We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

British Airways

Kingsbridge, United...
Level Contributor
1 post
6 reviews
Save Topic
British Airways

Just to let you all know. Do not book with this airline if you can avoid it. Thye have just cancelled my family's flights to Dar es Salam for our summer holidays, offered us no help in finding an alternative route. kept hold our hard earned and not inconsiderable amount of money and are completely unconcerned about the fact that I seem to find this poor customer service. They do not care about you and neither does their chief executive who just passes emails onto his "customer service team". AVOID AVOID AVOID.

California
Level Contributor
4,665 posts
43 reviews
Save Reply
101. Re: British Airways

I also agree that it's terrible to be sitting on the tarmac especially without the a/c. In 1991 our BA flight sat on the tarmac at SFO for four hours; there was something wrong with the plane that they had hoped to fix in time. But it wasn't possible. However, to their credit BA were quite good in putting up everyone in the nearby hotels overnight meals included.

102. Re: British Airways

-:- Message from TripAdvisor staff -:-

This post was determined to be inappropriate by the TripAdvisor community and has been removed.

To review the TripAdvisor Forums Posting Guidelines, please follow this link: http://www.tripadvisor.com/pages/forums_posting_guidelines.html

Our staff may also remove posts that do not follow our posting guidelines, and we reserve the right to remove any post for any reason. Thanks for being a part of the TripAdvisor travel community!

Removed on: 04 August 2014, 02:35
London
Level Contributor
2,576 posts
71 reviews
Save Reply
103. Re: British Airways

were forced to sit in the stinking heat

Was it really that hot at 2100?

Phoenix, Arizona
Level Contributor
40,466 posts
1,227 reviews
Save Reply
104. Re: British Airways

A couple of observations:

We are often faced with no assigned gate, at LHR and on UA, usually with flight to SFO, or perhaps LAX. Why it takes so long for a gate assignment to be made, I do not know. It appears that the 772's are serviced elsewhere, then finally brought around to a gate for boarding, but the assignment usually does not appear, until right at the time for boarding. Fortunately, we take the flights often enough, that we can usually guess, within a gate, or two, what our point of departure will be. Not the best situation, but very common with that airport on our UA flights to the USA.

Most AC on an aircraft is provided by a connection to the equipment at the gate. The plane's AC is usually not run, or is barely operative, before it becomes airborne. Sometimes, that ground-based AC is not adequate. We encounter this very often, when flying out of PHX (Phoenix, AZ, USA) and especially in the Summer. There, deplaning pax are asked to pull all shades, to help keep the cabin as cool, as is possible. Now if a plane is serviced elsewhere, in the heat, it could well be that the ground-based AC is either not connected for that process, or perhaps is the culprit, and little time is allowed for another such unit to overcome cabin heat, when the departure gate has been assigned. Result, an overheated cabin.

I do not know exactly how a pax can be lost, but can imagine many possible scenarios. I have been on several flights, where late arriving pax, from another flight, were allowed to board, as the plane was held up. Though it never seems to work in MY favor, when I am running late, it's good for those, who are the recipient of such action.

When a flight has been delayed, for whatever the reason, it can be incumbent on the flight and cabin crews, to be very ready for takeoff, when a slot becomes available. At a busy airport, such as LHR, if a flight has lost its place, for whatever reason, it is tough to fit it into the mix, and when an opening appears, things need to happen quickly. I've been on flights that sat on gate's apron for quite a few minutes, only to have it race forward, to get into its takeoff slot, like the start of an F1 race. In such a situation, the cabin crew has no time to dispense, or collect anything - they are standing by for rapid action and takeoff.

Since we do not fly BA, I have no idea how any of this might, or might not apply, but know much of it, from our experiences on UA, and often at LHR - though about everything, but that danged gate assignment issue, happens at many other airports, both in Europe and the USA.

Just some observations.

Hunt

Portland, Oregon
Destination Expert
for Air Travel
Level Contributor
29,627 posts
6 reviews
Save Reply
105. Re: British Airways

Bill Hunt has just saved me a lot of typing (thanks Hunt) as he covers almost all the reasons why the flight may have been delayed and why a water run may not have been appropriate.

