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Stupid pronunciation question

San Diego...
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Stupid pronunciation question

Years ago I was in Britain and I was travelling to the town of Derby. At the train station I asked for tickets to Derby, pronouncing it with an "er". The ticket agent looked at me with great distain and said " do you mean DARBY? Silly me not to realize D-e-r-b-y would be pronounced with an "ar" not "er".........

I will be staying in London soon, and the nearest tube station to my hotel is Goodge St. Not wanting to commit a touristic faux pas, how is this name pronounced?

Is this pronounced like the word good, gawd, or god, or something else.

Thanks for helping out this linquistically challenged American...

Vancouver, Canada
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1. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

To make your life easier, it's pronounced as it's spelled - the 'oo' is as in ooh, that's a good one! - or as in food.

Seriously, though, there aren't any stupid questions - just the eternal search for knowledge. You can impress Ms Featherstonehaugh when you meet her by saying 'good day, Ms Fanshaw', too.

Hope your trip will be fab.

Halifax, NS
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2. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

Goodge is okay, but Leicester, as in Square, is pronounced 'Lester' and Beauchamp Place, one of my favouriter window shopping streets, is pronounced 'Beecham'. For most (all?) of the names ending in 'wick', as in Chiswick Park tube and Warwick Ave. tube or Warwick Castle, you don't pronounce the 'w'. So it's Chisick, and Warick

the big blue marble
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3. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

So, how would you pronounce this name? McCaughrean.

Vancouver, Canada
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4. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

Phread, is it McCoin? Possibly McCairn (very soft on the r) or McCann?

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5. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

Just to add another one........Is Slough pronounced as in

1. bOUGH 2. cOUGH 3.thrOUGH 4. shOW 5. tOUGH ??

warrensburg,MO
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6. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

Slough as in Bough. I then spent awhile thinking of another English place name that had an "ough" ending but would be pronounced differently and after avoiding my wife and dodging various household chores to complete my mission I came up with Wildboar Clough in the Peak District. Pronounced CLUFF.

There is also a Brough up in Cumbria which I think is BRUFF like in the popular Brough Superior motorbike, an example of which Lawrence of Arabia was riding when he was killed.

Ottawa, ON
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7. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

Slough

1st verse

Come, friendly bombs, and fall on Slough

It isn't fit for humans now,

There isn't grass to graze a cow

Swarm over, Death!

10th verse

Come, friendly bombs, and fall on Slough

To get it ready for the plough.

The cabbages are coming now;

The earth exhales.

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8. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

Thanks .What a confusing language we have. Apparently Slough is not a pretty place-that is the impression I got from the poem!

London, United...
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9. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

yep you are sure right there, slough is a very unpretty place!!

Guildford, United...
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10. Re: Stupid pronunciation question

English people have the same problem with Irish names. There is a place in Co Antrim spelt Ahoghill. Not unreasonably, the English usually pronounce this as A-hog-hill but, to the locals, it starts with A and ends with ill but the middle part sounds like someone clearing phlegm from their throat. English people find this sound, as in lough, to be impossible but the Germans have something similar in their own language so do not find any difficulty.

There are problems even within England. When I lived in Cornwall I heard someone from 'up country' (anywhere in England outside Cornwall) pronounce Launceston as it sounds. I explained to him that the correct pronounciation was Launston but a Cornish friend, overhearing, said, 'No taint, tis Lanson.'

My father, an Ulsterman who served for 18 years in the Royal Air Force, and knew the pronounciation of every English place name, resolutely pronounced Derby as Derby until his dying day!