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Brick Lane

Boston...
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Brick Lane

I definitely suggest Brick Lane for the best Indian in London. Brick lane is sort of the center of the Indian community...it is lined with restaurants to pick from. Kind of a different atmosphere...you'll have people from each of the restaurants trying to 'barter' with you as you walk down the street. One may throw in free beers, others may give you free Naan...its up to you to barter for the best deal and pick the restaurant you like best. Certainly a cool experience in itself, and as far as I know the most authentic Indian you can find...and cheap!

Greenwich (London)
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1. Re: Brick Lane

Mostly Bangladeshi, IME, but what's an adjacent country or so to you Canadians? :) (<- big smiley grin)

London
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2. Re: Brick Lane

For a more authentic curry, you should be heading a little further east to New Tayyab or Lahore Kebab Hse. New Tayyab is fab (and cheap as chips)...

London, UK
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3. Re: Brick Lane

You have got to be kidding! You most certainly do NOT get authentic Indian food there! As Curious Orange pointed out, it's a Bengali area, so if you want Bengali food fine. If you want Indian or Pakistani food or a more authentic Indian experience, then try Tooting, Ealing road in Wembley or Southall.

p.s also I don't think it's all that 'cheap' anymore either!

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4. Re: Brick Lane

I'm sorry Springton, but I would have to disagree, there are some nice eating places but Brick Lane has become a bit of a 'tourist trap' IMO.

Curious is correct, most indian restaurants in the U.K. are in fact Bangladeshi and most dishes on the menu are not indian. That's not to say they are not good, I like and eat at my local Bangladeshi as well as indian. But there is a popular misconception.

I'm not an expert, but do eat a lot of indian food and spent a couple of years in india so I'm not just being awkward.

IMO If you want authentic indian food go to Tooting. It's an indian community. There are many fabulous and authentic places to eat, and eat with local indian people. Many are vegetarian.

For Vegy, I'd recommend Kashtori on Tooting High Street. Trust me, carnivores will still love the food in Kashtori!

Stoofer:-)

Brighton, United...
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5. Re: Brick Lane

sorry spingeton, i cant agree with you, in fact the opposite is truth!!.

i was back there a week ago today with some colleagues and again it was rubbish food, rubbish service, and all the "lads" in the street hassling you trying to entice you into their uncles restaurant with the promise of "first beer free" and "25% off your bill" is hassle i could do without frankly.

The food is generally not authentic and not of a high quality. There are much better Indian restaurants in the West-End, but naturally, they're more expensive. You get what you pay for!

For tourist advice i would still recommend going there, if only to experience the atmosphere of the area, but dont go with an expectation of an authentic quality "indian" meal.

And by the way, Brick Lane is not a "sort of centre for the indian community" at all! (Southall in West London is) Brick Lane is predominantley Bangladeshi & Pakistani - a subtle difference actually!)

north-east NJ
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6. Re: Brick Lane

I love Brick Lane, and whenever I'm in London I try to spend a weekend at the City Hotel at the Osborn St. end. It's great on weekends, always something going on & I love browsing thru the market.

If I wanted to take friends for a curry, however, I wouldn't head there. I'd prefer to eat in one of the pubs that dot the area & save the curry for another place & time.

Boston...
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7. Re: Brick Lane

I stand corrected...

That's what you get for trusting the opinions of your British friends! In any case, I like the area and atmosphere. Might not be authentic Indian (might not be Indian at all, I guess...don't know the difference between Bengali and Indian, really...but I'm sure there is one!) but its fine for me!

Didn't mean to start a new thread with that post anyway...whoops

Halifax, NS
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8. Re: Brick Lane

I'm going to correct everyone!! A - springeton is American, not Canadian. B. Bengalis, and their cuisine, are divided between India and Bangladesh, as my Bengali friend from Calcutta would be the first to tell you :D Now, I know that most of the people living and working around Brick Lane are from Bangladesh, but Bengali cuisine is also Indian.

Dunfermline, United...
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9. Re: Brick Lane

Brick Lane was great about 20 years ago when it was as near to authentic 'Indian' food as you could get. In the last few years it has gone a bit Hollywood and whilst it makes the area a bit more colourful, the standard of the food has become homogenised. I don't go there any more as there are better curry houses in the City or as mentioned before, the Lahore Kebab House in Commercial Road although even that has gone a bit up market now.

There is another restaurant off of Alie Street called the Halal which claims to be the oldest curry house in London. The food there is very different to your standard curry houses. When I first visited there in the 70's it was a choice of chicken, prawn or mutton, vindaloo or madras strength only. Not a jalfrezi or pasanda in sight.

Incidentally, 95% of curry houses are run by Bangladeshis or second generation Banglas, particularly from the Sylhet region as apparently they are known for their culinary skills.

I'm now dribbling thinking about a mutton vindaloo, pilao rice, bhindi bhaji and a cold Cobra!

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10. Re: Brick Lane

Bedlace:

Your not correcting me thank you:-)

Bangladesh is a completely different country, Bengali is a language derived from sanskrit. You may have 'a bengali friend' but that

can be indian or Bangladeshi, can apply to either. Mixed cuisine is everywhere - now fashionably called 'fusion'..

This thread was about Indian cuisine, and the comments were that Bangladesh cuisine is not Indian cuisine - there is nothing to correct in that statement.

You just complicate the thread. Though I can understand your

contribution.

With respect,

Stoofer.