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French liqueurs

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French liqueurs

while is Paris I will be shopping for a silent auction back home. I don't know anything about spirits but saw that Monopeix has a good selection of French Liqueurs. I don't have much of a budget so any thoughts on what to get for the French Wow factor?

Paris, France
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for Paris, Loire Valley
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1. Re: French liqueurs

What does "not much of a budget" mean in euros?

French liqueurs are not generally cheap and can be based upon almost any fruit, such as raspberry for Chambord, orange for Cointreau/Grand Marnier or blend such as Benedictine. The list is almost endless.

It would be somewhat helpful if you could add in what country you reside in your profile, it would give "back home" some relevancy. One liqueur which I enjoy is Mandarine Napoléon. Made in Belgium from aged cognac, mandarin orange peel, herbs and spices, I have never found it in the USA, which does not mean it is not available, but it may be more exclusive than say Triple sec.

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2. Re: French liqueurs

€50.00 is my budget and I live in California so looking for something I can't get easily at home. hope that helps.

New Hampshire
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for Paris
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3. Re: French liqueurs

Where do you live?

The prices for liquers produced in France are lower than in Paris or even the duty free shops.

So, obviously, you would want to check local prices ahead of your trip.

You would also want to consider how you'd get those heavy glass bottles home.

<<One liqueur which I enjoy is Mandarine Napoléon. Made in Belgium from aged cognac, mandarin orange peel, herbs and spices, I have never found it in the USA>>

I'm always amazed at what's available locally, so I'm going to see if I can find that one.

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4. Re: French liqueurs

€50.00 is my budget and I live in California so looking for something I can't get easily at home. hope that helps. sarastro, do not know how to go to my profile to add where I live.

New Hampshire
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for Paris
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5. Re: French liqueurs

Again, you'd want to know what is available at home to know what is not when you go shopping.

Vancouver, Canada
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6. Re: French liqueurs

If you can find it in Paris look for Marc from the Champagne region.

the big blue marble
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7. Re: French liqueurs

There is a liquer called Saint Germain that has a really gorg, trés chic bottle and it would make for a very Paris souvenir if you can't get it CA. Here is a list of recipes for SG cocktails.

http://www.stgermain.fr/cocktails.php

Paris
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8. Re: French liqueurs

Absinthe is usually considered "typically" French, even though some brands are Swiss. As you may know, it used to be banned, but is now legal again, thanks to a new formula. BTW, you might get a better liquor selection at your local caviste (and he might be able to advise you, if you two can communicate), or at a Nicolas. Contrary to what this board might suggest, Monoprix is not the alpha and omega of Paris grocery shopping.

Denmark, Europe
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9. Re: French liqueurs

How about different flavours of Eau de Vie (pear, raspberry, plum etc) ?

I think you should be able to get them in small bottles.

Paris, France
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10. Re: French liqueurs

Among the eaux de vie, I am under the impression the Mirabelle one (from Lorraine region) is one of the most difficult to find outside France. It can also be noted that this region (Alsace + Moselle) still enjoys some special legislation when it comes to making country booze (a.k.a "bouilleurs de cru" in French), and you can find pretty funny stuff out there (I once had potato alcohol at 85° in a small farm).