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Victoria Cake - ???

Michigan
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Victoria Cake - ???

Last time we were in London, we had cake - a white sponge cake with jam and powdered sugar and if I can recall, it was called Victoria or Queen Victoria - is that right?

We will be back in London in a few weeks and I would love to have it again - any suggestions on a good place (bakery or restaurant) in London where I would get this - also the recipe.

Just YUMMY!!! :-)

Boston...
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31. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

Yellow cake is just plain boxed cake mix referred to earlier. After making your own I doubt you would enjoy yellow cake. It frequently tastes over - buttered and waxy and I find, no matter what brand, has a distinct aftertaste.

We rented a farmhouse in Cornwall once and the owner had a lovely sponge waiting for us on arrival. It was scrumptious and I took the recipe, but it has never come out right here.

Thanks for posting your all your sponge secrets!

London
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32. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

"Does anyone know where to get good jams/custards? "...

Can I suggest a visit to "Tea & Tattle" especially if you visit the British Museum. They do a great afternoon tea (the cake is good, the scones better!) and they have lovely different jams which you can have as part of the afternoon tea & then buy afterwards.

http://www.apandtea.co.uk/tearoom.html

London, United...
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33. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

Thanks for the info TP and flannan. I've never had reason to buy butter in the states so it didn't occur to me about being packaged differently. I'd seen sticks of butter referred to in recipies and figured out was just some sort of special American brand thing. Yellow cake is a disappointment to me. Was going out was done sorry of rich madeira cake or something. Now crossed of the list as Sainsburys so a basics instant sponge mix for about 25p

London, United...
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34. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

Re: jam -- there is a lovely stall at Borough Market that has all kinds of London-made jams including damson and strawberry-vanilla.

Re: custard -- my OH loves custard and is more than happy with the kind you can buy in tetrapaks at any supermarket. These should be robust enough for international travel. He says that the custard sold in the chiller section is nicer, but the shelf-stable kind will do in a pinch.

Re: German chocolate cake, I had thought (and wikipedia backs me up) that this was related to the Baker's brand "German chocolate", which is a type of baking chocolate. According to wikipedia, German chocolate is named after a Mr German, who invented the process, and therefore has nothing to do with Germany (except for the fact that Mr German's family probably came from there at some point).

Re: Victoria Sponge tasting like wedding cake, most wedding cakes in the UK are fruitcakes (yes, like Christmas fruitcakes).

Honestly, I don't think there's enough difference between British and American flour to warrant bringing some back from the UK. In the information TP posted, the protein content of American all purpose flour and British plain overlaps, so you might wind up with a batch of plain flour that was indistinguishable from all purpose flour and have carried several extra pounds of weight for no good reason.

London, United...
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35. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

Thank you for the recommendation. It sounds so delicious that I must try it for myself.

London
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36. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

"Victoria Sponge tasting like wedding cake, most wedding cakes in the UK are fruitcakes"

Does it follow that the tradition of keeping the uppermost layer of the wedding cake to serve as the christening cake for the couple's first child does not pertain in the USA?

Michigan
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37. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

Most wedding cakes in the US are white cake with white buttercream icing, though you can get flavored or colored cakes as well and fondent is also popular for icing.

Traditionally, we same the top tier, freezing it, for the first year anniversary. However, the cakes are usually dried out and taste like whatever was in your freezer for one year, so most bakeries will include a small cake to be ordered and picked up from the bakery 1 year from your wedding day, with your original wedding cake order.

London
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38. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

Interesting. Of course, the tradition surrounding the christening of the first child is now more or less defunct, given developments in birth control, sexual behaviour, and religious practice.

Cleveland, Ohio
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39. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

I've made many cakes from scratch and have found an easy substitute for cake flour when you only have all-purpose. For each cup of flour in the recipe, remove 2 tablespoons of the all-purpose flour and replace with 2 tablespoons of corn starch. This makes a much lighter flour, especially if you sift it, and I have been very happy with the cakes I've made this way.

When we were in England I bought a mix to make a cake there, and it was labeled "Victoria sponge." I had never heard of Victoria cake before that. Will have to try the recipe posted here!

Michigan
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40. Re: Victoria Cake - ???

This is true, the cake may end up frozen for quite a while. In the US, they have even been on a cupcake fad(I believe you call them fairy cakes), so I am not sure what they do then. But I have seen weddings where they make a few hundred cup cakes - it just doesn't seem the same a wedding cake.

My friend married a man from England in the US, and we all had a dessert during the reception and they said it was English custom to serve the cake and send it home with guest in a small cake box. It was nice, because then you had a cake for later.