We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

Toronto, ONT
Level Contributor
168 posts
27 reviews
Save Topic
high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

Are there places that serve high tea, which I've read is kind of a light dinner, or is it more served at home?

London, UK
Level Contributor
7,040 posts
209 reviews
Save Reply
31. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

When I was a kid, in deepest Sussex, our main meal of he day was called dinner. This was usually in the middle of the day. However, if for some reason the main meal was going to be in the evening then we called the lighter mid-day meal lunch. It may sound illogical b ut it seemed to work. Usually the early evening meal was tea and anything eaten after that, by adults after the children were in bed, was supper. As to high tea, I think that this must contain a savoury dish, eaten with a knife and fork, followed by the availability of bread and butter with jam or whatever and cake. The first course could be cold such as cold meat or fish with salad (does anyone remember canned pink salmon?) or hot such as welsh rarebit. It is the sort of meal that is served on a Sunday if you have visitors who have to leave, say, between 6.00 and 7.00pm and who would not get home for several hours. In the days when trains had dining cars, they served high tea if the train left between about 4 and 6 and dinner if it left later.

Nottingham, United...
Level Contributor
3,362 posts
145 reviews
Save Reply
32. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

teacher91, re the supper term there really isn't a concrete answer as to who uses it. It can apply to so called "upper crust" people or those that think they are but it mainly applies to which region of England that you live. I would say Southerners are more likely to use the term than Midlanders or Northerners. It is just the way we are with our regional differences. That is what makes English people so interesting with odd little varied ways.:-)

There is another one regarding inviting people for a drink in the daytime. If it was a morning invitation then you would be asked for coffee. In the afternoon you would be asked for tea. Obviously it is not a tradition set in stone because some people don't like tea or vice versa. I have never been asked for morning tea though. It just sounds odd somehow.

The definition of a chip buttie with the cheap white sliced bread is the one I would have given you. The best ones are those that you make at home.:-)

Nottingham, United...
Level Contributor
3,362 posts
145 reviews
Save Reply
33. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

Yes, I can remember tinned pink salmon with salad on a Sunday teatime followed by tinned fruit and carnation milk. Either that or tinned Nestle cream.

We went upmarket for tea on Christmas Day. That was the time for tinned medium red salmon and the dessert was homemade trifle with "real" cream. What a treat was that!:-)

UK
Destination Expert
for Chester
Level Contributor
3,718 posts
16 reviews
Save Reply
34. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

Ahhh carnation milk on tinned fruit! When I mentioned that delicacy to American friends they were completely bemused. For them Carnation milk was solely for diluting to then use as normal milk.

To this day I prefer Carnation to fresh cream on fruit. Much more taste.

Essex
Level Contributor
27,965 posts
69 reviews
Save Reply
35. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

High Tea is nit the same thing as Afternoon Tea,

Do not muddle them.

The Hotels/establishments serving both, serve both.

They are not calling all forms of Tea "High Tea" just to fool travellers from overseas.

I used to get more involved on the debate/argument about "what to call what" on TA, than I can be bothered to these days. The fact that the lovely Savoy offers both options, albeit in their own inimitable way, is enough for me.

However, the inaccuracies that others on this thread are perpetuating, are just plain wrong.

Educate yourselves properly folks!!

Right, now I am off to make the cup that cheers....

Hampshire, England.
Level Contributor
3,791 posts
11 reviews
Save Reply
36. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

Apparently there is a place in Greenwich that is advertising afternoon tea as "high tea".

Essex
Level Contributor
27,965 posts
69 reviews
Save Reply
37. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

Silly so and so's!

Level Contributor
3,229 posts
35 reviews
Save Reply
38. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

Ah, Carnation milk! Proustian! We called it "vappy", short for evaporated milk. The way it curdled in the syrup of the tinned mandarin segments...

Then there was celery in a glass jug, triangular soft cheese segments - and if we'd had pork or beef for our Sunday dinner, there was dripping on toast.

Nottingham, United...
Level Contributor
3,362 posts
145 reviews
Save Reply
39. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

Carnation mixed 50/50 with ordinary milk makes good custard.

I will freely admit that I still love cheese triangles even now.:-)

Vancouver, Canada
Destination Expert
for London
Level Contributor
55,900 posts
15 reviews
Save Reply
40. Re: high tea in London (NOT afternoon tea)

Carnation milk has that odd slightly cooked taste that one either likes or dislikes; I worked with a chap who loved it in his coffee as that was all they had when he worked on fishing boats. It certainly has its uses in cooking as it adds a certain smooth texture and pleasant mouthfeel to sweet and savoury creamy or custardy dishes.

poynders's post 29 asked about chia v quinoa, with the former rather nicer than the latter. Chia isn't a grain but a seed, packed with Omega-3 fatty acids (great for reducing the serum triglycerides that are a result of devouring chip butties) that one can add to all sorts of dishes; a spoonful will give biscuits a nice crisp texture.

Now, where *are* the biscuits.....