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Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

Stamford...
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Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

I am a big fan of Caribbean seafood and Jerk cuisine, so which places are the best? Staying at 7-mile beach but I am renting a car, willing to drive pretty much anywhere where it's safe to go,

Thx

Houston, Texas
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1. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

Rankin's Jerk Centre in Bodden Town is pretty good. I wouldn't suggest making the drive out just for that, but if you're headed toward East End or Rum Point...

I think anywhere on the island is safe to go.

Trophy Club, Texas
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for Cayman Islands
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2. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

I like Ranking Jerk in Bodden Town and Kurts Korner (Conch and Whelk fitters, local fish) in Old Man Bay. Some other spots I'll list as well:

+ East End: Miss Vivine's

+ Pease Bay (just past Bodden Town): Chester's Fish Fry & Jerk, Woods Jerk

+ Bodden Town: Seaside Paradise, Grape Tree Cafe

+ Prospect: BBQ stands near the brewery

+ George Town: Seymour's Jerk Stand

+ West Bay/Seven Mile Beach: Heritage Kitchen

Colorado
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for Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman, Crested Butte, Gunnison
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3. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

+1 for Heritage Kitchen. Fresh, local fish pan-fried to perfection.

Boston, MA
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4. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

We just came back Sunday from our first trip to cayman and I can tell you that the jerk in cayman is not like Jamaican jerk. In cayman, they do not spice it up much like real jerk. In some spits they actually gave us sauce on the side when we ordered jerk pork and jerk chicken. However, the sauce was not what we are used to in Jamaica or other West Indian areas. We ordered oxtail at a couple of places and it did not have any scotch bonnet peppers in it at all. I asked at one restaurant and the chef cut some up for me and mixed it in for a kick!

The food was cooked very well- moist pork and chicken- and soft oxtail. Just not spiced up. The chef at seaside told us that caymanians don't like there food too spicy. That is why she doesn't add the scotch bonnet peppers. She was great as was bobby at seaside. They cooked whatever we wanted just how we wanted it! They went above and beyond for us!

Syracuse, New York
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for Seven Mile Beach, West Bay, Syracuse, Cayman Islands
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5. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

Shame you limited it to jerk and seafood... I got recommended by a local to visit Welly's Cool Spot and had a great Caymanian meal there. caymangoodtaste.com/restaurants_detail.asp… - I don't eat fish or seafood, but I know that the other dishes there were amazing for my tastes.

Reviews are here: tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g147366-d1…

Others have said Champion House, but have heard that it went downhill in quality - haven't heard much recently, though.

Oh and your comment about going "pretty much anywhere it's safe to go" - I have driven around most of the island have have not felt any issue with any place being sketchy.

Colorado
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for Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman, Crested Butte, Gunnison
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6. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

"in cayman, they do not spice it up much like real jerk."

Um, are you talking about one place in particular? I've never been to a single proper jerk pit where sauce was only served on the side and I've never ordered jerk chicken at a sit down restaurant but have my doubts that they serve anything resembling an authentic jerk.

Boston, MA
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7. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

We tried several local jerk places- take out, not sit down. We even tried it from the supermarket hot buffet line. They "appear" to be jerk by looking at them, but when it taste it, it is not Jamaican spicy jerk. Very moist and well cooked- not dry at all.

Colorado
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for Seven Mile Beach, Grand Cayman, Crested Butte, Gunnison
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8. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

Which ones? Though I must admit I'm shocked that the supermarket buffet didn't have good jerk chicken.

Houston, Texas
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215 posts
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9. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

I will say that for the jerk we tried (Rankin's, Chicken! Chicken!, and Wreck Bar -- yes, I know WB has mediocre food, but I liked the jerk) by far the spiciest was at Chicken! Chicken!. Rankin's was good and moist but not nearly as spicy.

That said, you can't eat jerk chicken with live chickens staring at you at C! C!; Rankin's wins there. ;)

Grand Cayman
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for Grand Cayman
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10. Re: Best off-the-beaten path local cuisine restaurants?

Comparing apples and oranges. Jerk is traditionally a Jamaican preparation. Caymanians especially those of Jamaican heritage brought it with them and made it with the ingredients they had available. Just like you wouldn't find corned beef and cabbage in Ireland or pizza in Italy, or Chinese food outside local provinces in China to be like the authentic item, the same is true of jerk. I really get confused why people don't appreciate that the Caribbean Islands are made up of several different countries, with diverse histories, landscapes, seascapes, vegetation etc. I don't know why you would expect a product that Jamaica is famous for to be the same out and about in another country and trying to compare them is like comparing one Grandma's stuffing with another at Thanksgiving even if both are great cooks -- you like the one that are used to best.