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kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

Rayleigh, United...
Destination Expert
for Seoul, Rothenburg
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13,286 posts
268 reviews
kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

One of my travelling companions really hates soft boiled eggs, and from my experience some Japanese dishes include a raw egg. A friend tells me that when he visited kiji all the okomomiyaki came with a raw egg on top. I didn't see that when I went there with a Japanese colleague but it's possible he said to the chef not to include the egg. (As I'd been talking about a dish of peas with a raw egg, earlier and saying it wasn't usual for westerners)

Can anyone advice please? does raw egg appear at Kiji? Our Japanese isn't up to more than "tamago nuki kudasai" and that might be deemed rude.

Tokyo, Japan
Level Contributor
24,039 posts
52 reviews
1. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

When cooking okonomiyaki, raw egg is usually mixed with the ingredients, or poured on to the pancake mix to be cooked and have it all bound as a whole. I don't know whether Westerners are all against raw eggs as sometimes eaten in Japan (like with Sukiyaki), but okonomiyaki uses hot plates (and I can't imagine raw egg without being cooked on a hot plate).

I personally don't think it's constructive to go to a restaurant in Britain serving fish and chips and complain that they don't serve sashimi and state that the Japanese would eat fish raw (besides, not all of the Japanese do). I guess you can politely order to have raw eggs out at a sukiyaki restaurant if you want that way though (personally I have never eaten okonomiyaki with raw egg on top in my life- so I don't think you'd have to worry about it at Kiji too much).

Btw, although I understand that it won't comfort your conservative friend, eggs are fresh and kept in immaculate sanitary conditions- that is why it can be eaten raw. I won't eat raw eggs outside Japan.

Edited: 06 March 2017, 11:40
Tokyo, Japan
Level Contributor
24,039 posts
52 reviews
2. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

It seems that a certain type of okonomiyaki, a Suji-yaki (stewed beef sinew) at Kiji uses softer eggs (which looks runny in the picture) on top to keep the spring onions intact with the okonomiyaki. So your friend can avoid that.

https:/…

Edited: 06 March 2017, 11:44
Tokyo, Japan
Level Contributor
24,039 posts
52 reviews
3. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

In comparison, Modern-yaki, a type with yakisoba noodles filled, or Buta-dama (a standard one with pork) doesn't seem to have that runny eggs.

https:/…shoppr

https:/…

Edited: 06 March 2017, 11:46
Rayleigh, United...
Destination Expert
for Seoul, Rothenburg
Level Contributor
13,286 posts
268 reviews
4. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

Thanks for the advice. I can't accept though that by asking here so as to avoid a possible issue I'm being unconstructive. If everyone eats a particular thing with egg on it, then by avoiding that thing we surely avoid a problem.

Perhaps I don't understand.

Tokyo and California
Destination Expert
for Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Shinjuku, Japan
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28,388 posts
69 reviews
5. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

Egg is one of the main ingredients in okonomiyaki. If you order a regular one, egg is usually thoroughly cooked. If you go to one of those cook at the table in front of you place, okomoniyaki mix is served to you and a raw egg is usually right on top of it. But remember that you're going to cook it. If seeing a raw egg grosses your friend, just order it without an egg: Tamago Nashi.

Tokyo and California
Destination Expert
for Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Shinjuku, Japan
Level Contributor
28,388 posts
69 reviews
6. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

Here are some pictures at Kiji main branch. I don't think you have nothing to worry about:

https:/…

Tokyo, Japan
Level Contributor
24,039 posts
52 reviews
7. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

There is not really unconstructive about your question; it's to do with my uneasy feeling upon reading your question, which I don't know how to explain it properly.

1. Bi-polar juxtaposition of the Westerners (who usually don'e eat runny eggs- but what about steak tartare or Bismark pizza?) versus the Orientals (or the Japanese, who all seem to eat raw eggs [except for some that I know?]).

2. Raw eggs aren't usually used for okonomiyaki other than as ingredient mix; the reason why kiji has on suji-yaki is because it's not really okonomiyaki (it would be like calling monja an okonomiyaki). Like sukiyaki, beef tends to be marinated with runny/raw eggs.

3. Good manners in Japan might be eating whatever is offered to you (if you don't seem to like it without having tried it, you might learn to enjoy it, unless you have allergy or similar issues). If you don't runny eggs, and if you definitely don't want to learn how to appreciate it, it's more constructive to have a margherita rather than order a Bismark and ask not to have the egg on it,

Edited: 06 March 2017, 15:52
Tokyo, Japan
Level Contributor
24,039 posts
52 reviews
8. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

On a second thought, perhaps I am wrong. Taking runny egg out (tamago nashi or tamago nuki) for suji-yaki should be possible without fuss. I'm not sure about Oknomiyaki cooked without mixing an egg at the start before cooking on the hot plate though.

Tokyo and California
Destination Expert
for Tokyo, Kyoto, Osaka, Shinjuku, Japan
Level Contributor
28,388 posts
69 reviews
9. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

I am Japanese and I don't eat raw or runny eggs ever. It's perfectly ok not to eat it. When I order dishes that usually come with a raw egg such as sukiyaki and natto, I simply ask "tamogo nashi."

Don't get hung up too much on "Japanese etiquette" as you're the one who's going to eat the dish and you know what you like/dislike.

Rayleigh, United...
Destination Expert
for Seoul, Rothenburg
Level Contributor
13,286 posts
268 reviews
10. Re: kiji okonomiyaki and eggs

Thanks, all.

I too found the menu and pictures and no sign of a wholly raw egg. My aim was to avoid any embarrassment- I do a lot of work in Korea and am well used to eating "unusual" things to avoid embarrassing my work colleagues - and if the standard was "add an egg raw and slurp it down", my idea was to avoid the restaurant. Don't forget I was told that the raw egg was there and was expected to be eaten as it was, and not stirred in for cooking. Which was NOT my experience.!

(As examples of Korean food I have managed were blanket weed as soup with swimming live tiny snails in, fish guts, prawn heads (not the rest !) and fugu sperm (which to a Brit isn't a huge problem as we eat "soft fish roe" without a qualm.)

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