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Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

adelaide
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Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

Can you board the Lonon to Paris Eurostar train anywhere else besides St Pancras? I don't fancy driving our hire car into the centre of London to drop it off before catching the train and was wondering if there are any otherr staion along the route in England

U.S. expats
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31. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

As stated many many times above, the reason why the word "Chunnel" is so unhelpful on a forum here is that it is impossible to know whether the traveler in question wants to travel with a car via Le Tunnel, or by passenger train via Eurostar.

You can't say it is the same as a British person employing a term like "Loo" as that is only one thing.

If someone opens a new thread here today and asks to take the chunnel, we have to find out if they intend to take Eurostar or Le Tunnel. They are two very separate things.

This is about as important as instructing tourists to say Oxford versus Oxford Circus when buying a train ticket.

Ireland
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32. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

Interesting discussion!

I think that raising the 'jumper' v 'sweater' issue is a bit of a red herring. Both terms are, as defined in the relevant UK or US dictionary, the correct term for a woolly garment used to cover the torso! I would, however, see the man-made physical structure which runs under the sea from England to France as a rather different issue. The Channel tunnel exists only in one particular geographic location and it would be normal for the locals to name such structures. Equally, it should be down to the company which runs the train service using the tunnel to name that service. Others may use different slang terms for the tunnel and the Eurostar service but that does not make them factually correct.

Perhaps a slightly better analogy for the 'chunnel' issue is the use of the term 'Ground Zero' on the New York forum. It is quite common for overseas visitors to ask questions relating to 'Ground Zero' on that forum and they are always informed that that term is no longer used by locals (and is considered rather offensive by some) and visitors are asked to use the term ' World Trade Center' site or '9/11 Memorial' as appropriate instead. Equally, anyone referring to the 'metro' on the NY forum is generally told that the underground train network in NYC is known as the 'subway'. It is not for overseas visitors to presume to rename these iconic parts of NY!

By the way, it doesn't surprise me that our old friend Rick Steves uses the word 'Chunnel' since his London guide book uses the wrong term for the traditional British afternoon meal of sandwiches, scones and pastries - he's probably responsible for many of the requests on here for the best place for 'high tea'.

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33. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

So you are saying that we should "correct" English people when they visit the US and use terms such as "lift", "loo", "jumper"?

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That's not a like for like comparison. Yours are examples of words being different in different languages. Chunnel is misleading and confusing because it could mean Eurostar, Le Shuttle or the tunnel itself. Which could lead to wrong answers if used in a question. Therefore it isn't a case of translation, simply that Chunnel doesn't mean anything.

Michigan
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34. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

Well in this case, the OP said "Eurostar Chunnel Train" so I don't think it was ambiguous! Anyway - I don't think anyone meant any offense to either the Chunnel discussion or the "ground zero" discussions. As an American that lives outside of New York, I wouldn't have known to not call it ground zero either and would not have known it was offensive.

I don't see harm in letting people know - hey, by the way, we call it X now.. What I was referring to are the posts where people come off as snarky as if the person should know these things. With people changing names, how is one to keep up with it all?

Really the whole point of communication is for one person to convey a message to another and the other to understand what the first person meant. There is no need to jump on people's cases in case they use the wrong/outdated terminology.

Bucks, UK
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35. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

And the whole point of this thread was to ask a practical question about Eurostar stations, and that has become swamped by a frankly tedious discussion about tunnel nomenclature. Can't you guys get a room?

Michigan
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36. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

lol -

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37. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

Really the whole point of communication is for one person to convey a message to another and the other to understand what the first person meant.

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And if you use the word Chunnel people WON'T understand what is meant . It's not a pedantic point or people fussing, its about helping people get the right answer, as is someone drives to St Pancras expecting to drive onto a Chunnel train they will badly disappointed

Watford
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38. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

Before I book the room (who is providing tea and cake?) I just wanted to say that there were two factual errors in the first two paragraphs of the Rick Steves article and that some of us get rather antsy when the word chunnel is used because we get very frustrated by people using the word who should know better and therefore perpetuating this myth that Brits use the word constantly.

Another one that annoys me is Lake Country instead of Lake District. Again it is people (tour operators, guide books, even tourist boards) who seem not to be concerned with accuracy but marketing. Chunnel and Country sound such quaint British words don't they?!

Michigan
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39. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

"And if you use the word Chunnel people WON'T understand what is meant . It's not a pedantic point or people fussing, its about helping people get the right answer, as is someone drives to St Pancras expecting to drive onto a Chunnel train they will badly disappointed"

Selective reading?

"I don't see harm in letting people know - hey, by the way, we call it X now.. What I was referring to are the posts where people come off as snarky as if the person should know these things. With people changing names, how is one to keep up with it all?"

If someone thinks they need more info to answer a question - they just need to ask. simple.

U.S. expats
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40. Re: Stations for the London to Paris Eurostar Chunnel train

"And if you use the word Chunnel people WON'T understand what is meant . It's not a pedantic point or people fussing, its about helping people get the right answer, as is someone drives to St Pancras expecting to drive onto a Chunnel train they will badly disappointed"

Selective reading?

______________________________

I have no idea what you mean by this. The Eurotunnel is in Folkestone, which is 80 miles away from where a passenger would catch the Eurostar train.

A train passenger coming to Folkestone will be just as disappointed as a car driver arriving at St. Pancras.

This isn't a case of "you say potato I say pot-AH-to"; these are two very different modes of transportation, miles apart, with the term "chunnel" serving to muddy the waters and prohibit travelers from getting the information they need.