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JPFP Traiteur, 75006

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Paris, France
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229 posts
401 reviews
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JPFP Traiteur, 75006

If you are desperate for a traiteur and take out, avoid this place near Rue de Buci in the 6th. While the food looks wonderful (and surely it is) and the shop itself charming, the women staff are so rude it borders on abuse. No excuses, even for Paris.

Paris, France
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1. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

Actually, I can accept rude service at a shop as long as I get top quality merchandise. Nasty people do not perturb me.

Did you use all of the appropriate greetings with the staff before trying to enter into a transaction?

Paris, France
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2. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

I have lived in France 15 years (and many other countries), so you will have to decide if my greetings were appropriate. Our values differ Kerouac2. I believe civility and politesse as important as quality merchandise. BOTH are equal and money wasted accepting less.

the big blue marble
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3. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

This is Paris. I can get top quality merchandise with ease, so I demand respectful service.

Paris, France
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4. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

Not a problem, but frankly I never take anybody seriously who complains about being mistreated and yet does not give the slightest information about how this affront was carried out. I have seen people with 'USA' in their names who have found it inadmissable that the cashier did not bag their groceries, so forgive me for not commiserating in my current state of ignorance.

And of course "no excuses, even for Paris" implies that Paris is already a place of inferior service in the person's mind.

Carry on.

Denver, Colorado
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for Paris, Denver
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5. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

simmonskUSA, so what exactly happened? Sorry you had a bad experience

Pennsylvania
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6. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

I am also curious. We made big faux pas on our New Years Eve visit to a traiteur last year, but it was our fault. However once the clerk realized we were foreign things smoothed out. I have to say I checked all my guidebooks and found nothing in there to direct me to proper behavior in a traiteur.

Edited: 05 January 2013, 23:06
Tallahassee, Florida
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7. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

Maddie: For those of us who don't know, could you please be more specific on exactly what the proper behavior is in a traiteur other than the normal greeting? Thanks.

Paris, France
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8. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

Kerouac #2 and 4. I don't really understand your interpretation and tone. "NO excuses, even for Paris" is a distinct compliment and in no remote way infers "inferior". For replies # 5, 6, and 7 what Kerouac #2 and 4 refer to is cultural politenesses. In France one regularly says BONJOUR walking into smaller shops such as a traiteur (no need for anyone to know anyone, no one needs to be looking at you either, just a French politeness). I always smile, it's a cultural universal and generally appreciated (world wide). When leaving it is AU REVOIR, MERCI, even if no one is listening or looking (you will often hear a reply echoing somewhere). This is not necessarily done at places as enormous as Galerie LaFayette or Bon Marche, although it is generally required when approaching a service person for assistance and on departure after service is finished. There is huge variation in Paris, so watch what others are doing. I like the custom and do it as habit even though not French . It usually establishes a nice exchange, and is generally appreciated . In village France it is regular politesse, required and appreciated. If you like and are comfortable enough, add a twist of humor (for those vendors who have one) and special appreciation for something in the shop, and communication is generally comfortably launched. The brief interpersonal exchange weighs more importantly in France. I personally like the custom as it adds a sense of civility to daily interactions and over time frequenting a particular place, it helps establish relationship (eg, a boulangerie, charcuterie, etc).

Bedfordshire...
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for Berlin
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9. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

You still haven't told us how and why you were treated so rudely. I would also be interested to know what Maddie's 'faux pas' was

Paris, France
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10. Re: JPFP Traiteur, 75006

Yes, I am still waiting to know more. Most of us here do know about saying bonjour, you know. I have lived here most of my life.