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Driving in the U.K.

El Cajon...
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Driving in the U.K.

After being there for two weeks and observing the whole driving on the right side of the road thing, I have decided that either (a) you are all much better drivers than we Americans are or (b) your road system is far superior to ours. Either way, I was really impressed by what I saw on the roads over there. I never saw one close call or any accidents or even a car with a dent from an accident. My compliments to you all.

I was confused by all the car phone businesses I saw though. I can't even remember the last time I saw a car here in the US that had a car phone in it. I assume those businesses must be selling cellular phones.

Tenterden, United...
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41. Re: Driving in the U.K.

"I understand the English generally prefer to have their rural roads left the width they've been for eons"

Gosh! I must remember that when part of my garden is compulsorily purchased by the authorities to widen the single lane outside my house. We are an island and enough land is being grabbed for other things without more to widen roads that may not get that much use.

Lancaster, United...
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42. Re: Driving in the U.K.

There is nothing wrong with the country lanes here in the UK, it's the people driving along them that are the problem.

London & Paris
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43. Re: Driving in the U.K.

Bungle73 (reply #29): "And so are you [talking nonsense]. You think "unloading or loading" means popping into the shops to buy a paper?"

No, of course not. Stopping to buy something isn't "loading" as defined by the traffic laws. But if you'd bought and paid for 50 copies of The Sunday Times, and needed your car to load them into, you could park on a double yellow line to do so. If you haven't got a paper Highway Code to hand, pepperwhitemini kindly provided a link to the online version in reply 25.

Suffolk, United...
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for Cephalonia
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44. Re: Driving in the U.K.

So ........ If I ordered and had paid for a copy of the Sunday Times, then turned up and parked on double lines, opened my boot ("trunk" for our US friends) I could load it into my car legally!

Just being awkward!!

London, England...
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45. Re: Driving in the U.K.

It depends if 'load' is a legally defined term. If not, then what would the courts interpret. I'd speculate that it would have to be something that couldn't otherwise be carried on foot. Therefore, 1 paper would not be a load as you could walk into town, pick up a paper and walk back. However, as per Richard's example, 50 papers would not be able to be carried therefore they would require 'loading' into vehicular transport.

Suffolk, United...
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for Cephalonia
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46. Re: Driving in the U.K.

The Sunday Times is a very heavy newspaper!!!

london
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for Nile River Valley
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47. Re: Driving in the U.K.

I used to think that disabled facilities were ridiculously OTT until I started to have to drive around people who couldn't walk and/ or had dementia. Now I know that without the disabled spaces many people couldn't be taken out of the house at all for social purposes or would have to use ambulances for their frequent medical visits at vast public expense.

In fact, at some hospitals there are not enough disabled spaces. Recently my husband had to drop me and his father off at the hospital and park on the other side of Dorchester and walk back. The parking situation meant we needed two able bodied persons. Now multiply this by the number of frail elderly people in the country. Better parking at hospitals would save uncounted millions of tax.

Bucks, UK
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48. Re: Driving in the U.K.

Bajablonde - some people drive too quickly on 6-lane highways - a guy was convicted this week of driving at 163mph on the M6 motorway - that's 93mph more than the limit.

The fact that some idiots drive too quickly doesn't make the roads unsafe - if you're approaching a blind bend on a single-track road you (a) need to drive at an appropriate speed and (b) toot your horn so anyone around the bend knows your coming - this is indeed the only circumstance when you can legally use the horn - to warn someone of your approach.

Single-track roads are no more dangerous than they have ever been and modern cars in fact make them safer because they can stop more quickly - I would rather meet a modern car travelling at speed on a single-lane highway than a Model T Ford or a carriage and four at a canter.

So - nothing wrong with the roads - just some drivers - the same drivers who will drive too fast whichever road they are on.

TX
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49. Re: Driving in the U.K.

PoolLounger, thank you for your thoughtful post. I understand your points, and yes - I do use my "hooter" when rounding those sharp, blind turns.

50. Re: Driving in the U.K.

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