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To Dine or Not to Dine

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Miami, Florida
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To Dine or Not to Dine

Headed to Mont Tremblant from Montreal Monday afternoon on the Galland bus. I'm wondering if going out to eat up there is going to break the bank. Where can I do groceries up there?

Quebec
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1. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

Well if you are taking the Galland bus to the ski resprt your grocery shopping will be limited to the overpriced resort store. Alternatively take the city bus to Tremblant Village and shop at the very good, though small, grocery store there.

As for food, you can eat at lots of places cheaply at the resort, but it will not be fi e dining nor lean cuisine. Poutine, post ski stodge in many varieties, from under $10. A burger and fries for under $15 sit down at the Diable, the Shack or Casey's. Pizza for under $20.

But you are from Florida. I seem to recall that State has massive servings at dirt cheap prices and relatively low taxes. So I imagine you will find dining out comparitively pricey.

My kids often pack a lunch and taking it skiing with them. There is a place to eat packed lunches at the summit, downstairs in the Grand Manitou lodge, or on the north side.

Miami, Florida
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2. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

Tremblant Village grocery, got it. We'll be at the Intrawest.

Yes, very expensive. We've been in Montreal since Thursday night, and restaurant meals are costing a lot more than anticipated.

Thanks for your help!

Quebec
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3. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

The resort also has an additional "resort tax" of 3% on everything you buy too. So that adds up pretty quickly as well.

Barrie, Canada
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4. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

bogwoppit....the resort tax has always annoyed me as it adds to the cost of the visit. Are locals or perhaps resort employees exempt? Last time there I recall a woman at a checkout ahead of me producing a card of some sort that seemed to exempt her from something....and I don't think it was just some discount card.

Quebec
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5. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

Employees get some discounts at certain stores and restaurants, but not an exemption for the resort tax, they each have a card to prove they work there.

There is not reduction for locals for anything. Which is why most locals ski Mont Blanc! Tremblant has greatly reduced the kids/student ski pass pricing in order to compete with ST Sauveur and Mont Blanc, but the cost for adults is so crazy we just don't go en famille. I probably eat at the mountain twice a year now. The resort tax just makes the old village or ST Joivte so much more attractive.

Montreal, Canada
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for Quebec, Montreal, Quebec City, Mont Tremblant, Miami, Miami Beach
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6. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

The old Tremblant village store is a Bonichoix, limited but good selection, nice butcher and, without the "resort tax" the little grocery at the resort is expensive to start with. You have to pay for the location after hall and then add the resort tax!. The only place at the resort where you don't pay the tax scam is at SAQ (liquor store) that has the same prices all over the Province but the booze choice at the Village is not the greatest. Much better in Saint-Jovite.

If you decide to take the municipal bus you will then be able to shop around the Saint-Jovite section. Downtown there is one good supermarket: Métro but also a foodie institution: Bourassa. More or less a cash and carry for restaurateurs but open to everybody and the best prices around and lot of special or gourmet foods. This section of Rue de Saint-Jovite also boast two very inexpensive places sitting side by side that have some food sections at unbeatable prices: Tigre Géant and Dollarama. I really prefer shopping in Rue des Saint-Jovite (large SAQ store too) but there are also three other supermarkets sitting side by side at the entrance of the village, very close to the place where Galland bus stop and where you might be switched to a smaller bus (included in the price) to go to the resort. The last stop of the municipal bus is right smack between the 3 megastores. Of the three Maxi is huge and sells many things beside food while Super C is the place of choice for bargains but often offered in family packages only.

Montreal, Canada
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7. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

Oh at the resort Chez Catherine is specializing in French Breton crêpes and is relatively cheap. In the Saint-Jovite sector L'Escalope is where locals go when celebrating. The menu ir really of the white tablecoths variety but still at lower prices than the resort plus they have a large salad/appetizer bar that everybody loves. Plus they are BYOBs.

Dearborn, Michigan
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8. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

It won't make it easier to pay, but here is a brief explanation about the so-called "resort tax" which applies to everyone and is levied on the purchase price of all goods and services--including lodging--sold in the Tremblant resort.

The fee (known as a "royalty") goes not to government but to the Tremblant Resort (Association de villégiature Tremblant) and is used to supplement the budget for the resort amenities that we take for granted, but which get no taxpayer support: the free shuttle bus services in the resort; the maintenance of the resort village, including landscaping, flowers, Christmas decorations, etc.; the open-air free entertainment throughout the summer, etc. Substantial annual dues also are paid into the association by all of the commercial members and by condo owners in the resort. All of them also pay the royalty whenever they eat, drink or buy anything in the resort.

As a condo owner, I pay Resort Association dues and also pay the 3% royalty on my personal purchases, so I understand how annoying it is, particularly since prices at Tremblant tend to be higher than off-resort restaurants, bars, shops and lodging facilities. Though shops and restaurants in the resort are getting better at it, they still do not give customers much explanation about the royalty (there usually are signs in each establishment, but I find their wording to be unnecessarily vague). The royalty is becoming common throughout major resorts in North America, all of which have the disadvantage of seasonal demand but year-round maintenance costs.

Edited: 25 March 2013, 20:34
Miami, Florida
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9. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

Mission accomplie!!

Checked in around 5 then jumped on the Orange line bus into Saint Jovite. Had a great, inexpensive meal at Maison du Spaghetti then picked up the rest of the week's meals from Subway and Metro. It doesn't get much easier than that.

I'd like to add that I've done quite a bit of traveling, and I must say that everyone we've met in Montreal and so far in Tremblant couldn't have been more cordial and helpful. From bus drivers, hotel clerks, restaurant staff and tour guides to you all in this forum, everyone has been remarkable. My guess is you're all proud of your great country and understand the importance of tourists feeling welcomed. Good on ya! Wish I could say the same about my state.

Edited: 26 March 2013, 01:58
Quebec
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10. Re: To Dine or Not to Dine

Great news, glad you found everything you needed for your trip. I find Quebeckers are very helpful too. Tourism is very important in my region, we like to help people enjoy themselves enough to come back again.