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Malaria In Punta Cana

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St. John's, Canada
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Malaria In Punta Cana

Is there an alert about Malaria being a threat in Punta Cana.We are going Feb 5 th 2013?

Silver Spring...
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1. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

NO, there is not.

St. John's, Canada
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2. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

THanks for your reply

Toronto, Canada
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3. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

If you are asking if there is Malaria in Punta Cana, the answer is yes. Canadian, US and British government travel resources (the ones I consult before I travel) all agree on that. You should take advice from your doctor / travel clinic as to anti-malaria measures, be they tablets, repellents or otherwise.

Montreal, Canada
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4. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

Malaria is present on the border of Haiti. I don't know anyone that takes Malaria pills before they go to Punta Cana.

Edited: 03 January 2013, 23:17
Halifax, Canada
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5. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

Most local residents of Punta Cana, if not all, do not take any malaria meds.

There hasn't been a confirmed case of malaria in Punta Cana for many years.

People need to stop the fear mongering. Discuss it with your Dr, then make an informed decision.

Montreal, Canada
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6. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

No Malaria case since 2008 around Punta Cana .

Toronto, Canada
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7. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

Not sure where 2008 comes from - this data from the World Health Organization is from 2010 and shows cases in Punta Cana, albeit not as high as the Haiti border areas.

who.int/malaria/…profile_dom_en.pdf

This travel health site talks about recent outbreaks in PC on page 4 (and this data is from summer 2012)

iamat.org/pdf/world_malaria_risk_chart.pdf

Halifax, Canada
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8. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

emma.....

None of that info states that there have been recent out-breaks aside from the known ones from back in 2008. In fact, the first link you posted clearly states is covers 2000 to 2015 (not sure where they got their 2015 data...... lol).

I'll say it again, there have been no reported and confirmed cases of Malaria in Punta Cana since 2008.

Happy travels.

Montreal, Canada
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9. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

Hello everyone. My question was to ask if we need Malaria Pills to travel to the Domenican Rebpublic.

I found on the website of Public Health Agency of Canada the following:

Cholera in Dominican Republic: Update

Updated: November 8, 2012

Travel Health Notice

The Dominican Republic shares the island of Hispaniola with the neighbouring country of Haiti, which continues to experience an outbreak of cholera. Cases of cholera have decreased compared to last year, although they continue to be reported in some of the provinces in the Dominican Republic. Recent hurricanes through the Caribbean have increased the risk of diarrheal diseases transmitted through food and water.

The Dominican Republic government continues to investigate, and their response includes epidemiologic investigation, enhanced surveillance, water and sanitation services and public education on cholera. They are also focussing on prompt and appropriate care for those who become infected.

Cholera is an acute intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. People usually become infected from drinking or eating contaminated water or food. It is associated with watery diarrhea and rapid dehydration, which can be life-threatening.

The Public Health Agency of Canada recommends practising safe food and water precautions while in the Dominican Republic.

Recommendations

Consult a doctor, nurse or health care provider, or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.

1.Practise safe food and water precautions

2.Consider getting vaccinated Most travellers are at low risk. Travellers at high risk for cholera (travellers visiting areas of high risk with limited access to clean water and food) may benefit from vaccination and should consult with a health care provider to discuss this option.

3.If you develop severe diarrhea and/or vomiting when you return to CanadaInfants, young children and the elderly and those with underlying health conditions are at greatest risk of dehydration.

Seek medical attention immediately.

Drink fluids and use oral rehydration salts to prevent dehydration.

4.Review travel health recommendations for travel to the Dominican Republic

And

Public Health Agency of Canada

www.publichealth.gc.ca

Links

About Malaria

Sick when travelling?

Sick after travelling?

Vaccines for travel

Avoid mosquito bite

Other Resources

PHAC – Malaria FAQs

CATMAT – Prevent Arthropod Bites

WHO – Malaria Fact Sheet

WHO – Malaria Situation by Country

Travelling this winter? Malaria risk for travellers

Released: November 5, 2012

Travel Health Notice

During the winter season, Canadians may be planning to travel to popular tourist destinations or home to visit family and friends in areas where there may be a risk of malaria.

The Public Health Agency of Canada reminds travellers that malaria transmission occurs in over 100 tropical and subtropical countries around the world.

All travellers are at risk if going to a destination where malaria occurs.

Malaria is a serious and occasionally fatal disease. It is caused by a parasite that is spread to humans by infected mosquitoes. One species of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, can cause very severe illness that sometimes leads to death. There is no vaccine available against malaria.

Reduce your risk of acquiring malaria by following the Agency's recommendations for travellers.

Where is Malaria a Concern?

Globally, there are over 100 countries or areas at risk of malaria transmission.

Malaria risk can change based on season (rainy/dry), location (rural/urban), and altitude.

If travelling to any of these areas, you may be at risk: Most of sub-Saharan Africa and limited areas in Northern Africa (most malaria cases and deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa).

Large areas of South Asia, Southeast Asia, and some parts of East Asia.

Areas in South and Central America as well as the Caribbean, including parts of Mexico, the Dominican Republic and Haiti.

Limited areas in the Middle East, as well as limited parts of Europe.

Papua New Guinea and in parts of other small islands in the Oceania region.

