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Traveling with sleep apnea

Detroit, Michigan
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Traveling with sleep apnea

My father has sleep apnea and sleeps in a recliner. He has wanted to travel, but has difficulty sleeping in hotels. Any suggestions for a solution for a type of travel bed/ chair that he could use? Thanks!

Nowy Sacz, Poland
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1. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

Why does he not get a CPAP system? With mine I can sleep anywhere!

England, United...
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2. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

If your dad doesn't have a CPAP unit, as John in Poland mentions, I suppose you would need to check ahead that any hotel or lodging has a chair/recliner that would be suitable .

Maybe you could investigate getting him a CPAP unit or hiring one if that's possible in your part of the world?

I hope you find a workable solution, and that your dad can get a break that is enjoyable and safe.

Kind regards

Mondial

Edited: 28 September 2013, 22:08
Nowy Sacz, Poland
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3. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

The other - probaby more expensive if he does more than 2-3 trips - is to hire equipment from the local specilalist hire companes, who will deliver, install and collect items for a fee. Hotels will have to agree to work with them, but they ought to have the contacts to make that happen. I;d still go for a coao0 system though, so he can sleep well every night.

Portland, Oregon
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4. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

I use CPAP too. How about an inflatable or portable bed wedge, like this product: http://tinyurl.com/prjy4ue

Search for bed wedge, and I'm sure you'll get many other options.

Happy travels,

Noah

Nowy Sacz, Poland
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5. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

I don't know what prices are in the US, bt in the UK you can buy a complete CPAP system for about £300 - 350.

Las Vegas, NV
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6. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

I found I just could not adjust to my CPAP machine so it was suggested to me to try the TAP3 or aka: Thorton Adjustable Positioner. It repositions my mouth so it corrects the sleep apnea. I went to the dentist and he ordered and fit my TAP3 for me. I have used it for a couple of years now and it works just fine. I especially like it for travel because I do not have to lug the CPAP machine with me. It is just a small case like you would use for a dental plate and I just throw the case into my purse.

Nowy Sacz, Poland
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7. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

Hi Ms Slush. That is interesting. I'd heard people can't adjust to CPAP but I have yo say my first night on CPAP was a revelation and - save for some bad decisions on masls - I've never looked back. The design of the mask can make a huge difference to comfort ond effectiveness - I now use only the fabric dereamweave masks bt I went through some bad times with plastic masks in the past.

I also have a lightweight cpap machine, so ,uggibg it is not exactly a joy, but not a big issue either. I'm going to check out your device, though

Mount Dora, Florida
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for Istanbul
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8. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

Lisa, If your father has true sleep apnea he needs to see a sleep specialist and get a C-Pap. Sleeping in a recliner is not a cure for sleep apnea. He may breath a bit easier, but if he has apnea he will still stop breathing many times during the night. This is the thing about sleep apnea that makes it so physically dangerous. So, you need a better solution, not just for travel, but also for his comfort and health every night.

I used to travel with a business associate who had some weird type of gastric reflux, and she could only sleep in a recliner. Our travel agent always ordered a recliner from a health care store to be delivered to our hotel. My associate's health insurance paid for the rental of the chair. When there was not a health care store available or we could not get a chair, she sat up in bed with a large wedge similar to the link provided by PDXNoah. She did not like this solution as well, but it worked better than nothing. Again, this is really not legitimate treatment for sleep apnea.

I just saw an ad for the TAP3. I asked my dentist about it, and he said he had never heard of it. I am going to do some more investigation. I have grown to absolutely loath my C-Pap. It could be because it is 8 years old, and I do not think it was fitted correctly when I bought it. Every night I have the struggle between wearing it and breathing so I do not wake up with a head ache versus fighting the nose piece all night long. I probably should at least get a new one. In truth I have moved since I saw my sleep specialist and I cannot get a new C-Pap without a prescription. So.....going to find a sleep specialist who knows about the TAP3 and maybe get a more modern C-Pap, maybe with a dreamweave mask.

Is the US the only country that requires a prescription for a C-Pap, and do we have the only sleep doctors that require an official over-night study every 24 months? It is an obnoxious procedure.

I truly hate carrying my C-Pap, and I purchased the most portable unit available. No airline has ever protested when I have two carry-ons, but it is always a mess getting it through TSA, and there are some places in the world where a C-Pap is an exotic machine no one has ever seen before. That really makes clearing security fun. The first year I tended to forget it and would have to return to the plane.

Once, in Antalya Turkey I changed buses to continue to Cirali. I left my C-Pap on the first bus, and I was so sleepy that I did not remember it until an hour had passed. Thank goodness my husband can speak Turkish. We found our bus company in the bus station. My husband explained what had happened. The ticket agent sat me down, ordered tea and said "wait wait". He contacted the driver of my first bus, and the driver of a bus coming in the opposite direction. They met and exchanged my C-Pap and delivered it to me.

None of them had ever seen a C-Pap before, and my husband told them it helped me breath while I was sleeping. I think they thought I might stop breathing at any minute because I have never received such a level of care and concern before, and certainly not in a bus station where no one spoke English.

Nowy Sacz, Poland
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9. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

For ref I know that you can but a cpap machine w/out any prescription here in Poland and in the UK, so I expect the same rules applies throughout the EU. Of course, after diagnosis, your machine will be free or subsidised by your local health scheme - so it's free in the UK.

Once diagnosed, I was not allowed to go home until they gave me a cpap machine, then I was called back a couple pf times over the next couple of years for a night so they could check me over in general and use a more clever machine to monitor my sleep breathing.

I've never had problems with the basic system - only with masks. My first mask was excellent, and I got a new one every few months, so I was happy. Then that model was discontinued and a series of different models followed - some better than others, some bloody awful - until I got an original Sleepweaver ... still the best of the lot, and I include the newer design in the "less good" category!

Get it right - it pays dividends - I'd never go anywere without my cpap.

Erith, Kent
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10. Re: Traveling with sleep apnea

I was diagnosed with sleep apnoea 10 years ago and getting my CPAP machine was definitely the best thing for me. It does take time to get used to the headgear or the nose pillows but the difference it made to my life was amazing. Before I was diagnosed I went to Australia and the flights were horrendous, I was so scared of keeping people awake with my snoring that I forced myself to stay awake! I know that I kept my family awake when we were staying with them too so getting the machine changed my life.

I've not flown long haul since so haven't used it on a plane but without taking it on holiday with me, my husband and I (and the other guests in hotels or apartments) would not get any sleep. Luckily, living in the UK I managed to get my machine through the hospital that diagnosed me, I've had one change of machine and several changes of headgear/masks. Like Johnb121, I wouldn't go anywhere without mine and as you can take it on flights as 2nd hand baggage it makes life so much better.