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French liqueurs

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French liqueurs

while is Paris I will be shopping for a silent auction back home. I don't know anything about spirits but saw that Monopeix has a good selection of French Liqueurs. I don't have much of a budget so any thoughts on what to get for the French Wow factor?

Tampa, Florida
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11. Re: French liqueurs

Yowza. I think Americans would call that moonshine.

(made from potatoes would, I think, qualify it as Vodka)

Paris, France
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12. Re: French liqueurs

Funniest alcohol in my book still remains feni, the cashewnut liquor found in Goa. Seems more than half liter can leave you blind (good luck to drink more than 5 cc anyway; this stuff is very potent).

And then there are all the "country liquors" made from battery liquid among others, unfortunately frequently found in Indian and Kenyan slum weddings; little "chance" to find them in Paris though.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Changaa

Melbourne, Australia
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13. Re: French liqueurs

What about my favourite - well, armagnac is my absolute favourite but can be very expensive - calvados. It is an apple brandy and can be used as a liquer or in cooking a rabbit a la normandie. I can buy it in Oz, but bringing back a bottle from France would something else. When in Paris, I buy a small bottle at the local supermarket to cook/drink while I'm there, and a big bottle to bring home

Paris, France
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14. Re: French liqueurs

If you will be in the Marais, there is a tiny shop on Place du Marche Sainte Catherine - not far from Metro St Paul. It is called "Absinthe", and sells many different brands not available in the US, as well as glassware, absinthe spoons, etc. You should be able to stay within your budget and come up with something no one has seen before.

Second the opinion on Monoprix - a big store will have a good selection, but really not much available there that you can't find at home, and unless you have a membership card, you won't benefit from any price specials.

Try instead a few of the independent wine shops, and look for an eau de vie like "Vieille Prune", or "Cynar", a bitter aperitif made from artichokes. These are not too common in the US.

Chicago, Illinois
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15. Re: French liqueurs

I could easily buy St. Germaine when I lived in Nashville so I am sure it is easy to buy in its fancy bottle in California and probably for much less. It would also be a real drag to lug home and the bottle is heavy and awkward.

Denmark, Europe
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16. Re: French liqueurs

Potatoe alcohol is definitely schnapps ! Vodka can be made from all sorts of scrap..... LOL !!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vodka

Tampa, Florida
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17. Re: French liqueurs

Back atcha!!

Schnapps is made with fruit...LOL!!!!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schnapps

The Irish folks and diaspora are probably shouting POTEEN! about now. (Also spelled Potín and Potcheen.

Edited: 27 August 2012, 17:37
Paris, France
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18. Re: French liqueurs

Frankly, I would not buy anything totally rare that you cannot find where you live. When you buy something that rare, you don't ever dare to drink it because if you run out, that's it! It has happened to me plenty of times. Better to buy something that is just horribly expensive where you live, because then you can always spring for more for a really special occasion.

(But if you must know, my own preference is for green Chartreuse -- readily available around the world -- and which some people spit out when they taste it, screaming "cough syrup!")

England, United...
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19. Re: French liqueurs

Is it really worth travelling all that way with breakable heavy bottles?

What about instead making some bottles of Vin d'Orange yourself at home. Vin d'Orange is a surprisingly potent aperitif which we first found in Provence, but you can buy it in some shops elsewhere although it's not ubiquitous.

But I think it would be more special if you can make it at home in California (you can always give it a nice label and boast of your French drink-making skills).

It basically needs oranges, wine, eau-de-vie (or vodka), sugar, and spices. There are lots of recipes on the internet, like this one:

marmiton.org/recettes/recette_aperitif-vin-d…

Edited: 27 August 2012, 18:59
Tampa, Florida
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20. Re: French liqueurs

yellow Chartreuse is nice, too.

and Farigoule.