We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

souvenir groceries

Denver, CO
Level Contributor
755 posts
7 reviews
Save Topic
souvenir groceries

What typical London food products do you frequent travellers like to bring home with you, as gifts or souvenirs? On my last trip I discovered Millionaire's Shortbread, which is now on my list along with Mr. Kipling's Cherry Bakewell Tarts. (Yes, I know they're "very down-market", as someone on Chowhound pointed out, but we love them and they pack well.) And chocolate. My daughter will probably find room in her suitcase for Brown Sauce and Mushy Peas. I'd love to hear what other travellers like to bring back -- from "junk food" to the more "sophisticated."

Richmond, VA
Level Contributor
1,723 posts
32 reviews
Save Reply
41. Re: souvenir groceries

My list is made of up things that are better quality in England. Marmalade being one, it can be found in the US, but English style marm is really $$$.

Or that I buy and use while I'm there.

Cling film is one of those things. By the time we leave there's still most of a roll left and I don't want to waste it, throw it away or leave our cottage cluttered up with my stuff. And I can always use it back in the US.

Ditto with resealable food storage bags from Tesco, etc, etc.

Tomato paste in a tube can be bought in the US, but it's rather expensive. In the UK the Co-op brand was 99 p.

But also must admit that these items most importantly have a strong souvenir element.

It's nice to be back in the US washing the dishes with Fairy Liquid, using household gloves and sponges bought in the UK. Makes me fee la little bit like I'm there.

Iggy, have brought many a Christmas pudding back, my freezer has been stocked with them at times!

Brisbane, Australia
Level Contributor
186 posts
8 reviews
Save Reply
42. Re: souvenir groceries

Khoffdenver- I'll answer! Twiglets are like chips in a packet shaped like little twigs and they taste like vegemite!

Hula hoops are also chips they look like mini hula hoops and the original taste like potato I guess..but there are different flavours!

Fried egg lollies (we call them lollies in aus, in uk theyre sweets in USA candies I think) yum yum! They're just egg shaped soft lollies but a bit chewier than most.

Thorntons toffee looks like hard toffee but is deliciously soft and chewy!! Won't break the fillings at all!

Fairy liquid is just dishwashing liquid! Haha fairy is just a brand :)

cling film is Australia is called glad wrap in the same way- glad is the brand :)

Denver, CO
Level Contributor
755 posts
7 reviews
Save Reply
43. Re: souvenir groceries

Thanks, Wyfee! I'd say of all the items you describe, I'm most likely to seek out the Thornton's toffee. (It sounds like what we would call caramels. Stickytoffee, is that right?) I'm much more interested in the sweets than the savory snacks.

The fried eggs sound like "gummies" -- like the Haribo gummi bears from Germany?

And I learned what "cling film" was in one of my all-time favorite movies -- The Full Monty.

Vancouver, Canada
Destination Expert
for London
Level Contributor
55,911 posts
15 reviews
Save Reply
44. Re: souvenir groceries

www.thorntons.co.uk You need not visit Sainsbury's to buy Thornton's goods as they have free standing shops as well. Their toffee is very good as is their fudge.

Bigger branches of M&S Simply Food shops and a number of food halls within M&S shops often have a good selection of pre-packed chewy sweets, everything from cola bottles to rhubarb and custard, red and blacks and fried eggs.

I've a bit of a weakness for Cadbury's Mini Rolls, and manage to transport them intact on long haul flights.

Brisbane, Australia
Level Contributor
186 posts
8 reviews
Save Reply
45. Re: souvenir groceries

Ooh they're pretty much like haribo but a bit less chewy! :)

Jacksonville, fl
Level Contributor
327 posts
26 reviews
Save Reply
46. Re: souvenir groceries

English Heinz Ketchup is SSOOOO much better than the US version, unless it has changed in the past 10 years. it is made with real sugar and not fructose and less preservatives...i gave my parents some and they commented that this was the same taste as when they were kids!

Edited: 22 November 2011, 06:02
Nijmegen...
Level Contributor
3,470 posts
52 reviews
Save Reply
47. Re: souvenir groceries

What I missed during my trip in July is browsing in a big supermarket, will defenatily do that in March(there is a big Sainsbury's near a tubestation near mine I believe(West Kensington, supermarket near Gloucester Rd?)).

My faves are Galaxy Minstrels and Batchelor (super) noodles. I've been known to clear out shelves(and then going to shop assistants with 20+ packets to ask if they have any more), but lately I've been getting them through an expatshopping site.

Austin
Level Contributor
62 posts
14 reviews
Save Reply
48. Re: souvenir groceries

I am planning a trip to London in February and I'm planning to take an extra bag to tote all my food stuffs home!

Right now I'm dreaming of M&S Buttermints!! I can't find anything like it in the States. And Walkers Treacle Toffees-- they are really expensive when you can find them here. And tons of Persy the Pig sweets for my friends.

santa clarita, ca.
Level Contributor
106 posts
10 reviews
Save Reply
49. Re: souvenir groceries

When you go home remember to put things in checked baggage. My wife forgot and we had some hand lotion and a jar of preserves confiscated at security at Heathrow. FYI.

Richmond, VA
Level Contributor
1,723 posts
32 reviews
Save Reply
50. Re: souvenir groceries

the thing I crave the most can't be brought back: Magnum ice cream bars.

magnumicecream.com/products/…

I can't decide if double caramel or white chocolate is my favourite.

Magnum is being sold in the US now, but I don't know, they taste a little different.

Don't know if they tweaked the formula a bit to withstand the hot weather in the US. ??