As regards the "lost" passenger, this sounds to me like a no show; someone who has checked in and has a boarding pass but then just doesn't show up for boarding. Ultimately the airline has to make a decision as to when to deny him/her boarding, but when they do they also have to offload that person's checked luggage. That can cause a major delay as the bag has to be located, (on long haul aircraft) the container holding the bag needs to be offloaded, the bag found and removed, the container repacked and reloaded onboard the plane. It could take 10 minutes or much much longer depending on where the bag is. A no show can be a nightmare scenario for an airline regarding a flight delay and is generally outside their control.

A 2.5 hour hold up on a hot plane is never a pleasant experience. I don't want to sound like a Monty Python sketch but I've suffered 4 hours in a similar situation (not BA) only to then have the flight canceled. But ultimately such delays are often outside (or at least partly outside) the airline's control.

Phoenix, Arizona
Level Contributor
40,466 posts
1,227 reviews
Save Reply
106. Re: British Airways

<<A no show can be a nightmare scenario for an airline regarding a flight delay and is generally outside their control.>>

I have sat through almost exactly what you describe. Though no one notified the pax what was happening, I was close enough to the forward galley and jet bridge, to hear some of the discussions. After the GA's searched the plane for the missing pax (assume that announcements were being issued in the terminal and any airline lounge), I saw the container being offloaded, then reloaded. Your scenario is just what I observed.

Now, we had an interesting situation fairly recently, when several pax had missed some connection, due to late arrival of their connecting flight. Our flight had some extra chairs, so I suppose that UA put some onto it, to connect elsewhere in the system. Well, we waited a bit for those pax, then for their luggage to be loaded, then just as we prepared for takeoff, it was announced that the new luggage had put the plane out of balance, so new calculations had to be done. The whole drill added about 1 hour to our arrival, but did not affect us with our connection. I felt good for those pax, already out of schedule, but WAS starting to worry about us.

Wife was on an interesting flight with "missing pax" issues, but of a totally different kind. She was flying the late-night from SFO to PHX. The cockpit announced that they were being diverted to LAX to pick up some stranded pax. They plane arrived, and luggage was loaded, then they sat and waited. After about 15 mins. and after a lot of discussion, it was determined that the pax at LAX had all decided to go shopping, and so would not be flying on that craft. Their luggage had to be offloaded, and the flight commenced with the same folk, who boarded in SFO. No connection, but she did not get home until about 1:30AM.

Lots of stuff can happen in air travel.

Hunt

PS - USBT, you are most welcome.

Belfast, United...
Level Contributor
8,134 posts
15 reviews
Save Reply
107. Re: British Airways

Hi

I had a similar situation with Jet2 at Manchester and it taught me never to get on a plane without a Boots meal deal or similar, complete with bottle of water.

Two and a half hours, it's a joke really. That sort of delay happens countless times every day of the week somewhere in the world.

Jackie

Seattle, Washington
Level Contributor
3 posts
21 reviews
Save Reply
108. Re: British Airways

We just spent $12000 U.S. on Business (2RT fares) on BA for a trip from USA to Europe this Fall.

I was upset to find that upon trying to choose advanced seats, there was a charge of $98US/ pass/segment= $392 extra for advanced seats! Now, we are told to sit by our computers, and 24hrs before flight time, choose a seat online, and HOPE WE GET A SEAT NEXT TO WINDOW OR AISLE....and BA has "middle seats" in Business class, which would be disappointing to get as a possible choice, and last choice available.

This is how you treat passengers!? With a "premium cabin", there's still a charge for seats!!! After this trip, I will not book BA again. On top of it, because you are a foreign-flag carrier, there are charges that US airlines don't charge and pass along to their passengers, thus making a better deal to fly into Europe out of the US on a US carrier.

Shame on you BA for treating passengers in this manner! Change this policy, please!

London
Level Contributor
2,576 posts
71 reviews
Save Reply
109. Re: British Airways

You spent $12k and are quibbling about $400?

If the $400 means so much to you, maybe you should done a little research before buying the ticket?

Ayr, Scotland
Level Contributor
2,674 posts
8 reviews
Save Reply
110. Re: British Airways

Post 108 - If it's a better deal to fly with a US carrier, then why didn't you do that?

Our preference is for the middle pair at the back as it's like a little private area and in these particular seats you don't need to step over anyone and no one needs to step over you. I choose my seats when check in opens and not been disappointed yet.