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Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

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ocean isle beach
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Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

We have one day in Paris from London. There will be three of us, my mother (73, slight mobility issues), myself (47), and daughter (24, Type 1 diabetic) My plan is cab from train station to Notre Dame Cathedral, cab to the Trocedero, walk to Eiffel Tower, cab to the Orangerie Musuem, walk down the Rue de Rivolli to catch cab to train station for return. I have read and seen on maps that the major metro stops should have a taxi rank which is where I would get cabs from. I am trying to avoid metro and public bus if I can but will have a bus map just in case. Are cabs easy to get? I also would like an area to walk for shopping and eating around those attractions. I am unsure if the area between the Orangerie and the taxi rank near the Louvre is a good shopping and eating area.We need access to bathrooms (for obv reason and insulin breaks) and food (again for obv reason and if needed for quick drops in sugar) Thanks so much.

New Hampshire
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1. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

Yes, there's a taxi stand at nearly every metro station, but the sign might not be visible from wherever you're standing as they're often around the corner or on a nearby side street.

If you're going to rely on taxis, it's best to identify the exact locations of the stands you'll need ahead of time, so you're not wandering all over looking for the signs.

Or, just have a map along with the exact locations annotated, such as the Hallwag CityFlash Paris foldup map.

At those places, you'll have no problem getting a taxi at a stand.

There's also plenty of shopping, cafés, dining, in the vicinity of those places, except Musée de l'Orangerie.

There are many hotels along rue de Rivoli with taxi stands nearly every corner along that stretch. Note that rue de Rivoli is one way the opposite direction of Gare du Nord, and most of the streets in the area are one-way, so the route to the station may "seem" a bit roundabout.

Victoria, Canada
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2. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

oibnc,, you need to find a taxi stand map, they have them online,, google,, taxis will not stop for you if they are within a certain distance of a taxi stand( against the law ) so sometimes people waste alot of time trying to wave down taxis that appear to be ignoring them( because they aren't aware a taxi stand may just be around the corner or up the street) . Taxis will do street pick ups though, if location is legal.. but remember to look at the roof light,, I can't remember which light means taxi is free, but there is a system..obviously not all emtpy cabs are free, so its good to know the system. I looked all this up years ago,, there are tons of good sites online to look up particulars, even fare calculators.

the big blue marble
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3. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

You need to be aware that your itinerary includes a lot of walking.

Paris, France
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4. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

Taxi availability often depends upon the weather.

New Hampshire
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5. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

I wouldn't say there's a "lot" of walking, but from Trocadero to the Eiffel Tower and from Musée de l'Orangerie to rue de Rivoli is much farther than you would presume by looking at a map. So, much depends on what you mean by "slight mobility issues".

ocean isle beach
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6. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

Using the same sights, cathedral, tower, and musuem, what route would anyone suggest that would be easier?

Val-de-Marne, France
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7. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

And walking from the Trocadero to the Eiffel Tower involves walking downhill and walking down some stairs. Nothing big but can be difficult for those with knee problems.

ocean isle beach
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8. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

I don't mind slowing it down and I know you can't do it all in one day.

Paris, France
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9. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

There may be a few occasions where the metro would be the wise choice. Don't refuse to take it just out of principle.

New Hampshire
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10. Re: Same Question Put in a Different Way.....

I would choose bus versus metro. There are always stairs involved in the metro and, usually, long walks, particularly in the larger stations. And, you never know when the only way out will be a double staircase or escalator that's not operating.

You may want to consider a museum other than Musée de l'Orangerie which is just not that close (for anyone with mobility issues) to any metro station, bus stop, or taxi stand. How about Musée d'Orsay?