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Autumn in Toronto.

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Dubai
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Autumn in Toronto.

This year now it is too late, hence next year my wife and I have decided to visit Toronto to enjoy the fall colors and take some nice pictures there as well as I am into photography.

I am new to this place hence need some help to plan my trip. Could you please suggest me some places I should visit. We plan to stay there for 2 weeks. I would love to stay by a nice lake as well for a night. We would like to have Toronto as our base and do day trips renting a car.

Would 2nd week of October be a good time or should I make it in the 1st week of October ? Please suggest and thanks for your time.

Toronto, Ontario
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1. Re: Autumn in Toronto.

For m'self, I find that the first week of October is usually the better time. By mid-October (as we are just past), the weather can turn pretty suddenly. And that means either way, cold OR warm, but that 7-10 days of riotous glorious colour usually happens in the first half of October. So if the fall colours are your main reason for coming, then that's my take. Do be warned that the Canadian Thanksgiving weekend next year will be October 8, and so there may be a bit of a spike in the hotel costs at that time. (Canadian Thanksgiving is almost a month earlier than the American one. It is a completely different holiday here than in the US.)

You will be able to see the colours in Toronto proper, because Toronto has an amazing green canopy, and tons of parkland, but you will get a better sense of the types of iconic Group of Seven fall landscapes by going outside the city. (Google up Group of Seven; it was a group of painters, mainly landscape, in the early part of the 1900s who blazed the impressionist trail in Canada.) They were doing those paintings up by Georgian Bay, Algonquin Park, Muskoka.

There was a recent thread on this forum by a gent who had moved here who wanted to do some Thanksgiving outings for a similar purpose. Here is a link to that Trip Advisor post: tripadvisor.ca/ShowTopic-g155019-i55-k480020…

Please find the specific thread in there (toward the end) where he posts a wee slide show he made after their visit to Parry Sound, which is a small town up in the areas I noted above. It was a beautiful little show, and I think that thread would give you some good travel ideas.

If you go up that way, there are tons of places to stay in a huge variety of budgets. The Ontario tourism ministry has a fantastic website, Ontario Travel, here:

ontariotravel.net/TCISSegmentsWeb/…

You will find many suggested routes, hotels, things to see and do, etc., in their website. I find it an invaluable resource.

Ontario is a province with an awful lot of lakes; there are NO shortage of lakeside stays to be had, but before we start suggesting those, it might help if you have a little look at what I suggested, and when you have narrowed down the areas a bit to where you are headed, we can then start helping you with more localized and targeted information.

Keep us posted!

Canada
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2. Re: Autumn in Toronto.

Canadian Thanksgiving is actually more like 6 weeks earlier than the U.S. Thanksgiving. In Canada it's celebrated on the second Monday of October, in the U.S. on the fourth Thursday in November. I'm not sure why some people think that it's a totally different holiday in the the U.S. from Canada. In the circle I move in it's certainly a family type occasion similar to Christmas, without the gifts, with turkey or ham or both with all the trimmings. Dinner held on Sunday or Monday or sometimes both to accommodate all the various family members and in-laws. Special services in the churches, resembling the harvest festivals of the "old countries". Family members travel from all over to celebrate.

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3. Re: Autumn in Toronto.

TO SENIOR65,

<< I'm not sure why some people think that it's a totally different holiday in the the U.S. from Canada. In the circle I move in it's certainly a family type occasion similar to Christmas, without the gifts, with turkey or ham or both with all the trimmings. Dinner held on Sunday or Monday or sometimes both to accommodate all the various family members and in-laws. Special services in the churches, resembling the harvest festivals of the "old countries". Family members travel from all over to celebrate. >>

You have answered your own Question here... that is in YOUR Circle... it really is a very different celebration in Canada vs the USA... for the most part what you describe isn't what happens "widely" here at all.

May be common in "some" circles if there is an American connection... or even a bit of a British / Scottish / Irish influence (past generations who were the United Empire Loyalists). But not so much with other cultures.