The following table shows regions of risk for malaria among popular Canadian tourist destinations:

Countries with Malaria Risk* in the Top 50 Destinations** among Canadian Travellers (other than the USA)

Country

Risk of Malaria

*Risk of malaria according to: World Health Organization (WHO). International travel and health: Situation as on January 1 2012. Geneva: WHO, 2012 & The Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel (CATMAT). Canadian Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Malaria in International Travellers. Canada Communicable Disease Report (CCDR) vol 35S1, 2009.

** Top 50 destinations among Canadian travellers according to: Statistics Canada. Characteristics of International Travelers: Custom Extraction Commissioned by the Public Health Agency of Canada, 2010.

Argentina

Limited risk in rural areas along the borders with Bolivia and Paraguay.

Bahamas

Risk on Great Exuma Island only.

Brazil

Moderate to high risk in certain areas of the country.

China (mainland)

Risk varies within certain areas of the country and during certain seasons; no risk in urban areas.

Costa Rica

Risk in the province of Limón, mostly in the canton of Matina. No risk in Limón city and little to no risk in other cantons of the country.

Dominican Republic

Risk is highest in the provinces bordering Haiti. There is little to no risk in other areas of the country.

Ecuador

Risk exists below 1500m. Moderate risk in the coastal provinces. No risk in Guayaquil, Quito, other cities of the inter-Andean region and the Galapagos Islands.

Greece

Very limited risk exists from May to October in villages of the Evrotas delta area of Lakonia district. There is no risk in tourist areas.

Guatemala

Risk exists below 1500m and varies within certain areas of the country. No risk in Guatemala City, Antigua or Lake Atitlán.

India

Risk exists throughout the year in the whole country in areas below 2000m.

Jamaica

Very limited risk in Kingston area only.

Malaysia

Risk varies within rural areas of the country. No risk in urban and costal areas.

Mexico

Risk in some rural areas not often visited by travellers. No risk along the United States-Mexico border or in the major resorts along the Pacific and Gulf/Caribbean coasts.

Peru

Risk exists throughout the year within rural areas below 2000m. Highest risk areas include regions of Ayacucho, Junín, Loreto, Madre de Dios, Piura, San Martin and Tumbes.

Philippines

Risk in rural areas and islands below 600m with the exception of several provinces. No risk in Manila and other urban areas, in Bohol Island, Borocay Island, Catanduanes Island and Cebu Island.

South Africa

Risk within certain eastern provinces, including Kruger National Park. No risk in major cities.

South Korea

Limited risk in rural northern areas.

Thailand

Risk in rural areas bordering Cambodia, Laos, and Myanmar (Burma), including the southernmost provinces. No risk in cities (i.e.: Bangkok, Chiang Mai, Pattaya), Samui island and the main tourist resorts of Phuket island.

Turkey

Risk exists from May to October and is limited to the following southeastern provinces: Diyarbakir, Mardin and Sanliurfa. No risk in the main tourist areas in the west and southwest of the country.

Countries with no Malaria Risk* in the Top 50 Destinations** among Canadian Travellers other than the USA)

Countries

*Risk of malaria according to: World Health Organization (WHO). International travel and health: Situation as on January 1 2012. Geneva: WHO, 2012 & The Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel (CATMAT). Canadian Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Malaria in International Travellers. Canada Communicable Disease Report (CCDR) vol 35S1, 2009.

** Top 50 destinations among Canadian travellers according to: Statistics Canada. Characteristics of International Travelers: Custom Extraction Commissioned by the Public Health Agency of Canada, 2010.

Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Bermuda, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt (U.A.R), France, Germany, Hong Kong, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Netherlands Antilles, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Republic of Ireland, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan (R.O.C.), The Netherlands, Trinidad & Tobago, and the United Kingdom.

A complete list of countries (PDF Document) and a map of the areas where malaria transmission occurs are available from the World Health Organization (WHO).

Recommendations

Consult a doctor, nurse or health care provider, or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.

It is recommended that travellers:

1.Protect themselves from mosquito bites especially between dusk and dawn.

2.Discuss the benefits of taking anti-malarial medication with a health care provider before departure:a.Discuss your risks with a health care provider before travel to determine whether to take anti-malarial medication and which one to take.

b.Anti-malarial medication is very effective but is not 100% effective in preventing the disease; therefore, travellers should always follow protective measures to avoid mosquito bites.

c.Recommended anti-malarial medication for regions with risk of malaria can be found at the following: CATMAT – Canadian Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Malaria Among International Travellers.

WHO – Malaria Situation by Country (PDF document) .

3.Know the symptoms of malaria and see a health care provider if they develop.a.Seek medical attention immediately if a fever arises during or after travel (for up to three months or longer) to regions at risk of malaria.

b.Be sure to tell your health care provider that you have travelled to a region where malaria is present.

I guess this answered my own question.and can help others also.

Edited: 10 January 2013, 18:49
Silver Spring...
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10. Re: Malaria In Punta Cana

Thanks for sharing all this. I repeat. For those who don't take the time to read it, there is no real threat of malaria in the D.R. No One who lives here takes any Meds, no one. Brits take them because their insurance says to. Others take them because they choose to.

If you intend to swim/drink/bath/wash clothes/cook in the Rivers of Santo Domingo, San Pedro or near the Haitian border you should protect yourself with every vaccine you can think of. Otherwise you have no worries. The resorts spray the heck out of the grounds and malaria is not a threat. Consult your own Doctor and make your own choice.