So instead of a refund you'll be worse off. (? is this perhaps why he bought a return in the first place, because it was cheaper than a single?)

Also, the odds that a return portion can be changed to allow an entirely different person to fly is beyond vanishingly small and as close to nil as you'd ever get. As GOPBI says the best you will get is a credit and even then the chances it can be used by someone else, pretty low.

So don't get your hopes up, and be very sure about the relative costs of single / return before alerting the airline that your son will be missing the return.

australia
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4. Re: A three fold dilemma!

>>>>>>If a single is more expensive than a return, which is not at all uncommon, then if you call them and let them know your son wont be using the return, they may CHARGE the difference to the credit card he used to buy in the first place !<<<<<<<<<

Scare tactics again!!

Merchants do not have the right to recharge a persons credit card unless they receive explicit authority from the cardholder to do so in all instances.

Check the terms and conditions of the particular ticket purchased to see what you can and cannot do. Worst case scenario is he will lose the flight

If your son is an Aussie or Aussie resident then no problems. If he is a UK citizen without correct Visa he will be in trouble if he doesn't leave on the stipulated date.

On the other hand have you relinquished your UK citizenship? The rules change if you did, travelling on an Aust passport you would require a Visa stating UK Patriality to go.

To get into the UK without a Visa you would need a current UK passport to prove you are a citizen.

South Pole
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5. Re: A three fold dilemma!

i think u have buckleys of getting anything out of your son's return ticket apart maybe for a small credit. my daughter had a similar situation with SQ. she got a small credit for a future flight. there was never ever any talk of pursuing her for additional money due to the non use of the return.

but to the question of travelling to the UK on your australian passport u do not need a visa if u enter as a tourist and want to stay a maximum of six months. but i would expect as u dont have any ongoing or return ticket there will be questions asked and i fear u may be denied entry esp if they find out about your origins.

and somewhere in the back of my mind there is a question of whether the airline will allow u to board for the trip to the uk with an aus passport and only one way ticket and no visa.

the safe way around this is of course to renew your eu passport or go down the UK ancestry/patriality visa trail with your aus passport.

as for merchants unauthorised charging of credit cards, tell that to the car rental companies.

Edited: 05 December 2010, 04:34
New York City, New...
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for Air Travel
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6. Re: A three fold dilemma!

Scare tactics again!!

Merchants do not have the right to recharge a persons credit card unless they receive explicit authority from the cardholder to do so in all instances.

Check the terms and conditions of the particular ticket purchased to see what you can and cannot do. Worst case scenario is he will lose the flight

________________________

You might want to read that COC, or the Ts and Cs of your next ticket purchase then *wink*

australia
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7. Re: A three fold dilemma!

>>>>>>as for merchants unauthorised charging of credit cards, tell that to the car rental companies.

Read your T & C before you sign it you will see you allow them to do this, especially if you hand over your credit card at pickup...however when it comes to damage you can dispute if there was no sign off at drop off time. Always take pictures of vehicles when you pick it up and if you see something not listed go and have the agent sign off on it before you drive away.

Hang onto your re-fuel docket too

australia
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8. Re: A three fold dilemma!

we always take a picture of the odo showing the fuel gauge at full same goes when picking it up if it doesn't show full.

9. Re: A three fold dilemma!

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