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Poutine questions

Texas
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Poutine questions

Sounds intriguing. What kind of cheese is used for the curds? Is the poutine as full of fat as it sounds? If so, I will have to bring something to counteract it. Can you order the fries by themselves?

Montreal
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1. Re: Poutine questions

The cheese used is fresh cheese curds, so rather like cheddar, but because it's so fresh, it goes squeak squeak on the teeth -- if it doesn't go squeak, it's not real poutine, although La Paryse makes their poutine with mozzarella and it's pretty darn good.

Yes, poutine is indeed as full of fat as it sounds, and yes, of course you can order just fries if you prefer. You can also order fries and gravy.

Montreal, Canada
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2. Re: Poutine questions

Generally cheddar, sometimes gouda.

Montreal, Canada
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3. Re: Poutine questions

Asking for a poutine without cheese is like asking for a cheeseburger without cheese!!!

Ask for a "Frites-sauce".

Montreal, Canada
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4. Re: Poutine questions

@txtravelgal - Cheddar curds most of the time, sometimes gouda. Don't worry about how it sounds, worry about how it tastes. Do you really think that we have outlawed French Fries? Of course you can just have fries, and they are cheaper too. But that isn't the point. Why pre-judge something that you haven't even tried yet? As one famous TV doctor said, "Life is never enhanced by saying NO". There are a lot of things that are very different in Quebec than elsewhere. That's why people come here. You can get fries everywhere else, why travel all that distance just to have the same old stuff again. You are coming to experience Montreal, then experience it... and don't go back and have to live with regrets later. Try things that you might not get a chance to try elsewhere. No one knows you around here, you can try poutine with impunity. And why you are at it, have some deer, rabbit and maybe some elk. Try a raw milk cheese. Have some full fat yogurt. Eat some ground cherries. If you are here at the right time, you can have a stuffed zucchini flower or fiddle heads. Break out and try and stop worrying about how something sounds... it's not about how it sounds, it's about how it tastes!

Montreal, Canada
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5. Re: Poutine questions

Poutine is basically fries, gravy and cheese curds. I assume by now you know that much.

The cheese curds are generally cheddar or gouda, gouda is rarely used for poutine. The cheese is fresh so it has preserved a lot of it's water. It tastes closer to salty mozzarella.

You can buy cheese curds by themselves at supermarkets or any place that sells cheese.

As for the fries used in poutine: They are just fries. Every place makes them differently. Just like in Texas, you can order fries almost anywhere. Most places that would serve fries (not everywhere) serves poutine. Not everywhere is good. Beware of restaurants that have a prominent "POUTINE" sign in particularly convenient places for a tourist.

The common poutine should cost around 2-3$ (as a side order, more as a full plate). Specialty places that have lots of toppings, like Poutine Ville or La Banquise, might bill you more but that's because it's a large order and that's all they sell.

Edited: 02 September 2011, 14:46
Warrington, Cheshire
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6. Re: Poutine questions

Go to La Banquise - it does the best poutine but you will need a few drinks first haha! The atmosphere is great http://www.restolabanquise.com

Texas
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7. Re: Poutine questions

Thanks so much for the link to La Banquise. It looks wonderful! We Texans love gravy, so it looks like the perfect place for us! Thanks to all of you who have taken the time to share information.

Sherbrooke, Canada
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8. Re: Poutine questions

Be careful, this is addictive (as most foods that are bad for you)!!

Boston and...
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9. Re: Poutine questions

...especially in winter. And cheese curds are "pre-" or "proto-" cheese, before going their next steps to become mature cheeses whose names you know. They're plain, meant to be a foil to the gravy, and to stick to your ribs. You can ask for them most places that make cows' milk cheeses. There's a place that markets cheese curds up front retail in Pike Place Market in Seattle. It's on the east side of the street. But in Montreal and Quebec City, it's in Poutine in many places. If you ask for one curd for a taste, you won't be disappointed, and the proprietor won't mind. Then it will be, "Poutine, sil vous plait!"

Edited: 07 September 2011, 08:13
10. Re: Poutine questions

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