I would be hard-pressed to ever equate it as a religious occasion in Canada... as it really isn't tied to the church at all here... certainly not like in the USA... (an occasion to "Give Thanks")... and a large portion of our population ... French Canadians don't mark it at all... and many still have strong Catholic roots when it comes to what they regard as "holy holidays"... I have spent my whole life on the Quebec - Ontario Border... and it NEVER was a religious occasion that I recall (certainly not in Catholic families)

Other ethic groups... of which a good portion of Canada is now made up of... don't celebrate it either... and if they do gather for a meal... turkey is not on the menu.

Compared to the USA... we don't have traditions like Parades, Special Sporting Events... or Black Friday to get a head-start on our Christmas Shopping.

I have heard that Thanksgiving is the BIGGEST Holiday in the USA... when most folks get some time off... so they can travel to see family (more so than even Christmas).

Here, Christmas is WAAAAY BIGGER than Thanksgiving... that being our BIGGEST Travel time of the year... lol, heck some kids don't even both here to come home from University on that weekend... as kids tend to enjoy the extra time off to knuckle down and prepare for mid-terms (lol, that or head off to an Oktoberfest Celebration... NOW that can get a lot more attention mid-October than Thanksgiving)

Truly... Thanksgiving really is a non-event for most Canadians.

Cheers!

Wine-4-2

Edited: 23 October 2011, 05:28
Canada
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4. Re: Autumn in Toronto.

Well, you have your experiences and I have mine. I'm assuming that there's enough interest to warrant the fact that it is a holiday in Canada and that it is called Thanksgiving. The supermarkets near me are always packed with people preparing for the "feast" and there are far too many of them for them to all be in my "circle".

When we first arrived in Canada, many moons ago, one of the first traditions to which we were introduced was Thanksgiving. It was certainly a big thing then amongst the Canadians that we got to know and I don't think that any of them were United Empire Loyalists!!!

If, as you say, Thanksgiving is a non event for most Canadians then I feel very sad.

Toronto, Ontario
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5. Re: Autumn in Toronto.

LOL, since I'm the "some people" who said it, perhaps I should clarify my remarks, rather than having others interpret them for me.

In the United States, their Thanksgiving, coming so close to Christmas is often a tradeoff for families between their visits (you get Tksgvg, I get xmas this year) for visiting, etc. As such, it causes some pandemonium in the air travel industry; it is EXTREMELY busy in US airports at that time. Not so here. However, since Ontario has so many major universities and colleges, that holiday IS often the first opportunity for the students to take a little weekend break and come home for a decent meal and some clean laundry LOL.

Because it is so closely tied to the Christmas holiday, the US thanksgiving is also marked with much pageantry and (Christmas) parades and all sorts of great grand excitement, while here in Canada, it often does tend to have more religious overtones. The US one is linked to the pilgrims' crossing, etc., the Canadian one tends to be more geared to the issue of the fall harvest, and native customs. At best, we seem to go hog wild for apple picking.

But the very biggest issue that I had in MY mind when I made MY comment was that the Canadians do not treat Thanksgiving as the gateway for extraordinary Christmas shopping, i.e. Black Friday, THE ultimate shopping weekend in the US. Because we are so much earlier in the season, our holiday tends to be the gateway for Halloween, and pumpkins. There are no giant ads and discounts in all the shops in order to get people to spend great gobs of money on even more electronica that they don't need, or plow thousands of dollars into buying cheesy toys for children that won't last longer than the wrapping.

The 2 sentences dealing with Thanksgiving was simply meant to give the OP a heads up about the local holiday closure during the FALL COLOURS so perhaps we can get this thread back on track to what he is asking about, rather than going any further off topic. Senior65, if I offended you in any way by mentioning there are differences between the way our 2 countries celebrate that holiday, then I apologize for creating such a misinterpretation.

Canada
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6. Re: Autumn in Toronto.

Not offended at all. It's just that I keep reading in this forum that Thanksgiving is no big deal in Canada which is simply not true. It may be a little different from in the U.S. but it is celebrated by thousands of people all across Canada, including in schools and churches, nevertheless.

I agree, let's call this a day and get back on track. Perhaps the O.P. will forgive the diversion.

7. Re: Autumn in Toronto.

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