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SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

Melbourne, Australia
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SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

I posted this in Philippines forum yesterday but thought it may be of some interest in TA's air travel forum.

I have never experienced this anywhere else in the world but know from the occasional media report that similar things do occur.

On Sunday along with 93 other passengers I boarded the 0910 Manila NAIA,Philippines (Terninal 4 'Old Domestic') SEAir flight to Tacloban at 0840. Everyone was aboard the Airbus A319 so we departed 20 minutes early at 0850.

However I noticed after 12 or so minutes that we seemed to be circling back on the taxiways to the terminal. A man got up and walked off: I thought that he'd somehow boarded the wrong flight (which would be a security breach, especially since a security guard or airport worker checked our boarding passes on the tarmac as we boarded by either front or rear stairs.

However I was wrong. Apparently one of the two hostesses (the other two were male) had asked the male passenger to turn off his IPod or iPad (I don't know which) more than once and he had declined. As a result he was kicked off, but left without protest. A policeman soon appeared and took the staff member's details.

We spent 15 ninutes or so back at the gate, stayed on the plane.; it departed about 20 minutes late but due to a fast taxiing and slack schedule only arrived Tacloban at 1030, five minutes late.

This is the first time that I've ever left a terminal with a different number of passengers to those who arrived on a flight at a destination.

I gather that there is some debate about whether such devices actually interfere with air navigation equipment.

It would be costly for SEAir, 40 per cent owned by Tiger Airways of Singapore but effectively now controlled by the latter and which started domestic airlines to use up extra fuel during the half hour or so delay.

Bangkok
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1. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

Hi,

At the end of the day, the matter is one that the Philippines' Civil Aviation Authority or CAAP speaks to, and isn't something that Tiger has discretionary over.

If a passenger is non-compliant with a pre-departure safety matter, then unless the CAAP regulations (speaking for a wholly domestic sector) provide for a exemption, then it needs to be remedied before take-off... that's just the way it is..

It IS expensive as taxi costs are very high relative to in-flight operating costs as taxing an aircraft is hugely inefficient-- that's why you see so many carriers use tugs to move aircraft around the ramp-- from terminal to hangar etc-- even though they can be moved using "brake riding" techniques (which is under it's own engine power) they'll still prefer to use a ground tug as that saves far more fuel.

In the end though these added costs are just rolled into their total cost matrix and are a part of the ticket prices you pay.

I've long argued that if you are removed from the aircraft, arrested by authorities and convicted by a competent court of a safety matter, that a part of the court imposed sanctions should be re-paying the carrier for their added costs which are attributable to your actions.

There is and has been for sometime a debate about the safety aspect of passenger devices on the aircraft.. but at the present time, the overwhelming number of countries still ban their use at critical phases of flight..

This does not mean it will remain like that or not.. but does say that in the end it's the regulator who makes that call, and does so based on objective data and with the recognition that it will, and probably remain in place, until such time as it can be proven that it is NOT a safety risk/matter.

Travel Safe,

Melbourne
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2. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

Victorianlad, what amazed me in your post was the fact that the plane actually left the gate early. I don't think I have ever experinced that with any airline.

If the plane only seated 93 passengers, then how early before departure did you start boarding?

australia
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3. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

If the plane only seated 93 passengers, then how early before departure did you start boarding?

If it is free seating, the passengers get on really quickly

Kiama, Australia
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4. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

I love reading stories like this. I wish more airlines would follow this example.

If a passenger does not comply with instructions given by the flight crew then they most definately should be kicked off immediately regardless.

I really wouldn't have a problem if they just opened the door and gave them a slight kick.

Some people just think they are exempt from the rules

Sydney/Melbourne
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5. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

Navy, I've been on several Tiger flights in Australia that have left up to 25 minutes early. If all ticketed passengers have been checked in and boarded then they shut doors and take off.

London, United...
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6. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

Why did he not just switch it off. That's simply nuts.

Melbourne, Australia
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7. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

Vetus, I boarded at 0838.

From observatoon boarding 180 passengers on an Airbus A320 takes 15 minutes or so if only one door is used via an aerobridge. It doesn't seem much slower to use stairs and two doors (front and rear) as the real time wasting seems to be once on board when passengers block the aisle as they place cabin baggage in the overhead bins.

Of course, airline boarding is slow compared to most trains which have at least two sets of doors per carriage for intercity and at least three for suburban: metro trains up to six sets of doors on each side. One of the other slow procedures with a plane is the actual last minute boarding pass checking, as it seems to be a maximum of two staff feeding the boarding passes into the validator.

Manual checking in at departure gates in Australia is slowest of all (when say an Amadeus system fails) and can severly delay aircraft, particularky if the staff cannot count.

In Philippines I have often been on Cebu Pacific planes departing 10 or 12 minutes early: 20 is a new record. Even Philippine Airlines sometimes pull out of Melbourne on the day flight to Manila via Sydney 15 minute early.

Bangkok
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8. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

Hi,

froggyEngland,

"Why did he not just switch it off. That's simply nuts."

==> This "turn it off please" issue, combined with cabin baggage storage issues are, by far, the #1 and #2 issues most common problems you encounter today on the pre-depature side.

n the phone issue side, I subscribe to what I call the 'three strikes' system... Once it's supposed to be off (and we've already announced this), then I'll remind you once (strike one).. If I see you still using it, I'll come and remind you that it's got to be off and that I've given you a safety compliance rule twice (strike two)

Still not off? Now I have the aircraft brought back to the gate, and you removed.. Strike three... and.. I also tell the ground supervisor that if s/he is or will be re-booked that the fees that apply to a ticket change fee be imposed as the genesis to the change is passenger non-compliance matter and not carrier disservice.

Travel Safe,

Italy
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9. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

Good on them, what an idiot, getting removed from a flight because of an IPod.

Amsterdam, The...
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10. Re: SEAir (Tiger Airways): unusual onboard incident

That's very disturbing news.

If all the planes would turn back because apassenger does not comply to the rules, no airplane would ever reach its destination.